bocondo
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Indoor Palm Tree leaves getting brown

I have this indoor palm tree in my family room, I water it regularly every other day or so. Recently its leaves started turn brown from the end, can you please suggest what it could be? And what should I do to cure and prevent?
[img]https://i25.tinypic.com/28bfoud.jpg[/img][/img]

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Kisal
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It may be getting too much water. In between waterings, the soil in larger pots should be allowed to dry to about 1/2 to 1 inch below the surface. Never allow the plant to stand in water that has drained into the saucer.

Also, it's important to keep the fronds of the palm clean to avoid attracting critters like spider mites. My palm is quite small, only about a foot tall, so I just rinse it off with the kitchen sink sprayer. Larger plants can be placed in the bathtub and rinsed under the shower. If your plant is so large that you cannot move the pot, I suggest that you regularly wipe off the fronds with a soft, damp cloth. Be sure to clean the stems and the undersides of the fronds, as well as the tops. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

bocondo
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Thanks for suggestions, I will wipe it with the damp cloth and water it less for few weeks and see the difference.

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Kisal
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The damaged leaves won't 'heal' and become green again. I suspect there may be some root rot going on, as a result of overwatering. As new roots grow, new damage should not occur, but that may take a couple of months to determine.

An alternative problem could be that it's root bound, and needs to be repotted. From what I can see in the picture you posted, the pot looks okay. I can't see how tall the plant is, though, so the actual situation may be different than what I can see.

The way it works is this: too much water causes the fine feeder roots to decay, which makes it impossible for the plant to take up sufficient water, causing the leaves to brown and, eventually, die. However, if the roots are too crowded in the pot, the soil cannot hold water long enough to allow the roots to take up sufficient water. The result is the same browning and dying of leaves. You can't really tell which problem you're dealing with by how wet the soil is, because in both situations, the surface of the soil will stay moist.

If you're capable of handling the plant, you can look at the bottom of the pot to see if roots are visible in the drainage holes. You can also remove the plant from its pot and look at the root ball, to see if there are a lot of roots wrapped around the outside. Either or both would indicate that the plant needs to be in a larger pot.

On the other hand, if the soil smells sour and/or the fine feeder roots look or feel mushy, then you're dealing with root rot.
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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bonsaiboy
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I would say that there is either to much salt buildup in the soil, it its not getting enough humidity. I would change the soil, just to be safe.
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bewildered_nmsu
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Ditto on the salt build-up. New soil.

Oliver
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Spray

Palms love humidity, but they are easily overwatered. I use a spray bottle everyday to clean my plants like a soft rain, but I rarely water the roots of a palm more than once every two to three days. The key is to not let the soil dry out completely between waterings. I'm a new green thumb (I did take some horticulture in college) but after 5 months my palms have grown fuller and look more healthy than ever! also try placing river rocks under the planter to elevate the plant incase they are overwatered. It doesn't hurt to spray with soapy water if you start to notice bugs, especially if you bring new plants home.

KennyD
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My palm that I have had for 12 years has root rot, as a guest thought every time they would come to visit they would help out am water my indoor plants. He could not understand why the leaves were turning brown as he as watering it a couple times a week. OUCH. I use to water it ever 12 weeks in the shower and let it dry out in between times.

What is the best way to deal with root rot?
Repot?
Let it out?

Any help is appreaciated.

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