MagicDan
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My adventures with a Walsai..

Hey all,

I just purchased a new tree at my local Wal-Mart.

I've done some work with it and then created a web page to further explain and show photos.

If you have a minute, follow the link and then please use the forum for comments and questions.

Thanks in advance for any help...

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First off, I'd like to give you a warm welcome to the forum MD! glad to have you here! :)

Rather than have members bouncing back and forth between your personal site and the forum, for convenience sake I have posted the pics plus the text that goes with it. ;)
I stopped at one of our local Wal-Marts the other day and went browsing thru their nursery. I found this nice little tree and I knew I just had to save it from its potential fate! It looked very healthy and had some new growth visible. I really liked the shape of the tree and knew it had some great potential. It cost me $10.

The first thing I did was to repot the plant. Had to chip away the glued on rocks and then get the root ball out of the plastic pot. Once I did that I exposed more of the trunk. I then wired it into a nice pot and gave it a good soaking. The only other thing I've done to is so far was some minor pruning to get rid of some of the dead twigs. I plan to wait until spring to do any major pruning.

I have had the good fortune to take some basic bonsai lessons from a master. Bill Valavanis lives right around the corner from where I work. I took his introductory classes back in the spring. I ended up with a Japanese Larch, Japanese Maple, Azalea and a Juniper. Since then I've added a couple more maples, cotoneasters, Snow Rose and now my newest addition.

I have no idea what this tree is and would appreciate some help identifying it. Also please use the forum to comment or ask questions.

Thanks in advance for any help.



Notice the trunk in this picture and then compare to the After shots.
[img]https://members.aol.com/pixatebay/pix/before2.jpg[/img]

[img]https://members.aol.com/pixatebay/pix/before3.jpg[/img]

[img]https://members.aol.com/pixatebay/pix/after1.jpg[/img]

[img]https://members.aol.com/pixatebay/pix/after2.jpg[/img]

[img]https://members.aol.com/pixatebay/pix/after3.jpg[/img]

[img]https://members.aol.com/pixatebay/pix/leaves.jpg[/img]

opabinia51
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I would give this tree a heavy pruning. Take out any branches that cross eachother.

Sharp
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Looks like an elm to me.

ynot
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I stopped at one of our local Wal-Marts the other day and went browsing thru their nursery. I found this nice little tree and I knew I just had to save it from its potential fate! It looked very healthy and had some new growth visible. I really liked the shape of the tree and knew it had some great potential. It cost me $10.
Allways fun to browse the big box stores :), 10$ well spent.
It does look healthier than most walsai though I admit I am most emphatically not a fan of the 'digital 5' shaped trees.
I have no idea what this tree is and would appreciate some help identifying it. Also please use the forum to comment or ask questions.
To my eye, You are now the proud owner of a Chinese Elm.
Here is a species guide about them: https://www.bonsai4me.com/SpeciesGuide/Ulmus.html
Notice the trunk in this picture and then compare to the After shots.
I moved your before and after a bit closer together.

[img]https://members.aol.com/pixatebay/pix/before2.jpg[/img]


[img]https://members.aol.com/pixatebay/pix/after3.jpg[/img]


The first thing I did was to repot the plant. Had to chip away the glued on rocks and then get the root ball out of the plastic pot. Once I did that I exposed more of the trunk. I then wired it into a nice pot and gave it a good soaking. The only other thing I've done to is so far was some minor pruning to get rid of some of the dead twigs. I plan to wait until spring to do any major pruning.
Magicdan, Three things you have done here were excellent decisions IMO :

1.] Got rid of the bloody glued rocks. [ :!: ]

2.] Repotted in to some beautiful soil! [Just look at that proper soil people. 8) ]

3.] Secured your tree in the pot, It is surprising how few people do this. Fewer still than the amount using proper soil- I would wager.

Lowering the soil level around the tree has given a dramatic improvement to the movement [Not that this tree was lacking any in movement..:lol:]

How did the nebari look? [surface roots] Any possibilities? How did the root system look? {Lots of thick storage roots or a mass of fine and fiberous feeder roots?}
I am assuming there was no root pruning involved [none mentioned.]

