BabyGartner
Full Member
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu May 28, 2009 3:34 pm
Location: Tulsa, OK

Pepper Plants on a Production Pause....

I have 2 pepper plants each in a 1 gallon pot. I've researched container sizes and it looks like my beans and peppers can remain in their 1 gallon pots, while I had to change to much much larger ones for my tomatoes and zucchini.

My peppers are watered constantly, I spray an insect repellant on them about once a week, they are given water soluable plant food 1-2 times a week, and they get plenty of sunlight and heat. Tulsa is HOT and humid right now.

Question is.... why haven't I seen any pepper blooms? I assume I should see some flowering at this point. I have green beans already and my zucchini are FINALLY and SURPRISINGLY coming about-- 1st fruit this weekend!-- but my peppers seem stagnant. I read the other day in Tulsa People magazine that peppers are a cinch to grow in my climate, yet I haven't seen success. They keep growing taller and stronger and leafier, but no buds- no peppers- no success. Any suggestions? Is it normal to have to wait and wait? I didn't think the zucchini would come about then I turned around and I have fruit, same with the green beans, so maybe the same will happen with the peppers. I guess I'll just wait and keep doing what I'm doing.... they look healthy, but just a bunch of green leaves! :(

Haesuse
Senior Member
Posts: 168
Joined: Sun May 03, 2009 9:18 pm
Location: Birmingham-AL, USA

what kind of peppers are they? how much sun do they get? got pictures? how big are they? etc
-Zone 7b
-Veggies, succulents, cacti, flowers, and houseplants!

User avatar
splat42069
Senior Member
Posts: 139
Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 9:00 am
Location: Eastern PA

Do you fertilize them? If not give a shot of a blooming fert and see what happens. Anothing thing could be if you are fert. them check the ratio. You want a higher P,K for blooming/flowering and a higher N. for growing.

TZ -OH6
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 2097
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2008 7:27 pm
Location: Mid Ohio

Do not fertilize so much! Once or twice a month if the plants are growing strongly is enough. If the plants are not growing well and you have recently fertilized, then adding more can only harm them. Over fertilization is also a reason why tomatoes and peppers do not flower or set fruit. Peppers are especially sensitive to high levels of fertilizer.

petalfuzz
Green Thumb
Posts: 632
Joined: Sat May 31, 2008 3:37 pm

I saw a major blossom reduction last year when it got so hot! Kind of the plant equivalent of my cats just throwing themselves on the floor cause it is too hot to do anything else!

Haesuse
Senior Member
Posts: 168
Joined: Sun May 03, 2009 9:18 pm
Location: Birmingham-AL, USA

petalfuzz wrote:I saw a major blossom reduction last year when it got so hot! Kind of the plant equivalent of my cats just throwing themselves on the floor cause it is too hot to do anything else!
I'm getting that right now...
-Zone 7b
-Veggies, succulents, cacti, flowers, and houseplants!

User avatar
Drumopelli
Full Member
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Jun 10, 2009 9:01 pm
Location: Glendale, AZ

As someone else asked: What type of peppers?

Beyond that, I would say that you are over fertilizing (almost severely). Once or twice a month only (or perhaps if they are yellowing). Nitrogen helps with plant growth, and if the plant is spending all its resources growing, it's not going to produce fruit. Once you see flower buds, quit fertilizing. Water soluble plant foods (like Miracle Grow) have a very high nitrogen content. It's great to get the plant healthy and established, but then stop. If you are going to fertilize, try using fish emulsion. It has only 1% nitrogen. Potash and Potassium should get the plants producing fruit (but not when plant food is mostly nitrogen).

I don't know what "watered constantly" means, but be careful not to over water. My pepper plants (depending on species) get watered once a day or once every other day or more and I live in AZ with 110 degree full sun (currently) and they are in pots also. Peppers like jalapenos, habaneros, etc. like the weather hot and the soil a little on the dry side (even sandy). Other types of more tropical peppers like it a little more moist :D Too much watering can cause the fruit to rot on the stem.

Unless you have some sort of insect infestation, I would suggest not using pesticides on your plants at all. I can't see pesticides helping a plant grow or produce fruit. Don't use them unless you have to.

Sun is great for peppers (6-8 hours per day). But if it gets too hot, shade in the hottest part of the day can go a long way.

Overall, it seems like you are paying too much attention to the plants. Water them every couple days, quit fertilizing them, and quit spraying "insect repellant" on them. Let them be and let Nature take Her course.

My 4 and a half cents :wink:
My short term memory isn't what it used to be. Also, my short term memory isn't what it used to be.

mhinkle
Newly Registered
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2010 5:39 pm
Location: Jenks America

peppers producing

Hi, I know this is quite late, but I hope you realized that most peppers take 90--130 days to produce fruit...
Thanks!
Matt.
Dr. Matthew M. Hinkle

User avatar
tn_veggie_gardner
Senior Member
Posts: 175
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 1:49 pm
Location: Hermitage, TN.

This is actually kind of normal for peppers. They somehow know when Summer is & when grown outdoors, will not tend to start to produce any fruit until May/June. Patience & you will see some fruit production, I'm sure. =)

garden5
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 3062
Joined: Fri Aug 07, 2009 5:40 pm
Location: ohio

I'd say that, for future reference, you should try just letting the peppers be as far as fertilizer is concerned and just add a good amount to compost. That will result in more balanced fertilizer. Also, you may have been doing too much watering, it's hard to say since I don't know your climate.

Better luck this year. :D
There's something new growing in the Helpful Gardener Forum! Become a part of it here!



Return to “Vegetable Gardening Forum”