Multix
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New Bonsai owner: Yellow leafs forming on Chinese Elm.

Hi I am new to Bonsai trees and bout 2 from Ikea which seemed to be in great shape. I have heard about not buying from a supermarket like that because of specific problems but my tree didn't seem to have any of them. I do not realy know what type of tree it is because it never said on the label nor can i find one yet similar to go off. I have recently started to see some yellow leafs appearing on both my trees which easily drop and are bright yellow like the below pic shows.

[img]https://img523.imageshack.us/img523/4701/s5030043sz5.th.jpg[/img]

That isn't the place were I leave it by the way i just placed it their for a better picture.

Another picture of the whole tree.

[img]https://img291.imageshack.us/img291/5679/s5030044et4.th.jpg[/img]

And another of the compost which isn't realy that inorganic so takes alot longer to drain water though i have been following the watering sojestions on this forum about leaving the surface to dry slightly and then thoroughly watering the plant twise but leaving a 10 - 20 minute gap inbetween. Does that sound correct?

[img]https://img528.imageshack.us/img528/4869/s5030045jq6.th.jpg[/img]

As you can see some of the leafs are on top of the soil that have fallen off. I do not see any brown, dry or crispy type of leafs but only bright or dull yellow ones :shock: im realy confused as to what this is caused by. I hope one of you can help me with this problem and thanks in advance.

P.S. Sorry if this message is tricky to understand I am in a bit of a rush.

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Gnome
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Multix,

Hello and welcome to the site. Your photos are large and I'm still on dial-up. :cry: Then two of them are out of focus. Please read [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3557]this thread[/url] to learn about taking better pictures. If you are able please reduce future photos somewhat as well, thanks.

Your tree is almost certainly a Chinese Elm, Ulmus parvifolia, Look [url=https://www.bonsai4me.com/SpeciesGuide/Ulmus.html]here[/url] for some basic information.
I have been following the watering sojestions on this forum about leaving the surface to dry slightly and then thoroughly watering the plant twise but leaving a 10 - 20 minute gap inbetween. Does that sound correct?
At first blush this seems pretty reasonable but you must realize that the surface of the soil will appear drier than the body of the soil. Look a little deeper than the surface. Yellowing leaves can indicate over-watering and from the looks of your soil I would say it is pretty likely the case. Let it dry out more in between waterings. Try using the dowel rod/chopstick method to monitor the condition of the soil below the surface.

Norm
Last edited by Gnome on Fri Jul 06, 2007 11:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Multix
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Hiya thanks for the information my friend. I am going to be posting some images soon of the roots and the soil to make sure they are healthy. Is a chinese elm good for indoor growing?

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Gnome
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Multix,
Hiya thanks for the information my friend.
You're welcome.
Is a chinese elm good for indoor growing?
You must remember that no tree will be at its best indoors. Some will do very well if certain requirements are met, some will adjust but not thrive and others will fail, if not sooner then later.

Chinese Elm is a species that can adapt to indoor culture if handled correctly. Lighting is probably the most important issue. Some form of supplemental lighting will be all but a necessity. The more effort/expense you go to in this regard the better the tree will respond. Look [url=https://bonsaihunk.8m.com/info/IndoorLight.html]here[/url] for information regarding indoor lighting.

Humidity will also be an issue as our homes are very dry. This can be addressed by using a humidity tray.

Are you keeping the tree outside during the summer?

Norm

Multix
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Thanks for the lighting information. I am not keeping the tree outside because I do not want the neighbouring pets to soil on my tree and kill it or for it to get a bug infestation. Also were I live in Manchester is pritty cold and lately there has been alot of bad weather.

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Gnome
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Multix,
I live in Manchester is pritty cold and lately there has been alot of bad weather.
I keep my Chinese Elm outside during all but the dead of winter when it is moved to an unheated garage so don't feel that the tree cannot handle the elements it can.

I have not had a lot of difficulty with insects either. My biggest problem has been the occasional bout of black spot fungus. As far as pets are concerned you will have to make that call but your tree will do much better outside during the summer.