Considering you just repotted, I would not stress the tree any further with a heavy pruning considering it has most likely not had the best care previous to it's move [Despite it's apparent health, Survive does not=Thrive.]
Besides, If it's root system cannot carry the load required of it, IT will decide which branches to let die off. They may possibly be the ones you had wanted to keep, [post pruning] So it is better to not limit your available options at this point IMO.

On an aesthetic level I think the pot is a bit too bright for this tree.
Though I see the how it compliments the flecks of color within the trunk, It borders on overpowering the tree due to the vibrance of the pots color.
It might just be the glare, But I continually find my eye drawn to the pot.

What are your eventual styling plans MD?
As I stated before I am not in love with the '5' shape so I would have one of two rather radical ideas [Radical to some perhaps] in mind for this if it were mine... :twisted:
I have had the good fortune to take some basic bonsai lessons from a master. Bill Valavanis lives right around the corner from where I work. I took his introductory classes back in the spring. I ended up with a Japanese Larch, Japanese Maple, Azalea and a Juniper. Since then I've added a couple more maples, cotoneasters, Snow Rose and now my newest addition.
I will not discuss my obvious envy here. :P :wink:
Thanks in advance for any help.
:lol:- Just throwing my $.02 on the table.. :D
ynot

MagicDan
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Walsai

Thanks to the webmaster for moving the pics and text. I haven't had a chance to set up an account at a pic hosting site.

When you take Bonsai classes, especially from someone like Bill Valavanis, you learn a lot in a very short period of time. I know I still have much to learn but I'm pretty confident with the knowledge I have at the moment. Thanks Bill :D

I haven't had time to give much thought to the future of the tree. Guess my question would be....

1) The tree needs to be outside and I have it there now. Is it OK to do some heavy pruning at this time of year or should I wait until spring.

ynot...you think a poor boy like me has unlimited pots to choose from?? :lol:

That pot was the only one that I had that was big enough. I promise that after I sell a few more cars and can afford more pots I'll put it in something else!! :D

I am very glad I found this forum and truly appreciate all the comments and advice that everyone has given. Keep 'em coming. It's how we all learn!

MD

MagicDan
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stupid me

I just reread ynot's reply and found the answer to my question about pruning.

The roots were nice and fine, not heavy. I didn't do any root pruning. Just wanted to get it out of the terrible condition it was in.

I will hold off until spring and keep my fingers crossed that it survives the winter.

If you look at the top of the tree, someone cut the original top out and there are many cross brances everywhere. Eventually I will have to do some heavy pruning.

Thanks again ynot.

MagicDan
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indoors or outdoors

Just read the info on Chinese Elms that ynot linked me to. They talk about having this variety both indoors and outdoors. The Wal-Mart nursery is unheated so I assume this tree is somewhat acclimated to the cold.

What is the consensus here?? Should I put it outside? Do I have enough time before the really cold weather hits or should I keep it inside this winter and take it out in the spring?

It's outside now and the temp has been in the 40's for the past few days. I live along the south shore of Lake Ontario so we aren't in any danger of frost for a while.

ynot
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Re: indoors or outdoors

The roots were nice and fine, not heavy. I didn't do any root pruning. Just wanted to get it out of the terrible condition it was in.

I will hold off until spring and keep my fingers crossed that it survives the winter.

If you look at the top of the tree, someone cut the original top out and there are many cross brances everywhere. Eventually I will have to do some heavy pruning.
Again, I cannot emphasize enough what a favor you did for your tree with the new soil. This is an example to be followed!

When pruning time comes around, Do keep in mind just how prolific this guy is wrt coming back strong.
This is indicated by the strong growth around the chop 8).
This should encourage you to be somewhat fearless wrt pruning.
1) ynot...you think a poor boy like me has unlimited pots to choose from??

