User avatar
momo
Cool Member
Posts: 91
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 10:12 pm
Location: Santa Rosa, Ca

Are these roses growing on their own roots?

I inherited these roses with my new house and I'm trying to rehabilitate them. They were planted too close to a tree so they are competing with the trees roots and getting too much shade. I am planning on transplanting them in the fall, but until then I am doing my best to get them healthier. I pruned them a few weeks ago, taking off the dead canes and as much of the diseased leaves as I felt was safe. Then I gave them water and rose fertilizer and I sprayed them with an organic 3 in 1 rose spray. They have responded by sending up some new growth, much of which is coming up from the roots and at the base of the canes. I was going to leave the growth at the base because the roses are very leggy and I couldn't see a graft line so I thought they might be on their own roots. Here are pics of the bottoms of the plants, sorry they aren't better quality.
[img]https://i454.photobucket.com/albums/qq268/momo2820/rose1.jpg[/img]
Rose #1

[img]https://i454.photobucket.com/albums/qq268/momo2820/rose3.jpg[/img] [img]https://i454.photobucket.com/albums/qq268/momo2820/rose2.jpg[/img]
Rose #2

Thanks for the help!

User avatar
vintagejuls
Green Thumb
Posts: 429
Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 8:12 am
Location: Southern California / USDA Zone 10

It's hard to tell for sure since it's early in their growth, but those new shoots are probably suckers which should be cut off eventually.

Here in California, we can get away with pruning and trimming roses almost whenever we want to; I let mine tell me when, although I do try and stick to a routine.

It is good that you are waiting to transplant until fall. If they were mine, I might try some rich compost in the soil in a about a week or 2. Other than that, I think you are on the right track in your rehab... :wink:

Some pics of the area and a full view of the entire plant would be helpful. Good luck with them and keep us posted on their progress. :D
~ Julie

Tomorrow is a new day; you shall begin it well... Emerson

User avatar
momo
Cool Member
Posts: 91
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 10:12 pm
Location: Santa Rosa, Ca

Ok, I looked at them more closely and took some more pictures. I think the larger bush has one stem that is from the original grafted rose, and one stem that is a large sucker. There are three buds on the rose and one is very different from the other two.
I think that all that is left of the other rose are suckers from the rootstock, it has never had a bud or bloom and it looks like the center of the plant may have rotted out or something.

[img]https://i454.photobucket.com/albums/qq268/momo2820/rosearea2.jpg[/img] Rose Area
[img]https://i454.photobucket.com/albums/qq268/momo2820/rosebush.jpg[/img] Rose #1
[img]https://i454.photobucket.com/albums/qq268/momo2820/rosebuds.jpg[/img] Rose Buds
[img]https://i454.photobucket.com/albums/qq268/momo2820/rosebud.jpg[/img] Smaller Rose Bud
[img]https://i454.photobucket.com/albums/qq268/momo2820/rosebush2.jpg[/img]Rose Bush #2

I hope these pictures help shed light on the situation! :P

mikes
Newly Registered
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 12:32 pm
Location: nw ct

i agree that some are suckers and should be cut--they are ones that ldon't grow off rose trunk

User avatar
vintagejuls
Green Thumb
Posts: 429
Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 8:12 am
Location: Southern California / USDA Zone 10

Momo,

A couple look as though they are planted too deep. Roses need to have the ball or crown sitting on top of the soil. Since you plan to relocate these roses in the fall, you could safely cut them down low. This would probably help their root structure to become stronger for the move.

:idea: Another idea is to prune them low to dig out and plant in pots until you are ready to transplant.

Keep us posted. :wink:
~ Julie

Tomorrow is a new day; you shall begin it well... Emerson

User avatar
momo
Cool Member
Posts: 91
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 10:12 pm
Location: Santa Rosa, Ca

I like the idea of putting them in pots because I haven't decided where to transplant them to yet. I was thinking if they were in pots I could move them around the garden and see where they do the best.

Here is a picture of one of the opened rose buds, I want them to do better because they are beautiful!
[img]https://i454.photobucket.com/albums/qq268/momo2820/rose.jpg[/img]

And can I really just cut the cane 6-12 inches from the ground? I know that's what it says, but it's scary to chop them like that! :shock:

cynthia_h
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7501
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 11:02 pm
Location: El Cerrito, CA

Well, you *can* cut them down that hard, but only do it during the dormant period, which around here is January or so.

It will force gigantic blooms, but not many of them. My next-door neighbor to the north has done this for years; her bushes have few but mighty blooms.

Cynthia

User avatar
momo
Cool Member
Posts: 91
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 10:12 pm
Location: Santa Rosa, Ca

My goal is the health of the overall plant, particularly the roots, not giant flowers. What is the best way to prune to encourage growth? There is only the one cane now, and it only has leaves on the top half.
Sunset zone 14

User avatar
vintagejuls
Green Thumb
Posts: 429
Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 8:12 am
Location: Southern California / USDA Zone 10

You could do a light pruning now. I plan to do so in the next couple of days because the spring blooming is pretty much done. I do a light trim now to shape and then I will get another bloom session before December.

In California, our heaviest rain comes in February so it is good to do a major prune in January like Cynthia indicated. I read alot of different times to prune for California so I just let mine tell me when to do a light trim vs a heavy prune. :)
~ Julie

Tomorrow is a new day; you shall begin it well... Emerson

Return to “Rose Forum”