ShoopsThumb
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Apr 28, 2006 2:12 am

Privacy hedge in mostly shady backyard

Greetings from Zone 4 in USA!

I have been seeking suggestions for some time on the proper bushes or trees for a privacy hedge.

The area would be a "U" shape on three sides of my back yard. It has high shade from the general layout of the land - house is on the south side of this area, 4 large evergreen trees are immediately to the south of the middle side of the "U", and houses to the right and left.

The soil is rich black Clarion belt. I don't know the pH.

I removed a hodgepodge of bushes from the same area - lilac, and three other like-sized varieties of which I was unfamiliar. They were ancient and had wooded out to stalky bottoms with sparse foliage on top.

I really wanted to put Arborvitiae Smaarsgaard (spelling?) but was told it needs more sun. Would Hicks Yew work? I don't really desire to have much spreading out, would prefer more columnar. Is Yew a toxicological liablity? I don't want to hurt any children who might be curious, etc.

Help please I am confused and keep getting different stories from Nursery folks. One says Burning Bush will work and another says it won't and I have to get some kind of bushes that spread to 12 feet wide (yikes!).

Thanks to anyone who might offer advice turning ShoopsThumb into GreenThumb!

ST

Brad
Full Member
Posts: 38
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2006 6:01 pm
Location: North Carolina

I'm not as famaliar with zone 4 as I am in 7. I'll give a few suggestions but I'm sure a few folks here are more knowledgable in this area. I think Hicks Yew would be fine. The arborvitae that you mentioned would be best in full sun, but will live in a shaded environment. It may be a little sparse but I think it would survive fine. How does hemlock do in zone 4? I would think about that one as well.

Hopefully that will help. :wink:

ShoopsThumb
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Apr 28, 2006 2:12 am

Brad

Thanks for the reply Brad, I appreciate the info.

ST

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