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lwerbyj
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Location: Elkhart, IN

I'm a newbie.... please help!!

I've never planted a garden before. I'm planning on planting Zucchini, Cukes, Red Bell Peppers, Yellow Bell Peppers, Green Peppers and Tomatoes. Can anyone office some helpful advice? You know... do's and don'ts. Thanks in advance!!! :D

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hendi_alex
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Draw a four foot circle around the zucchini and pant nothing nearer. Keep tomato plants at least three feet apart, and trim lower leaves so that they don't contact the ground. Throw a handful of lime in the bottom of the planting hole of the tomato and mix into the soil. Pay attention to tomato vine type, indeterminate or deteminate and support accordingly. Plant cucumbers in small groups of two or thee plants and give them a circle of at least six feet if you grow standard vine size plants. Cucumber appreciate late afternoon shade if available, or perhaps plant the tomatoes to the west of the cucumbers, and the tomatoes will give some shade. Bell peppers like to stay moist but not wet. A red bell pepper is simply a ripe green pepper. All bell peppers ripen from green to some other color, usually red, but anywhere from yellow, orange, red, black, and more. Anyway, there is not real reason to plant both a red and a green bell pepper as they are basically the same thing, but the reds are named varieties because of their superior color or other qualities.
Last edited by hendi_alex on Tue May 19, 2009 4:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

chefshelle
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One tip is not to overfertilize your pepper. They will just have nicer leaves, etc, but not produce as much of the vegetable.


One great tip for everyone...

How do you tell the difference between a male and female pepper?

By the number of humps on the bottom. Males have 3, females have 4.

Males are sweeter and better raw, females are the ones to cook with!

No offense to anyone, but the way I remember is the male has three humps, and males have 3 legs!!!
Michele

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CheapWholesaleTools.com

TZ -OH6
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Much of Indiana has limestone bedrock. If you are in this region you do not need lime in with your tomatoes. If you add lime it could raise the pH and cause problems with nutrient uptake. Always get a soil test before adding anything other than compost or fertilizer or you could do long term damage to the soil.

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N2H2o
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Michelle thanks for that tip..., Learn something new everyday....
Been gardening all my life and cant get enough of it.

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lwerbyj
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Very helpful information. Thank you!!

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hendi_alex
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I forgot to mention, that if space is a problem, you can always allow vining plants like cucumbers to grow on a trellis. Someone asked a limited space question the other day, and it took another poster's response, to make that solution click, as I've not grown vertical cucumbers in a few years. But there are definite advantages to doing so. Aside from freeing up space, one advantage is that when cucumbers grow on a trellis, they are not in contact with the hot ground, and the vines tend to hold up longer into the summer heat.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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