pedenfarm
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2008 6:52 pm
Location: lake elmore vermont

WHAT IS IT??? photo included

I posted earlier about this but did not include a photo. This is growing on the side of my barn in vermont. What is it? Help me out!

The spikes are rubbery and don't hurt at all.

Thanks!

[img]https://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a214/mollysnanny/whatisit.jpg[/img]

dinker
Senior Member
Posts: 178
Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2008 1:36 pm
Location: ks

Sorry im no help cant say that ive ever seen that plant before.

canuck
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Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 3:15 pm
Location: interior of BC, Canada

re:what is it

You didn't say if it was growing on a bush,tree, vine??
It looks like a chestnut to me but they grow on a tree.
That is the only idea I have

pedenfarm
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Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2008 6:52 pm
Location: lake elmore vermont

it is growing on a vine similar to a pumpkin, melon ... etc. it is growing on the side of a barn with a large pong near by so the ground is moist --- not muddy just moist

cynthia_h
Super Green Thumb
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Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 11:02 pm
Location: El Cerrito, CA

The tendrils, leaves, vining quality, and a weird tingling in my brain led me to think "cucurbit."

DH (on vacation this week) had a few minutes while I was cleaning up in the kitchen, and he found this UCLA Botanical Garden description of the Cucurbitaceae:

https://www.botgard.ucla.edu/html/botanytextbooks/economicbotany/Cucurbita/index.html

And, as an added bonus, this link from that site w/regard to veggies found in Africa yielded the following photograph:

https://www.botgard.ucla.edu/html/botanytextbooks/economicbotany/Cucurbita/b1250tx.html

Maybe this is your Mystery Vegetable?

Cynthia H.
USDA Zone 9, Sunset Zone 17

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NEWisc
Senior Member
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Joined: Thu Feb 21, 2008 7:10 pm
Location: WI z4

There is a widely distributed U.S. native called Wild Cucumber (Echinocystis lobata); compare your plant to this photo and see what you think:

https://plants.usda.gov/java/largeImage?imageID=eclo_002_ahp.tif

Edited for spelling.
Last edited by NEWisc on Sat Sep 06, 2008 3:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
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cynthia_h
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7501
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 11:02 pm
Location: El Cerrito, CA

Another interesting plant is the kiwano, or African horned cucumber (cucumis metulliferous). Other names are melano, jelly melon, hedged gourd, or English tomato (!).

Wikipedia entry under "horned melon."

Although the photo at Wiki shows little nubs rather than wicked thorns, I had the letter "K" in mind and suddenly this afternoon, I remembered it....

You probably don't have kiwano, not growing on its own, but it's clearly a relative of your little guy.

Cynthia

Gardener Don
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Posts: 66
Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 2:05 pm
Location: Southern Illinois, zone 5b

Looks like plain ole jimson weed seed to me. Let us know what you find out.

para_chan
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Location: Jacksonville, NC

If it's a wild cucumber-can you eat it?

eshenry
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Location: Tennessee

wild cucumber. Jimson does not have tendrils

https://www.theheartofnewengland.com/images/Wildflowers-wild_cucumber.JPG
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mr_tumnas
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Location: Louisiana

Yep. It's a wild cucumber, Echinocystis lobata
https://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ECLO&photoID=eclo_002_ahp.tif

It is NOT edible. The fruit is toxic.

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