Others who keep them inside during the winter sometimes allow them to experience a few frosts in the fall before bringing them inside for the winter.

Norm

Multix
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Hi the only problem here in the UK at the moment is we are having alot of flash floods and i wouldn't like to see my bonsai swept away :lol: but failing the outside could it still survive inside? I have also cut back on the watering to make sure i aint overwattering the trees and cut some of the foilage off etc to allow more light to more new and smaller foilage and reduce the stress of to much growth on the tree.

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Gnome
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Multix,
but failing the outside could it still survive inside?
Yes, if you address the lighting and humidity issues that I noted earlier then it can be done.

Norm

Multix
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I think i have spotted the culprit, today i was looking at the leafs and noticed a few very small white specs that were moving pritty quick across the leaves and were on alot of the leaves :(. I do not spot any type of webbing though but my conclusion is spider mites in the early stages of development. Do you know of any good solution to kill these little critters? i am going to put my trees outside now the weather is better and see if any preditor bugs come along and eat them or if they will die off with the humidity... but i dono what will happen :(.

tommywing
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The best thing you can do if you can't get your hands on any suitable insecticide is use washing up liquid mixed with water and spray the plant with a mister.

I had the exact same problem, and if you get them early I think it does a great deal of good.

That's the advice I was given anyway!

JoeLewko
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I use Schultz's Houseplant and Garden spray. This is a link to a pic of what i have.
https://homeharvest.com/homeharvest2000pics/schultzGShouseplantgarden15.jpg
They recently changed the bottle (same stuff inside though), it used to be in a round yellow bottle, but it's the same stuff, and works well. Also, when i bought it form the garden store, the guy told me to spray outdoor plants after the sun goes down.

Joe

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Gnome
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Multix,

Please consider utilizing the least offensive measures first before moving on to harsher methods. Chinese Elms are reputed to be sensitive to some insecticides. Besides, it's a better approach all around.

Norm

Multix
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I am confused on to what these bugs may be they are very tiny like the size of a full stop and some are smaller and they are bright white in colour. But i do not see any webs underneath the leaves or branches nor do i feel any sticky substances on the leaves. Is all they are doing is eating the leaves and causing leaves to go bright yellow and die :O. Any idea on what they can be.

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Gnome
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Multix,
I am confused on to what these bugs may be...Any idea on what they can be.
In your previous post you seemed to feel that they were spider mites. It is difficult to diagnose a problem from just a few paragraphs and not seeing the damage. Even then it is often hit or miss.

Look to [url=https://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=spider+mites&gbv=2]Google[/url] for help identifying the pest.

The measures outlined in the previous link I provided (water blast & insecticidal soap) are common first steps in dealing with many critters even if you do not know their name.

Norm

Multix
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Hi sorry i havn't posted here for a while as i have been offline for 2 weeks :(. But i did what you said gnome and put my bonsai trees outside. The trees seem to be doing very well being out and the amount of yellow foilage that was falling off indoors as reduced alot to only the od one now and then and to my suprise new leafes are growing :).

There is just one more thing though that is bothering me. Under the soil seems to be a few little white mite type things that are pritty darn fast because as soon as you go near them they run off quick. They seem to go mostly on the pot itself than on the soil but there is some that are scuttling around on the soil. Do you have any idea of what these little critters may well be? they are about 1 or 2 mm long and white a bit like the tiny bugs you get in garden soil?

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Gnome
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Multix,
Under the soil seems to be a few little white mite type things that are pritty darn fast because as soon as you go near them they run off quick. They seem to go mostly on the pot itself than on the soil but there is some that are scuttling around on the soil. Do you have any idea of what these little critters may well be? they are about 1 or 2 mm long and white a bit like the tiny bugs you get in garden soil?
No, I'm sorry I can't help from here. Perhaps with a picture, but even then no guarantees.

It is not uncommon for me to find insects in my pots, I try not to over-react. Usually they seem to pose no threat. Keep a close eye on your tree and continue to try to identify the critters.

Norm

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