That pot was the only one that I had that was big enough. I promise that after I sell a few more cars and can afford more pots I'll put it in something else!!
:lol: I understand the finances, In fact a plastic pot would be absolutely fine [Easy on the wallet also.]
I have heaps of stuff growing happily in plastic as it is not ready for a bonsai pot anyway.
My trees don't seem to mind one bit. :wink:
MagicDan wrote:What is the consensus here?? Should I put it outside? Do I have enough time before the really cold weather hits or should I keep it inside this winter and take it out in the spring?
Since it has been acclimating to the dropping temps and lower light levels outside-Continuing that would be the best bet.

If you have a screened unheated porch or a garage that would be fine although if you feel the need you could place the whole thing in a container of some sort that has mulch in the bottom and surrounding the pot, cover the top of the soil and up to the first branch. Do not use straw, It will rot after it gets wet. This would provide some temp insulation. I suggest a 2$ [url=https://froogle.google.com/froogle?q=pond+baskets&hl=en&lr=&safe=off&sa=X&oi=froogle&ct=title/url]pond basket[/url]from wal-mart/lowes/h-despot.

What ever you use, It's required that water can drain through it. [BTW, The pond baskets make excellent training pots also-Talk about drainage!]
Keep in mind that for the most part w/ cold hardy trees it is not the temperature itself that is the danger [unless unusually excessive] it is the wind.
Some [small amount] moisture will still be lost from sun/wind and frozen roots have no way to replace this loss. So a sheltered area if possible is best. Snow is an excellent insulator by the way.
Keep in mind also that after your tree loses its leaves [No leaves= No photosythesis] it does not require sunlight. So even the dark garage will be fine.
Here are two fine articles wrt overwintering:
https://www.bonsai4me.com/Basics/Basics_WinterCare.html
https://www.evergreengardenworks.com/overwint.htm
Thanks again ynot.
You sir, Are very welcome :!:
ynot
Last edited by ynot on Wed Oct 25, 2006 3:55 am, edited 1 time in total.

ynot
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No actual trees were pruned during this virtual adventure :)

Magicdan,

I took the liberty of virtually fooling with your tree a bit.
I am absolutely terrible at this so please forgive the 'Muppet Motif' my virts tend to have.. :oops:

I will edit in more text to explain if anyone is interested, I didn't complete the foliage so you can see the structure of the tree a bit better...

Here is your original [post repot]:

[url=https://img224.imageshack.us/my.php?image=magicdantreere9.jpg][img]https://img224.imageshack.us/img224/5685/magicdantreere9.th.jpg[/img][/url]

Just a pair of ideas:

[url=https://img164.imageshack.us/my.php?image=magicdantreevirt1sv4.jpg][img]https://img164.imageshack.us/img164/2499/magicdantreevirt1sv4.th.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://img224.imageshack.us/my.php?image=magicdantreevirt2lh2.jpg][img]https://img224.imageshack.us/img224/208/magicdantreevirt2lh2.th.jpg[/img][/url]

Whoops :oops:
[url=https://img183.imageshack.us/my.php?image=magicdantreevirt3co8.jpg][img]https://img183.imageshack.us/img183/1069/magicdantreevirt3co8.th.jpg[/img][/url]
I forgot to reposition the tree in the first virt, Seems like a good time to point out the importance of postioning a tree properly within a pot.
To my eye this looks placement looks more harmonious wrt the shape of the tree. The first one looks all out of balance.
To be honest it is still not quite right...

As I look at it now there are a few changes I would make to the second one.
Hindsight, You know :P :wink:.
EDIT: So I changed it a bit, There was just too much negative space above the #1 LH branch.
I didn't really want to put bar branches there [Came close though] but it needed something.
This is FAR from the best possibility wrt this tree...Hmmm

[url=https://img151.imageshack.us/my.php?image=magicdantreevirt4pb4.jpg][img]https://img151.imageshack.us/img151/6756/magicdantreevirt4pb4.th.jpg[/img][/url]

Magicdan, Just fooling around a bit with your tree. :twisted:
ynot

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Magic Dan,

I also have an Elm that is reminiscent of yours although the S shape is not nearly as pronounced. My first winter with the tree it was allowed to go fully dormant outside and only then moved to an unheated garage that rarely got below freezing and when it did it was not by much and not for long.

