eva_moonflower
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Drooping plant!! Supposed to be a moonflower...

This plant was given to me and the lady said it was a moonflower, but I have no idea. I planted it and now it is drooping. I wattered it yesterday and today, but to no avail. Help?!


[img]https://i388.photobucket.com/albums/oo325/shadowyn79/100_1273.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i388.photobucket.com/albums/oo325/shadowyn79/100_1272.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i388.photobucket.com/albums/oo325/shadowyn79/100_1271.jpg[/img] [img]https://i388.photobucket.com/albums/oo325/shadowyn79/100_1270.jpg[/img]

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hendi_alex
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Moon flower as a common name could mean any of the many night opening species. But I've bought moon flower seeds for the past few years, and those are a vining plant with heart shaped leaves. Blooms a large white flower, open in the evening.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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Kisal
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The plant in the pictures is known as Moonflower and Angel's Trumpet. It is a member of the Datura family ... possibly Datura inoxia?

Sorry, but I don't know what's wrong with it. Perhaps spider mites? Have you checked it for those or other insects?

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rainbowgardener
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moonflower

As alex said moonflower most commonly refers to a vine, scientific name Ipomoea, which is closely related to morning glory. However, it seems that moonflower is also sometimes used as a common name for a Datura species
(Datura wrightii aka: Devil's Apple, Jimsom Weed, Atropine Plant, Moonflower, Desert Thorny Apple, Deadly Nightshade.) This plant is quite poisonous, so watch out for it. There's a very cool video on youtube


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShIEVq8eWVQ

showing a Datura plant that looks just like yours in time lapse photography, being watered and coming back from totally wilted. However your plant has leaves that aren't just wilted, they are curled. That's not a good sign, probably some kind of pest or disease.

bullthistle
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Water the plant, including leaves at dusk and if you can shield it from the sun for a few days it should be okay.

eva_moonflower
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I think I know what happened. The plant was in good soil, but I put the old soil from the yard on top. long story short, the sandy soil hardened so much, the water would roll off. I pulled up the sand and watered so I will tell you guys if it worked... thanks for your help.

eva_moonflower
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Nope... still drooping...

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hendi_alex
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The bad thing about drooping is it can mean too much water, or it can mean too little water. Perhaps get a moisture meter with a probe and test moisture down in the root zone. Sometimes new plants have top growth that is large relative to the root development, and when placed in the ground transpiration simply exceeds the plant's capacity to absorb water. In such a case, it is good to remove some of the top growth until the roots develop more and catch up. Some plants just can't handle late afternoon sun, and will droop regardless. In that case, move the plant so that it avoids the hot afternoon exposure. Of course, there is always the possibility that your plant just perks up after a few days, but with this plant, the problem seems to be persisting too long.

If the plant was mine, I would lift it. Would assess root condition. And would put it back into a container, giving the plant morning only sun until it perks back up. Then would try to find a better location before putting it back in the ground. Oh, would also trim off that flower or seed ball, as would have to be taking quite a bit of energy from such a young plant.

Good luck!
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

eva_moonflower
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I pruned off the bulb and watered it more and it looks like its perking up. Thanks for all your great advice.

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