oregonskateok
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Growing plants too close to each other =/

I planted my vegetables a bit close to eachother, and some of them are starting to touch the other ones. One of my tomato plants is starting to grow into another tomato plant, and I have a melon that is doing the same. They are about a month and a half old now, is it possible to replant them without hurting the plant?

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freedhardwoods
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Plants just touching each other shouldn't be a problem. How far apart are they planted?

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gixxerific
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Of course there is fighting for root space and nutrients. But just cause they are growing into each other doesn't mean much as long as one isn't overshadowing the other too much.

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jal_ut
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Just let them grow for this year, but take notes. It is OK if the plants touch. Plants do better if they are not too crowded, but my tomatoes, melons, cukes, and squash always seem to get intertwined no matter how much space I leave. When you get an idea just how big the different varieties get, you will be better prepared to know how close to plant next year. Have a great harvest!
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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rainbowgardener
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crowded plants

Trying to move them at this point would create worse stress than the crowding. Just give plenty of water and nutrients so they don't have to compete too much. If they are starting to shade each other you can pull some leaves to keep that from happening.

oregonskateok
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Thanks for responses, I will continue growing them and see how it goes.

tedln
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oregonskateok wrote:Thanks for responses, I will continue growing them and see how it goes.
I wouldn't be very concerned. It will work out. I have five acres to grow on, but choose to grow very crowded in raised beds. The crowded conditions have never been detrimental to my plants so long as they have plenty of nutrients, moisture, and sunlight. I'm finishing one of the best spring gardening seasons ever and looking forward to a crowded fall season.

[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/IMG_1703.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/IMG_1704.jpg[/img]



Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

GitarooGarden
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Ted, what is the purpose of that green netting in the second picture? I assume insect prevention. Does the added protection make accessing your plants for watering,etc. more difficult? Which plants do you keep underneath it?

tedln
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Gitaroo,

The netting prevents the birds from looking at my ripe tomatoes with hungry eyes. A couple of weeks after those photos were taken, my tomato plants were loaded with red ripe fruit. The local cardinals love to take one big bite out of each red tomato. The netting doesn't hinder my gardening in any way. My watering system is all soaker hose attached to a buried water hose which is attached to a battery powered timer hooked to a faucet. I don't have to hand water, so the netting doesn't interfere.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

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rainbowgardener
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netting

I have my tomatoes caged in netting also (slightly different, black netting, sold as deer netting or bird netting). The openings in the net are big enough that it doesn't keep insects out. But it does stop the raccoons, squirrels, possums and groundhogs (all of which are on my property) from taking bites out. Without the netting, I would not get any intact tomatoes.

tedln
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Since part of my gardening philosophy is to do it at the lowest possible cost, I use the old crinoline or tulle as it's called today. I buy it at fabric stores for about $0.99 per yard. You can get a real tight weave, but I use a fairly large weave so air can circulate through it. The weave is tight enough to keep most bugs out though. I've seen them trying to get in but they can't. Since most tomatoes are open pollinated, they don't need a pollinator like bees. The netting doesn't interfere with production of tomatoes. I do have to take it off late in the spring gardening season because the tomatoes over grow the top of the cages and bloom again for the fall crop of tomatoes. After the summer heat is over, the birds no longer bother my tomatoes. I think they were only needing a little moisture from the tomatoes.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

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