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Location: Midcoast Maine

Why is my clematis virginiana not blooming?

I planted a clematis virginana 3 years ago in mid-coast Maine, Zone 5. My soil is acidic so I've added lime but no fertilizer except compost. The vine has grown profusely each year in partial sun but with not a single bloom. Can anyone have any ideas why or give me any suggestions on what I might try? Thanks in advance for your help.

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hendi_alex
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I had a similar situation with a clematis that grew and lived but would not bloom. Added wood ashes for a couple of years and the plant has been covered with blooms ever since. All I did was rake the ashes in the soil for about a foot around the plant but stayed a few inches away from the stem and root ball so as not to disturb the plant too much. The same result could possibly be obtained by applying any ammendment high in phosphorus and potassium which promote root growth and bloom. Bone meal and/or superphosphate may be worth a try.

Alex

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Location: WI z4

This vine likes a lot of sun, at least with respect to flower production. I have vines in both full sun and part shade. The vines in full sun are usually covered with flowers, those in part shade produce very few flowers. Vegetative growth is good in both locations. If you can, try a spot with more sun.
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hendi_alex
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I've always heard, wrt clematis, that they like their feet in the shade and their head in the sun. Also, they tend to be temperamental about being moved. My plant that now blooms freely and has for years, gets direct sun about two hours per day and gets filtered or indirect light for the rest of the time. Is totally shaded from morning through early afternoon and then from about 2:30 p.m. on is shaded under the canopy of a huge oak tree. The plant gives a hundred or more blooms per year, and in peak bloom you can barely see the leaves for the blossoms. So IMO mostly filtered light should be o.k. but dense shade or mostly shade would be a problem.

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Thanks for the good input. The vines actually get quite a bit of sun....morning sun on the east side of their fence and afternoon sun on the west side. I'll definitely try the wood ashes or some super phosphate. The root system is already incredible; in fact, I'm worried that it may become a problem with nearby plants. It's also already moved down the fence. It's pretty, rambunctious foliage, but I'd love to see the bloom!

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