bbingham
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Location: Richmond, VA

Why have my tomatoes stopped growning?

I have seven tomato plants - two different varieties, three purple heirloom (Cherokee) and four yellow pears. I bought them from a local farm and have had great luck with their products before. For the first two weeks, they were in great shape - but for the past two or three weeks, they haven't grown at all! I expected to have large growth spurt since we have had plenty of rain and nice sunny days ... but nada! I know that I have them planted too close - but I didn't think that would effect their growth. Should I remove some of the plants or is there something else going on? I am including some images! Thank you!!!

[url]https://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=15713&id=1580029948&saved#/photo.php?pid=216945&id=1580029948[/url]

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Kisal
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I can't see the image. It tells me I have to log in to Facebook to see it. I'm not a member of Facebook.

cynthia_h
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Same here. Not a member of Facebook.

To post pix that we can all see, please read the webmaster's guidelines at

https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3724

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

James282
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Nothing appears out of the ordinary...the only thing I can think of is that they don't have enough nutrients due to their close proximity. Have you fed them at all over the last few weeks when this lack of growth has taken place?

Also, have you grown things in this area before - so you know you have good drainage?

bbingham
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Thanks for replying! It's a brand new raised bed, but I have seen the water drain out when it rains & haven't noticed any pooling. I fed the garden two weeks ago and was going to do it this week - my food recommended a light coating - only about 5 minutes?

bbingham
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Sorry! Hopefully here is the image!

[img]https://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww192/bbleezee/SANY0606.jpg?t=1243632867[/img]

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Kisal
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Thanks for posting the new link. :)

It looks to me like there might be some fungal or bacterial spot disease starting on those lower leaves. You might want to remove them, to try to avoid losing the entire plant. I'm not positive it's a disease, but it does look like one to me.

cynthia_h
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It may or may not be a disease; it's hard to tell from the photo.

However, many tomato growers remove the leaves from the bottom 10 to 12 inches of the plant to avoid soil splashback. The soil *can* carry fungi to the plant.

At the same time, it's not a good idea to remove more than one-third of a plant's leaves at once; the plant needs that photosynthetic capacity to remain alive, much less to grow. So...I would remove the lowest branch or the lowest branches, moving up from the bottom, until I had removed one-third of the leaves.

See if there's any improvement.

Wait for the plant to put out more leaves. Remove the lowest leaves again, if they're within the 10- to 12-inch distance from the ground.

Good luck.

Cynthia

The Helpful Gardener
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It could very well be the first stages of early blight, from the spotting and yellowing...climbing from the bottom of the plant...

Milk, mixed with water, one to ten. This does two things; supplies calcium in a very solublized form for the plant (calcium deficiency is a common issue in early blight), and encourages the milk hungry Lactobacillus bacteria, which have anti-fungal properties (ever wonder why yogurt never goes bad?) and colonize leaf surfaces (or the phyllosphere as we plant geeks like to call it... :roll: )

Then mulch that soil with something. Grass clipping is better than nothing, but transfers some weed seed to the bed. A perfectly good use for paper from your paper shredder... DO NOT use wood mulches as they can cause soils to lock up nitrogen; just saw a post like that the other day. DO NOT use the ground up tire mulch as it has asenic and chromium and other toxic junk in it. Not just around food plants DO NOT use that garbage... I use my composted yard waste, as it is free and reasonably plentiful (but as I get better at making it and find more uses, I have actually been eyeballing stuff in other people's yard's...that nice pile of leaves at Maryann's, the dump heap at Dick's house... DO NOT tell my wife... :lol: But I digress...This is a splash-up disease, so stop the splashing with a good water permeable mulch...

HG
Scott Reil

bbingham
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Joined: Thu May 28, 2009 10:49 pm
Location: Richmond, VA

Thank you so much! I have removed the bottom most branches ... also, I have straw hay - would that work?

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N2H2o
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Location: Pasadena Ca

helpfulgardener i too eye ball peoples yards and green waste bin's.
i have a customer whom unknowingly donates a 55 gallon bin of oak leaves and grass once a week to my mulch pile... :)
Been gardening all my life and cant get enough of it.

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rainbowgardener
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"stealing" people's yard waste

I also sometimes pick up and take home bags of fall leaves that people put out at the curb in yard waste bags. :) It's great for my compost pile and for mulching. I don't have a lot of leaves myself except for the back half of my lot which is woodland shade garden and those leaves stay where they fall.

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