The second winter I mulched it in well and let it overwinter outside along with a cork bark variety that I acquired that year, both trees came through fine. At a bonsai show this summer, however, I met a grower from a nearby state that said that I got lucky in that we had a mild winter that year. I think that the origin of the plant has a lot to do with its level of hardiness.

Right now my trees are still totally unprotected, I think I will err on the side of caution this year and bring them in a little later.

Ynot alluded to a drastic option and I think I see what he is referring to. There is the possibility to do a trunk chop, (or air layer), and remove the exaggerated bend entirely. This will introduce some much needed taper to this tree and if you layer it off you will then have two. I cant tell for certain but the new branch that I am referring to may be damaged and if it is that will probably preclude this possibility. Just something to think about.

Ynot has been after me to post some pics to the new gallery so perhaps I will get some photos of my Elms for you to see soon.

Norm

ynot
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Gnome wrote:Ynot alluded to a drastic option and I think I see what he is referring to. There is the possibility to do a trunk chop, (or air layer), and remove the exaggerated bend entirely. This will introduce some much needed taper to this tree and if you layer it off you will then have two.
Exactly :!:
Gnome wrote: I cant tell for certain but the new branch that I am referring to may be damaged and if it is that will probably preclude this possibility. Just something to think about.
Indeed Gnome, I noticed that also but considering how strongly these respond to hard pruning it is still an option.
This would require two chops though, The first to induce lower budding that could be developed as a leader.
Gnome wrote:Ynot has been after me to post some pics to the new gallery so perhaps I will get some photos of my Elms for you to see soon.
Norm
[url=https://imageshack.us][img]https://img221.imageshack.us/img221/9517/whippinvn9.gif[/img][/url][url=https://imageshack.us][img]https://img228.imageshack.us/img228/6800/rasberrywaggleyn3.gif[/img][/url] :wink:

ynot

MagicDan
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Wow

Wow! Thanks for all the input.

Ynot..
When I took my classes from Bill, he would start each session with a slide show. Most were pics of trees he owns or has visited. However, he is a wizard with Photoshop and created all sorts of stuff that shows the possibilities when contemplating a tree design. I was drawn to the tree partly because of the "S" shape of the trunk but now that I see what you did to it, I can see where it would probably look much nicer if I could get rid of some of the curve. Good thing I have all winter to think about it. :lol:

Gnome..
Thanks for your input and options. My trees are all on a wooden rack that I currently have on the south side of my house. They are out of the wind most of the time and don't get too wet when it rains as they are under the eaves of my house. When the temp drops enough I plan to move the rack into my garage. Unheated with one window. I will be able to go into the garage easily and water when necessary.
I'll look forward to the pics of your elms.

ynot
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Re: Wow

The garage sounds like an excellent place.
MagicDan wrote: I was drawn to the tree partly because of the "S" shape of the trunk but now that I see what you did to it, I can see where it would probably look much nicer if I could get rid of some of the curve. Good thing I have all winter to think about it. :lol:
I agree Bill is a wizard 8) .

I just like virtually fooling around with trees. I find virts really helpfull because you CAN eliminate that branch and see what it looks like.....Without doing actually doing it.

There is alot of freedom that comes with the idea that the change is not permanent.
It allows you to just tweak eternally and then when you go back out on the balcony w/ concave cutters in hand you think "In just three years I will be getting close to the picture I allready have... :roll:
What a hobby..:lol:!

Thank you for the compliment wrt my virts but it is your tree and no doubt you will change your mind many many times wrt what you feel you will do. That is part of the fun too I think.

