Pepperfreak
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Mar 30, 2009 1:25 am
Location: Greenville, SC

1st time Habanero grower

Hello all, newbie here!

I have alway been a lover of spicy foods, I actually make my own habanero hot sauce at home, and it's all I use for everything, best stuff I've ever had. I've been wanting to go hotter though. The variety I've been using has been the run-of-the-mill (Orange Habanero) kind, but not quite getting the heat I've been looking for. I have ordered some Red Savina Habanero seeds (2nd hottest in the world)(Bhut Jolokias sold out right now), and have already done extensive research on cultivating my own little mini pepper farm.

From all the research I've done, and all the specifics I have received, I am led to believe that Habaneros are not exactly as sturdy as other Chile plants, and most Capsicum Chinense variety are harder to grow. Now the seeds I have ordered are much more expensive than just any pepper seed, and I want to make sure everything is right, but I'm also going to need a LOT of peppers, so I want to make sure I have a large yield per plant, as well as ensuring they hit close to their peak of 577,000 SHU. (that statement may sound weird, but it has been recorded that even New Mexico State U Chile Institute was only able to reach 200,000SHU with Red Savinas, 1/3 of their potential)

So my 1st 3 questions for helpful gardeners(as I'm sure there will be many more):
1)is it true that Capsicum Chinense are tough to grow to their full ability?

2)In my busy lifestyle (and inexperience with plants as I have killed many), the watering regiment...: soil should never be dry, but never soggy, ....has anyone used the "watering globes" do they work well?

3)Using extra nutrients....I've heard to go easy on the nitrogen, use a NPK like 6-10-10 ratio or something I can find close to it....But I've also red the opposite. I'm sure this could effect the SHU a lot. I've been told using too much Nitrogen will yield large leaves, large plants, and small fruit. But then I've also guessed that small fruit is hotter.....any input?

4)Any other tips or hints would be LOVELY

Sincerly David in SC
"300,000 SHU is not enough?!?"
--my wife

User avatar
hendi_alex
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 3567
Joined: Sun Jul 06, 2008 11:58 am
Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

I've never grown habaneros but have noticed with my jalapeno's that rapid lush growth gives rise to mild peppers, while the slower growth like during August and September intensifies the fire. It would seem to me that if the peppers were grown a little on the dry side, maybe under the slightest amount of stress that the peppers could be much hotter. Might be worth an experiment on a single plant, perhaps grown in a container, so that the conditions can be more closely controlled. Also, I've noticed that by far most of the heat in the jalapeno is in the inside ribs and in the seeds. When seeded and with the ribs removed, most often my jalapenos are almost as mild as a bell pepper.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

Pepperfreak
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Mar 30, 2009 1:25 am
Location: Greenville, SC

re

thank you!

re:
It would seem to me that if the peppers were grown a little on the dry side, maybe under the slightest amount of stress that the peppers could be much hotter.
I had heard something like that before...like as soon as fruit is ripe, starve the plant for 1 week before harvesting or something like that...

do you think if I will try this method on one plant of slight stress that I should do it throughout the plants life, or just when it starts producing fruit? Do you think i should you any additional nutrients?
"300,000 SHU is not enough?!?"
--my wife

User avatar
hendi_alex
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 3567
Joined: Sun Jul 06, 2008 11:58 am
Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

My guess, and it is just a guess, that you could wait until the plant was loaded with small peppers, then slow things down and make them work harder to mature.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

Return to “FRUIT FORUM”