jba9597
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how to stop dogs from peeing in my garden

How can I get my dogs to stop peeing on my garden.We got 2 puppies last year so we put up a small fence around our vegetable garden.It does good to keep them out but they pee on the fence and doing so they pee trough the fence on our garden . We have small yard nowhere else to put the garden.It is almost time to start planting how can I get them to stop peeing there.

cynthia_h
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Perhaps some of the techniques and/or products in this thread will be helpful:

https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=9235

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

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hendi_alex
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Many dogs ago, when first married, the wife and I decided that female dogs make so much better pets than is the case with male dogs. The fact that females don't hike their legs and mark every square inch of the property is no small factor in that assessment.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

wingsaholic
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keep dogs from peeing on the garden

Feed stores carry an electric fence charger that one can use to keep animals from certain areas. If the animal touches the wire, they get a shock. That should cure the dogs from peeing in the garden. They'll get a shock they'll remember.
Love to raise veggies for home use.

cynthia_h
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wingsaholic, the original poster is talking about his own dogs, who are only 1 year old and still very trainable.

An electric fence doesn't sound like a very humane alternative. It will instill fear in the dogs which may carry over to other aspects of their behavior and intensify the pee problem, not alleviate it.

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

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hendi_alex
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An electric fence would probably work very well. I used to have a yellow lab who was a digger. We fenced in about two and a half acres around to house and she just dug right under. No matter what kind of barrier or remediation the dog continued to outwit us. We eventually placed an electric fence around the perimeter. She may have touched the fence once or twice but animals can hear the sixty cycle hum when a fence is live. She knew when the fence was on and never bothered to test it again. Repeatedly shocking an animal might be inhumane, but one or two touches and then avoidance perfectly acceptable IMO, expecially when the shock from an electric fence is so mild. I've touched an electric fence many times, have grabbed the fence with both hands before, and on one occasion many years ago hit a live fence wire while taking a pee. There is certainly nothing damaging that comes from an electric fence.

Alternatively, you could move the fence out a couple of feet further and allow a two or three foot buffer between fence and garden. You could hang shade cloth, lattice, construct a wooden fence, other other such remedy. It seems this problem has many fairly simple solutions.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

cynthia_h
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hendi_alex wrote:Alternatively, you could move the fence out a couple of feet further and allow a two or three foot buffer between fence and garden. You could hang shade cloth, lattice, construct a wooden fence, other other such remedy. It seems this problem has many fairly simple solutions.
I think this may work for young dogs who are still trainable. They can learn to recognize the "boundary."

I have no fences, but use raised beds. 5-year-old boy dog, all 105 or so pounds of him, *could* just step into the beds and destroy them by simply lying down. But he never has, even though last year was the first year he'd ever seen these "things" with plants growing in them.

He (and my 9-year-old girl dog) comes outside with me when I work with the plants and watches carefully, so he knows this is something "Mommy" is working on. He has *never* peed on the veggies in the raised beds, but *has* peed on the weeds just outside of them! :) His personal "weed control program," I guess. :lol:

Hey, he can take out the oxalis and valerian any time he wants to, as far as I'm concerned. I'll take all the help, however fashioned, I can get!

But the best part is: when the Romas *finally* came into season in October and early November, some of them fell onto the gardening soil before I could pick them. Vergil LOVES fallen tomatoes, esp. when "Mommy" presents them as a treat. And he has NOT helped himself--although he has no such compunction about loaves of bread in the kitchen...

So it may be easier to train the young dogs about the boundary than the OP thinks. Setting the garden off with a buffer zone and then, in successive seasons, decreasing that buffer zone, sounds good.

What breed/size are these 1-year-olds? Are they of a usually trainable breed or a more independently-minded breed?

Cynthia H.
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hendi_alex
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Our two mid sized dachshunds visit the raised beds, though have never caused any problem there. They are females, so any territorial marking is minimal. I suspect that their visits into the garden are most likely in search of their favorite treat, kitty nuggets. Yuk! They are giving me quite a service by removing those, though the dogs do so often want to lick my face afterwards.

Talk about barely trainable dogs. It takes a year or longer to house train a typical dachshund and even after that period they still have accidents from time to time. I'm not sure that they are so dumb, though that may be the case, but they seem to be very cat like in their independence. They are always eager to please, as long as what is asked matches their interests or agenda. They also happen to be a breed that becomes very addictive to their human families.

Meet the family:

Kirby. She is pretty old, around 13 years.

[img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3604/3379567288_8c84ca4678.jpg[/img]

Miss Cleo, under two years.
[img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3598/3379567876_033de62221.jpg[/img]

Slim, who is no longer so slim!
[img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3590/3378752109_8842879de2.jpg[/img]

K.C., which stands for Kirby's Cat, has such disdain for humans. Was unusually cooperative for this photo, without the usual contemptuous look on her face.

[img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3613/3378752829_f0225eefd2.jpg[/img]
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

jba9597
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thanks for all the info. I need a taller fence now last year when I got the pups a small fence was good. but now my great dane is 13 months and he steps over the 2 foot fence doesn't need to jump. I heard about a spray from petco that they do not like. and will not pee there I do not like the idea of electric fence. I have small kids but it might be good to keep them out of the garden too.just kidding

mbaker410
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Location: Baltimore, MD

Dogs despise Cayenne pepper! If you mix enough cayenne to water and spray the boundary of the fence and frequently enough the dogs should stay away. It does not hurt them at all its just like putting on spicy fingernail polish on girls who bite their nails. Its just uncomfortable for them.

Also pet stores sell pee posts which attracts them to that spot instead.

Christine1950
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don't want to sound nasty, BUT as a dog owner, you are the boss, teach your dogs where they can go. Give them their own area. My rottie would never think about pee-ing on my plants, she knows better, she isnt perfect I must admit, if I don't watch her and correct her she will eat my tomato's right off the vine LOL....



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