It is only important that you like where your headed.
Enjoy the journey,
ynot

Petra26
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very cool stuff guys. i like the virts ynot :D very creative and imaginative. excellent work. i don't have yet the crafty eye for bonsai. unable to see all these beautiful possiblities until someone shows me a virt :P i will continue to hone my skills.

p.s. i too have 2 walsais. one is in better condition but still pretty hideous looking. like a short squat table with bushy branches growing around it. nothing as pretty as yours, MagicDan

ynot
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Petra26 wrote:very cool stuff guys. I like the virts ynot :D very creative and imaginative. excellent work.
Thanks, Petra. I assure you it is just luck.
It is SO easy on the cpu, I am completely fearless when I can 'undo' in 2 clicks. :lol: I am also pretty bold when pruning actually... :twisted:
I don't have yet the crafty eye for bonsai. unable to see all these beautiful possiblities until someone shows me a virt :P I will continue to hone my skills.
Everybody has a perspective, You will learn to recognize and articulate/demonstrate it.
Then you will look at full sized trees in an entire new light. 8) Mother Nature does some amazing work. :D
Petra26 wrote:p.s. I too have 2 walsais. one is in better condition but still pretty hideous looking. like a short squat table with bushy branches growing around it. nothing as pretty as yours, MagicDan
Petra, I would be happy to virt your 'red-headed stepchildren-sai'.. :P :wink: If you wish,
Just post them. [I know you love 'em anyway :D ]
ynot

desco976
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Petra26 wrote:very cool stuff guys. I like the virts ynot :D very creative and imaginative. excellent work. I don't have yet the crafty eye for bonsai. unable to see all these beautiful possiblities until someone shows me a virt :P I will continue to hone my skills.

p.s. I too have 2 walsais. one is in better condition but still pretty hideous looking. like a short squat table with bushy branches growing around it. nothing as pretty as yours, MagicDan
Petra

Where do you put your bonsai in the winter time? I have a window well that is about 5ft deep. It's a lower level fire exit. I thought about putting plexiglass over the top of it and placing my elm in that for winter. What do you,or anyone else think?

Petra26
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I have a ficus so i just leave it infront of a bright window. i don't take it outside for winter otherwise it would die :(

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Desco,

This is probably a good location but there are some concerns. Give us a little more information. What side of the house is the window well on? Does it get a lot of sun that would tend to heat up if you cover it with clear plastic? Is it well under the eaves, in other words does snow accumulate in this area? Can any water drain away, is there gravel at the bottom?

An inexpensive thermometer with a remote sensor would come in handy if you can sneak the wire out the window. I use one in my garage to monitor the inside and outside temps.

Norm

desco976
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Gnome wrote:Desco,

This is probably a good location but there are some concerns. Give us a little more information. What side of the house is the window well on? Does it get a lot of sun that would tend to heat up if you cover it with clear plastic? Is it well under the eaves, in other words does snow accumulate in this area? Can any water drain away, is there gravel at the bottom?

An inexpensive thermometer with a remote sensor would come in handy if you can sneak the wire out the window. I use one in my garage to monitor the inside and outside temps.

Norm
Hi Gnome!

The window well is on the east side of the house. It's a pretty dry side of the house. To the left of the window is a Hydrangea bush that somewhat shelters the well from snow. I don't think it gets that much sun, my house is only about 7ft away from the next house. I have low hanging eaves/soffits they are 25inches wide. There is gravel in the bottom of the well. Right now it's filled with about a foot of leaves,which I have neglected to clean out. :) I can easily put a thermometer out there. That's a great idea.

I'm probably making a bigger issue out of this than it needs to be. I haven't had a bonsai in about 5 years. This should be a calming hobby, instead I panic from the time I get one, till it's untimely death. I'm making it much more difficult than it needs to be. I have two Spireas in urns at the end of my driveway. They have been in the same urns for 5 years. If I leave things alone they do fine.

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Desco,

I was concerned that water could accumulate in the well and harm the roots and lower trunk but if there is gravel and it drains well that should not be a problem. My other concern is that if you cover the well with clear plastic too much heat could build up during sunny periods which you don't seem to have an issue with either.

