sugarfree
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snail/slugs pellets vs vegie patch

Hi guys.

Just wondering, I'm using snail/slug pellets on my vegie patch of cabbage, brocolli, cherry tomatos & chilis.

Would it be okay??

its yates blitzem pellets.

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rainbowgardener
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No, not really. Active ingredient is metaldehyde. See this cornell U report on toxicity of metaldehyde:

https://pmep.cce.cornell.edu/profiles/extoxnet/haloxyfop-methylparathion/metaldehyde-ext.html

"Metaldehyde must not be applied to edible parts of plants. "

It is somewhat toxic to humans and very toxic to dogs who might eat it, as well as to birds and other wildlife.

Why not switch to Sluggo? It is iron phosphate, it is safe for people, dogs and wildlife and is a fertilizer ingredient, so it breaks down to feed your soil.

Or type slug control into the Search the Forum feature and find tons that has been written here about beer traps, people's adventures going out at night with flashlights and hand picking them and other methods of control....
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TZ -OH6
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The metaldehyde baits I have used in the past (bug b gone?) drew the slugs from quite a ways away (several feet) and the slugs died within a foot of the baits, so instead of just spreading the stuff around you can set up bait stations to keep the baits protected from unwanted animals.

NewGarden
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sluggo tocix

Even Sluggo now seems to be toxic. Of course they don't want you to know. EDTA is the active ingredient and it becomes active when applied. They snuck it in as an 'inert' ingredient. Apparently, Sluggo in Australia has this chemical listed.

https://www.hostalibrary.org/firstlook/RRIronPhosphate.htm

I used Slug Shields last season and the worked really well. 100% eco-friendly AND they last all season. I got them online.

cynthia_h
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Sad to see that my precautionary practice of not using products with extremely high percentages of "inert" ingredients may yet again have saved my dogs. *sigh*

But no testing on EDTA?!

Here's a post I wrote May 2010 with specifics: https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=134667

I know I took on Sluggo for its 99% "inert" ingredients elsewhere around here; I'll find some of them shortly.

https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=17804
https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=14010

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

DoubleDogFarm
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Release the ducks!

I guess I well stick with the duck patrol. :wink:


Eric

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Kisal
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Ducks are great for slug and snail control, but unfortunately, not every gardener is able to take on animal care in addition to all their other responsibilities. My dogs would never be able to run and play in the yard if I had ducks ... or chickens, for that matter. Any duck in my yard would rapidly become "doggie dinner". :roll:

I don't recommend slug & snail baits other than beer, but back in the bad old days, my neighbors and I would save small jars, such as jelly jars, put a little of the bait in each one, and lay them on their sides in our gardens. Except for the slugs and snails, animals didn't seem to bother the stuff, and it didn't come in contact with the soil or our plants.

A similar method is to cut little half-circles out of the edge of a container such as cottage cheese comes in, place the container lid on the ground with the inside up, lay a little bit of bait in the center of it, then "snap" the container onto it. The snails and slugs could get at the bait through the little half-circle openings.

We liked the jelly jars, though, because, being clear, they weren't so visible and gave the garden a neater appearance. Even so, I no longer use baits. I've found hand-picking the critters to be most effective. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

DoubleDogFarm
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A similar method is to cut little half-circles out of the edge of a container such as cottage cheese comes in, place the container lid on the ground with the inside up, lay a little bit of bait in the center of it, then "snap" the container onto it. The snails and slugs could get at the bait through the little half-circle openings.
and you called it Baits Hotel.


Norman

cynthia_h
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DoubleDogFarm wrote:
A similar method is to cut little half-circles out of the edge of a container such as cottage cheese comes in, place the container lid on the ground with the inside up, lay a little bit of bait in the center of it, then "snap" the container onto it. The snails and slugs could get at the bait through the little half-circle openings.
and you called it Baits Hotel.


Norman
:lol:

Cynthia

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Kisal
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and you called it Baits Hotel.
LMFAO

Whatever works! ;)
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sugarfree
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Seems like i have to hand pick them pellets before its way too late....

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applestar
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Y-yikes! :eek:

garden5
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If you want to hand pick your slugs, it's a good idea to do it at night with a flashlight. This is when the slugs are most active.
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rainbowgardener
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type slug control into the Search the Forum feature and find lots of fun stuff about beer traps and people's adventures out in the garden after midnight with flashlights, picking slugs.... (and other methods!)
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

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cherishedtiger
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Hmmm.... interesting post as I use Corrys Slug and Sail and I use it right in my vegetable garden...
I cant find much information about it but it says its safe for vegetable gardens... any thoughts on this stuff?
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DoubleDogFarm
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I use Corrys Slug and Sail
Double yikes! metaldehyde

Environmental Effects
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Metaldehyde does not present a direct environmental risk to water and soil quality; the compound has a half-life of only several days in soil and is soluble in water. Because it rapidly decomposes to acetaldehyde, it is not persistent in groundwater either (EXTOXNET). However, metaldehyde does pose risks to the health of wildlife.

In addition to laboratory studies on mice and rats, data indicate that the compound is toxic to various other organisms. Although LD50 values, the median lethal dosages, are unavailable for birds, several cases of death have been reported for birds feeding in metaldehyde-treated areas. Likewise, poultry living in exposed areas have shown tremors, muscle spasms, difficulty breathing, and diarrhea. Metaldehyde does not seem to affect aquatic organisms (EXTOXNET). Pelleted baits have been reported to be toxic to multiple organisms. Likewise, these baits are appealing to dogs, and therefore numerous agencies recommend that pets be confined during the application of the chemical.


More here https://toxipedia.org/display/toxipedia/Metaldehyde

Eric

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rainbowgardener
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yup, also see my post at the very beginning of this thread, first response to the OP.
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garden5
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This is why I hesitate to use any kind of fertilizer or "pest spray" even though it is labeled "organic." There are ways a company can sneak some bad stuff into these products and still maintain an "organic" or "all natural" label. For me...I'll stick with good old fashioned egg shells and hand-picking.
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Odd Duck
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Corry's slug and snail death pellets are NOT labeled as organic. While I'm not an organic expert and don't know enough to argue about the iron sulfate slug baits that are labeled organic, we're talking about 2 very different things here.

Metaldehyde (Corry's among others) are highly toxic to many, many species. I have not researched the iron sulfate bait risk to other species, but I definitely know about the metaldehyde toxicity.

So, I would recommend using any slug and snail baits with extreme care, and if hand picking is a viable option, that's always going to be the safest. Beer drowning also seems a safer option (but many dogs will drink beer if given the chance). JMHO
Sharon
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cherishedtiger
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OH... well... um... great now I gotta find something better to use... luckily the animals aren't allowed near the garden, and I do hand wash everything. Any difference between the pellets and the powder? Because I use the powder you sprinkle around everything.
Well I think I will just find something else... don't want anyone getting sick!
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