yeahyeahyeah
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Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2009 7:56 pm
Location: NJ

Weeping Cedar [Need Advice]

Hello,

About 5 years ago I planted a Weeping Cedar in my front yard. Until about a year ago it was doing well (not growing as much as I would have hoped but still doing well). About a year ago it started losing needles. Now it's barely hanging in and I'm not sure what to do (I'm not really good with these things so I need some help).

I'm attaching some photos to give an idea of the issue and the area. The soil is moist and well drained.

[img]https://img.photobucket.com/albums/v683/Yakety_Yak/IMG00043-20091005-1421.jpg[/img]

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rainbowgardener
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Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

I think you should have written in a little sooner.... that looks like it may be past saving. It actually looks quite tall for a 5 yr old weeping cedar (they are slow growers) but very narrow (what's left of the branches). That and it's position so close to the house makes me wonder if it was getting enough sun. They like full sun. They also like to be very well drained. If you are in one of the places in the country that got a ton of rain this season, it could have stayed too wet.

That said, I really don't know what to suggest to try saving it....

yeahyeahyeah
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Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2009 7:56 pm
Location: NJ

Well, I was fearing that was the case although I'm not surprised. I am assuming that at this point transplanting it would not help. Actually, that would probably just speed its demise right?

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rainbowgardener
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Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

Well, if you think in fact it could have been too wet and too shaded and you have a place to transplant it that would correct those things, it couldn't hurt to try. At worst it will die, which is what is happening now, so you didn't lose anything.

If you transplant it, don't fertilize, you want it to work on (re) establishing roots...

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