Rfranco
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How do i get my ficus ginseng roots to grow more???

Hi, I just got my first ficus ginseng yesterday :D at a local store its probably not in the best condition but i want to work on it i hope one day to call it a bonsai :wink: My question is how to grow my roots out??? I got the idea when i saw a pic of a bonsai on a rock i think my tree would look perfect on one.please help.
here is a pic,im thinking a bout cutting some branches a doing some training :?:

[img]https://i776.photobucket.com/albums/yy48/rfrancofile/ficusginseng.jpg[/img][/img]
Last edited by Rfranco on Thu Sep 03, 2009 1:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

cynthia_h
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Please see our Webmaster's Helpful Guidelines at https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=23

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Best wishes with your plant! :)

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Rfranco
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thanks for the info .
:)

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Gnome
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Rfranco,

I'm not sure that this species is a good choice for the root over rock style. It seems to me that the fleshy, tuberous roots would not be a good candidate. I'm working on a ROR Schefflera right now and it seems well suited to the style.

Norm

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bonsaiboy
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First, and no mean to alarm you, but it appears as though the trees roots are wrinkled. If the roots feel soft and corky, the tree may have contracted a certain disease that plagues (primarily) Ginseng ficuses. Cut open a root if you find one of the above symptoms. If it is spongy, hollow, or rotted out, there is not much you can do to save it, other than try to grow some clippings.

Aside from that, one can encourage more arial roots to grow on a ficus by placing it in a humid enviornment. See here for more detail and other tips https://www.bonsaihunk.us/cultural.html
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Rfranco
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Thank you Norm can u give me some ideas for this tree or just some general pointers.


Norm do you think its to early to start some seeds(plum,olive,pear) :?: or is it to early and u think i should wait.

Rfranco
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bonsaiboy i appreciate the observation idont realy wanna cut the root open, is their an other way to diagnose this problem.

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bonsaiboy
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It is possible to scratch off a patch of bark on the root. If its green underneath, its okay. If its brown, the root is more than likely dead. If you are unsure, propagate a few clippings. This will ensure if it does have a problem, you will at least have more ficuses to work with.
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Rfranco,
Norm do you think its to early to start some seeds(plum,olive,pear) Question or is it to early and u think i should wait.
Some seeds require special treatment in order to germinate. This often entails a period of cold storage that mimics their natural circumstance of falling to the ground in the fall and resting all winter. So you have to know the requirements of the species in question. Without looking it up I suspect that both Plum and Pear would benefit from/require a cold storage period and germinate in the spring.

Putting the mechanics of germination aside for a moment there are other considerations. Growing from seed is a rather tedious endeavor that will entail more than a few years with very little to do other than allowing them to grow. It certainly can be done and I won't try to talk you out of it but please don't put all your eggs in one basket.

I suggest approaching this from more than one direction, with young material being just one. For instance, you can learn a lot by working on nursery material. Several of our members have purchased Boxwood at the home centers. You can always find Junipers and I guarantee that you will get a better/healthier tree for your money than if you bought one of their potted Juniper bonsai. Now is a good time of year to pick up material that they don't want to keep around for the winter. The real trick is discerning material with potential from that without.

You can also spend a few dollars and get a tree that already has a few years of training done. Not all inexpensive bonsai are the mallsai we so often see. Of course you won't get a gem for $30.00 but you can get something that resembles a bonsai rather than a simple seedling.

I am always on the lookout for old landscape material that can be worked. This year I picked up a Yew and a Juniper that a landscape company ripped out. Unfortunately they damaged the bark on both pieces in the process but hopefully I can work with them.

Norm

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