elmobrum
Newly Registered
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2009 8:41 pm
Location: Birmingham

what plants for shaded areas

hello all. desperately need your help here!! One side of my garden gets very little sun and I am trying to find colourful plants and flowers that don't require sun.

Any suggestions?? We have lots of greenery but need splashes of colour. I already have differnt heathers which are lovely but need more.

loking forward to hearing your suggestions.

elmobrum
elmobrum

User avatar
Kisal
Mod Emeritus
Posts: 7648
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:04 am
Location: Oregon

I think impatiens are nice. :)

What is the soil like in the area? Is it clayey and damp, or is it well-drained? What plants might like to grow in that spot will depend on the soil texture and drainage, as well as the amount of light. :)

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

flowers for shade

Here's a selection of perennial flowers for shade, most of them selected to be native to your area and providing "splashes of color":

columbine, astilbe (showy flower plumes in white, pink, and some brilliant reds), jack-in-the pulpit (not showy or colorful and a spring ephemeral that disappears after awhile, but a fascinating flower and one of our beloved native woodland spring wildflowers) wild ginger (also not showy or colorful, but spreads to make a very rich looking green carpet groundcover)

hardy geraniums (not the red "geraniums" which are actually pelargonium, but the true geranium/cranesbill), coral bells (these come with many colors of gorgeous purple, bronze etc foliage and are often grown more for foliage than flower) , cardinal flower (tall, brilliant red flowers that hummingbirds love), great blue lobelia, wood lily, obedient plant, scarlet sage (salvia coccinea a perennial sage that grows in shade, another red hummingbird plant), celandine poppy/ yellow wood poppy (I have a lot of this and I love it, native woodland plant that gets covered with brilliant golden yellow flowers in spring and then pops out a few here and there through the season, readily reseeds itself and pops up in new places, but isn't aggressive) red trillium (another spring ephemeral)

Selected from the native plant data base at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center https://www.wildflower.org/plants/ Some of these a good local nursery would have, some you might have to order on line.

I like impatiens too. They are fast and easy, low maintenance and they pump out color all season. But they are annuals so you have to start them over every spring.

User avatar
Kisal
Mod Emeritus
Posts: 7648
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:04 am
Location: Oregon

Impatiens and Spanish bluebells are all that seem to be willing to grow on the north side of my porch. The area is total shade, and there is only about 4 or 5 feet of space between my flower bed and my neighbor's 7' tall hedge.

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

shade

Yeah, there's very little sun and then there's total shade and total shade is very tough.

Here's some other thoughts: Ajuga (carpet bugle) has thrived for me in a full shade space between my house and a tall hedge, begonias, hostas of course-- I have one growing under my deck pretty much in the dark, but to do that it needs to stay well watered and even so it's surviving, not thriving, ferns, bleeding heart, sweet woodruff survives in dry shade under a tree, dutchman's breeches, virginia bluebells.

Return to “What Doesn't Fit Elsewhere”