Here is some information to help you make your decision.

[url]https://www.bonsai4me.com/Basics/Basics_WinterCare.html[/url]

[url]https://www.evergreengardenworks.com/overwint.htm[/url]

Norm

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Gnome wrote:Desco,

I was concerned that water could accumulate in the well and harm the roots and lower trunk but if there is gravel and it drains well that should not be a problem. My other concern is that if you cover the well with clear plastic too much heat could build up during sunny periods which you don't seem to have an issue with either.

Here is some information to help you make your decision.

[url]https://www.bonsai4me.com/Basics/Basics_WinterCare.html[/url]

[url]https://www.evergreengardenworks.com/overwint.htm[/url]

Norm
Gnome,

I'm going to get a remote thermometer and see how much it heats up now. That way I'll have a idea of how high the temp will get in the well. Unfortunately I feel it's to late in the season to repot the elm. At this point I just want it to get threw winter,then repot and prune in spring.

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Desco,

I don't know what your weather is like but I wouldn't think you need to be concerned with storage yet. Or are you just getting ready? Make sure you read the links I provided.
Unfortunately I feel it's to late in the season to repot the elm. At this point I just want it to get threw winter,then repot and prune in spring.
I don't see where you mentioned the possibility of a repot, but at any rate you are correct in saying that it is not the correct season. You also might want to read the "sticky threads" regarding repotting and nebari refinement.

Norm

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Gnome wrote:Desco,

I don't know what your weather is like but I wouldn't think you need to be concerned with storage yet. Or are you just getting ready? Make sure you read the links I provided.
Unfortunately I feel it's to late in the season to repot the elm. At this point I just want it to get threw winter,then repot and prune in spring.
I don't see where you mentioned the possibility of a repot, but at any rate you are correct in saying that it is not the correct season. You also might want to read the "sticky threads" regarding repotting and nebari refinement.

Norm
Gnome,

I just happen to mention the repotting thing. I have so many things I'm thinking about that I randomly throw things out there. You are correct, I'm not ready for winter storage yet. I like to have a plan of action well in advance. My "Walsai" is sitting on top of my grill outdoors. The temps don't seem to be falling below 45 right now. It rained all day yesterday,so it got a good soaking.

ynot
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Gnome wrote: My other concern is that if you cover the well with clear plastic too much heat could build up during sunny periods...
This was my first concern also, Temperature fluctuations can really mess with a trees dormancy. IMO your elm would be better off at a consistant 25F rather than temps varying between 30 and 45f {sub-freezing then almost spring temps}. Trees are all about consistancy. :D {That temp swing is hard on pots too.}

Having a roof over your trees head will really help decrease the wind factor which I re: earlier.

From my second post in this very thread:
ynot wrote: if you feel the need you could place the whole thing in a container of some sort that has mulch in the bottom and surrounding the pot, cover the top of the soil and up to the first branch. Do not use straw, It will rot after it gets wet. This would provide some temp insulation. I suggest a 2$ [url=https://froogle.google.com/froogle?q=pond+baskets&hl=en&lr=&safe=off&sa=X&oi=froogle&ct=title/url]pond basket[/url]from wal-mart/lowes/h-despot.

What ever you use, It's required that water can drain through it.

Keep in mind that for the most part w/ cold hardy trees it is not the temperature itself that is the danger [unless unusually excessive] it is the wind.
Some [small amount] moisture will still be lost from sun/wind and frozen roots have no way to replace this loss {As all the available water is also frozen}. So a sheltered area if possible is best.
You could also elevate a mulched pond basket to insure room for drainage [Doesn't sound like that's an issue...Just in case.]

Hopefully you will have a nice solid cold stretch to insure a healthy nap for your tree.

