baileynboo
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 8:50 pm

quick growing ground cover

Please tell me if this will work. Our new house is in the middle of a yard of 40 foot pine trees,. The ground has been covered in pine straw by the builder, which I guess is ok because no grass will grow, but it is so blah. In the front yard, I was thinking of putting some type of ground cover and letting it work it's way out about 10 feet or so. What would be a quick growing ,very short type?? Thanks. I like ivy, but everyone just gasps when I say that :?:

opabinia51
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4659
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

Ivy is very invasive and will choke out local Flora and is very detrimental to local environments.

I would personally choose a soil building ground cover and preferably a nitrogen fixer like Hairy Vetch, Clover, buckwheat (I personally wouldn't choose this one because of aesthetics) and so on. I think that maybe something like Rye or oats would be good as well (in conjunction with a nitrogen fixer)

The Helpful Gardener
Mod
Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

I'd ask where first...

What zone are you? What state? Country?

HG

baileynboo
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 8:50 pm

I'm sorry, it is a zone 8, on the coast of southern North Carolina, USA

Guest

Re: quick growing ground cover

baileynboo wrote:Please tell me if this will work. Our new house is in the middle of a yard of 40 foot pine trees,. The ground has been covered in pine straw by the builder, which I guess is ok because no grass will grow, but it is so blah. In the front yard, I was thinking of putting some type of ground cover and letting it work it's way out about 10 feet or so. What would be a quick growing ,very short type?? Thanks. I like ivy, but everyone just gasps when I say that :?:
im from canada and don't think i can help but i think ivy works and looks nice i have english ivy in my yard and it grows quite well

opabinia51
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4659
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

A correction to something that I posted above: Buckwheat is NOT a Nitrogen fixer.

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Baileynboo, did you ever find a groundcover? I don't recommend ivy either.

Newt

Guest

qiuck growing ground covers

im in zone 5a but here is afew that might grow in your area https://www.marthastewart.com/page.jhtml?type=learn-cat&id=cat605

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

A caveat for the site that Sharon recommended. Many of the recommended groundcovers can be very invasive. Euonymous has escaped into the environment and can quickly climb trees, ajuga can appear in your lawn and be a pest, ivy is invasive, Pachysandra terminalis - Japanese spurge is also invasive and can escape into woodlands (there is a native - Pachysandra procumbens - Allegheny spurge that is not invasive), Aegopodium podagraria 'Variegata' - variegated bishop's weed is very invasive, and once you have it can be nearly impossible to get rid of, Convallaria majalis - lily of the valley can become an invasive pest even when contained, Vinca minor - creeping myrtle, lesser or dwarf periwinkle can escape into woodlands and is listed as an invasive species in many states.

Please always be careful when recommending a site that just lists groundcovers without noting that some can be invasive. Always research any that you think you might like to grow so there are no unpleasant surprises.

Newt

Guest

ground covers bailey boo

im from ontario and most ground covers arent invasive if they are takn care of im very sorry that sorry that i gave you a list of invasive plants but if you want to check the invasive ones here is a site https://www.uvm.edu/~pass/perry/oh65inva.html

opabinia51
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4659
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

Actually Sharon, that raises a very good point. Most people don't take care of plants as much as you or I do. Especially with ground covers. So, when choosing a ground cover, it is important to choose one that is not going to invade local flora and fauna.

I always say this, and I'll say it again: it's really important to check your local invasive lists (usually found at a government website but, easy to look up by just typing in your state or province AND invasive list). Anyway, just because something is not on an invasive list does not mean that it isn't a huge problem.

Government postings are definately NOT up to date. For this reason it is a good idea to acquire as much knowledge about a particular plant from experts as you can before planting it.

A huge problem where I live is Scotch Broom that was planted by a Scottish person who brought the seeds because they were lonely from their homeland. Well, now the entire Island is covered with the stuff because someone planted a few seeds. Another example is English Ivy, around where I live all the forests are 100% invaded with the stuff. It has choked out all native flora, which directly impacts local fauna.

We gardeners have to be very careful and very informed before planting certain plants so it is important that we listen to advice given to eachother and take it to heart.

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Sharon, that's not a bad list, but is for the northeast US and probably some of Canada as well. Everything that I said is invasive from the Martha Stewart list is on that list. There is one on Martha Stewart's that I forgot to mention and that's Lamium maculatum - Dead Nettle.

I actually have a few sites with recommended groundcovers for different types of conditions such as wet, shade, sun, rocky, etc, but I don't just give the link as several on the list are invasive.

Newt

Return to “Flower Gardening & Garden Design”