pepper4
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Location: Ohio

peppers

We have been getting decent temps during the day and it looks like we're going to be in the 70's according to the 5 day forcast. Problem is the lows are still hi 40's and some 50's. I really need to get my peppers in the ground but not sure if I should wait alittle longer. Any advice :?:
Bambi

QueenGreenisey
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Joined: Fri May 01, 2009 5:38 pm
Location: Detroit, MI

Well last year I planted my peppers directly in thr ground, with no success at all. This year I did seedlings indoors, but I'm waiting until the temp hits 80 to move them outside. I'm looking around June 2

pepper4
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Joined: Fri Mar 20, 2009 12:08 pm
Location: Ohio

Thanks! I also planted mine from seed and they are about 8- 12 inches tall and I am seeing buds on quite a few of them. I suppose I should wait. Just eager but I don't want to chance loosing them. Good luck with your peppers :wink:
Bambi

TZ -OH6
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Location: Mid Ohio

I put mine in two days ago, after the last frost. They have been outside hardening off for a couple of weeks with nights in the mid to high 40s with no trouble so I'm not worried about them. The soil is pretty warm.



Edit: Oops, just saw the weather report. We might get frost on Sunday. The Weather Channel info on Yahoo is consistently warmer than the local newsman, but the Newsman is usualy more accurate.

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rainbowgardener
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Location: TN/GA 7b

peppers

mine have been in the ground more than a week. We are still having some night time temps in the 40's sometimes. the plants are doing fine and have buds on them. I know they say not to do that, but it's always worked for me as long as they are well hardened off first.

2cents
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Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:04 pm
Location: Ohio

I set a little guy(2 inch tall) in the ground April 26, he didn't make it.

Set the bigger plants out to harden on May 3rd. Planted them May 12.
So far so good. Thought a couple of them look as if they started to grow a bit today.
Frankly I think I could have gotten them out earlier, but they were too small and would have needed more hardening.

Last year I direct seeded in the ground, took a month for them to sprout(not till mid June) I had given up on them. Then they just started popping up. They were good producers, but late.

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jal_ut
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Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

How many plants are you talking? If its just a few you can set them out and be prepared to cover them if it looks like frost. Keep a close watch on the weather.

One can never tell when the last frost is going to be this year. You can search the archives and find an average last frost date, but there is no guarantee it won't freeze after that date.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

TZ -OH6
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Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2008 11:27 pm
Location: Mid Ohio

The recommended planting dates for an area are usually not average last frost date, but a 95% confidence level, so that about 5 years out of 100 the last frost would be on that date or later. So even if there is a frost around that time you can expect that the weather is generally quite warm and the frost was a freak thing. I think here in the middle of the state our frost free planting date is May 15 or 20 depending on exact location. There are several places on line where you can enter your zip code and get the date.

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