All in all it sounds like you have a pretty good spot. :D
Good luck.
ynot

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ynot wrote:
Gnome wrote: My other concern is that if you cover the well with clear plastic too much heat could build up during sunny periods...
This was my first concern also, Temperature fluctuations can really mess with a trees dormancy. IMO your elm would be better off at a consistant 25F rather than temps varying between 30 and 45f {sub-freezing then almost spring temps}. Trees are all about consistancy. :D {That temp swing is hard on pots too.}

Having a roof over your trees head will really help decrease the wind factor which I re: earlier.

From my second post in this very thread:
ynot wrote: if you feel the need you could place the whole thing in a container of some sort that has mulch in the bottom and surrounding the pot, cover the top of the soil and up to the first branch. Do not use straw, It will rot after it gets wet. This would provide some temp insulation. I suggest a 2$ [url=https://froogle.google.com/froogle?q=pond+baskets&hl=en&lr=&safe=off&sa=X&oi=froogle&ct=title/url]pond basket[/url]from wal-mart/lowes/h-despot.

What ever you use, It's required that water can drain through it.

Keep in mind that for the most part w/ cold hardy trees it is not the temperature itself that is the danger [unless unusually excessive] it is the wind.
Some [small amount] moisture will still be lost from sun/wind and frozen roots have no way to replace this loss {As all the available water is also frozen}. So a sheltered area if possible is best.
You could also elevate a mulched pond basket to insure room for drainage [Doesn't sound like that's an issue...Just in case.]

Hopefully you will have a nice solid cold stretch to insure a healthy nap for your tree.

All in all it sounds like you have a pretty good spot. :D
Good luck.
ynot


ynot

I am trying to take extra measures by putting the lid over the window well. Since I'm on the Wisc. border we get a lot of negative temp days. Keeping the tree at 25 degrees will be a bit of a challenge. My garage isn't insulated so it is only about 5 degrees warmer than the outside. I had mentioned to Gnome, I'm going to be watching the temp of the well everyday.

ynot
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I was in no way suggesting that you do try to maintain 25f, or any temp really. Just making the point that the fluctuation between above and below freezing is worse than a sustained solidly cold temperature.

Sorry if I was unclear about that.

Also why I mentioned the pond basket insulating trick to help keep your tree out of 'dangerous cold'.

Btw, I am from an hour south of Rockford, So I know your weather exactly. With temps like that I am guessing you are far west of the lake. [That big lake :wink: .]
ynot

desco976
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Location: Chicago,Illinois

ynot wrote:I was in no way suggesting that you do try to maintain 25f, or any temp really. Just making the point that the fluctuation between above and below freezing is worse than a sustained solidly cold temperature.

Sorry if I was unclear about that.

Also why I mentioned the pond basket insulating trick to help keep your tree out of 'dangerous cold'.

Btw, I am from an hour south of Rockford, So I know your weather exactly. With temps like that I am guessing you are far west of the lake. [That big lake :wink: .]
ynot
So since you know the area, you can come to my house and winterize this darn tree so I won't be aganizing over this. :D

ynot
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desco976 wrote: So since you know the area, you can come to my house and winterize this darn tree so I won't be aganizing over this. :D
Sure thing, Is tuesday good for you? Just look for my red truck at Cherryvale. It will be there But I will be out of town...[img]https://img142.imageshack.us/img142/42/rasberryxt8.gif[/img] [img]https://img169.imageshack.us/img169/9546/bgrdsmilexz4.gif[/img]
:wink:

desco976
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Elm update

My Elm has been outdoors for the past two weeks. It seems to be doing much better. While it is still losing some leaves, the leaf dropping has slowed down. I can't believe how quickly the soil dries h out even in cold chilly weather. I would of thought the cold temps would of slowed down the water loss. I'll post a pic soon.

MagicDan
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Joined: Tue Oct 17, 2006 9:55 pm
Location: Hilton, NY

elm

I put my elm outside right after I repotted it. Silly thing is sprouting new growth! I live along the south shore of Lake Ontario so we have not had the really cold temps that our area has had. In fact, none of my trees seem to be dropping their leaves as you would expect this time of year in the North East. Of course, most of the real trees around me still have leaves due to the lake moderation in temperature.

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