paqrat
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Sep 06, 2009 6:00 am
Location: North Louisiana

Mimosas as bonsai

Hi,

I was wondering if anyone had tried to bonsai a mimosa tree. Sorry I don't know the latin name. I've thought for some time they'd make a good candidate. The leaves are already small. The plants themselves are very hardy and they grow fast. If anyone has had any experience with them I'd appreciate hearing about it. They are practically a weed tree around here so I'd have plenty of potential 'victims'. :) Thanks

JTred
Green Thumb
Posts: 380
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2008 7:05 am
Location: Elizabeth, PA

Almost any woody tree or shrub can be grown as a bonsai. If there are a lot of them near your area try and grab a few in different stages and see what you can do. If they are considered "weed trees", then there are not as many ethical concerns (I have a few different "weed trees" myself). Type "mimosa bonsai" in to [url=https://images.google.com/images?q=mimosa+bonsai&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&ei=DmSkSuGmG-GK8QaQjfXVDw&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&ct=title&resnum=1]Google images[/url] to get some ideas.

P.S. I had no knowledge of mimosa prior to seeing this, but according to wikipedia, mimosa is a genus and there are over 400 different plants that can be called "Mimosa". Also according to wikipedia, the most common "mimosas" are the [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_Wattle]Silver Wattle[/url] and [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silk_Tree]Silk Tree[/url]. There is also a tree called [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mimosa_tenuiflora]mimosa[/url] which can be used to make a psycheldelic tea. Do you have a picture maybe?

User avatar
bonsaiboy
Greener Thumb
Posts: 892
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2007 1:54 am
Location: Earth

Any woody tree/shrub that has a decent lifespan and small enough leafs can be bonsaied.
הדמיון הוא יותר חשוב מאשר ידע

paqrat
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Sep 06, 2009 6:00 am
Location: North Louisiana

Hi,

I didn't realize there were that many mimosas. I looked in google images and found this; https://www.mellobonsai.com/care/Mimosa-bonsai.aspx

The second pic on the page looks like the ones that grow around here.

Thanks for your reply to my posting

JTred
Green Thumb
Posts: 380
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2008 7:05 am
Location: Elizabeth, PA

That looks like the silk tree posted above. If you have access to a lot of material, then have a go at it. Get several different plants in different stages of development, and especially try to find one that already has substantial trunk width and try to begin styling it.

paqrat
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Sep 06, 2009 6:00 am
Location: North Louisiana

I think I will give it a try. I've been thinking about it for some time. There is a vacant lot a short walk from my house. There are something like 20 or 30 mimosas growing there. Since the lot was mowed not too long ago I think these may be regrowth from an established root system. These trees can be pretty hard to kill. Unfortunately those are all about the same in height but I should have a choice of number of limbs.

krsezr
Newly Registered
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Oct 02, 2010 6:59 pm
Location: Texas

Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa, silk tree) bonsai

I grew up in Texas with mimosas everywhere. Now they are considered by purists as kudzu or hackberries, but I have always found the tiny pink umbrellas irresistible, so I have planted them where ever I live. Yes, they are relatively short lived typically and the seed pods are prone to spread and new volunteers cropping up along shallow roots. I have overwintered them in pots twice down to forty degrees without a problem and I have embarked on bonsai. That adventure may seem ridiculous, but it is a fast growing tree and I am fast approaching the end of my own line, so I'll not be starting any bristlecone pines...maybe a chinaberry, so I may enjoy it in full splendor in a year.

In the Spring, I'll post some pics
KRS

Return to “BONSAI FORUM”