HoneyBerry
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Re: Apple variety question

I don't know. There probably are restrictions. I think that some of the Okanogan orchards that grow the organic heirlooms were old established orchards that were revived. I don't know very much. Just little bits of information that I gather along the way because I am very drawn to the old ways of agriculture.
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JONA
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Re: Apple variety question

Speaking of heirloom varieties. Do you have help from any official body in seeking out and planting up orchards of these old varieties in the States?
Over here for quite a few years now, there has been government and community funding in setting up local community orchards for the general public to enjoy these old vars before they become extinct.
Many schools have set their own little plots to show the kids what the old flavours where really like.
It's also helps save the varieties that are local to the area so that the genes are not lost for future generations. Great idea!
John

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Re: Apple variety question

nothing official i think. where it's done here it's done by inspired enthusiasts like lee calhoun, who's got an orchard of some 300-odd heirloom southern varieties. I'm sure there are at least a couple others like him around the country. not many, though, and all getting older.

HoneyBerry
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Re: Apple variety question

"Over here . . . there has been government and community funding in setting up local community orchards for the general public to enjoy these old vars before they become extinct. Many schools have set their own little plots to show the kids what the old flavours where really like."

That is a great idea, but I don't know of anything like what you describe. There are just some people who appreciate and want the old ways of farming. It is a small percentage. I am one of those people. There are so many people who seem like they don't care. But what is really going on is that they are uninformed and too busy for politics.
I live in a volcanic river valley that has excellent dirt for farming. The farms are slowly being taking over by developers. Apartment complexes and housing developments are taking over this nice farm land. There are still some farms left. But eventually the developers make them a monetary offer that they can't refuse. It doesn't make sense to waste farm land like this. But that is what's happening. And the forested hillsides are being stripped of trees in favor of housing development as well.
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JONA
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Re: Apple variety question

BirdLover wrote:"Over here . . . there has been government and community funding in setting up local community orchards for the general public to enjoy these old vars before they become extinct. Many schools have set their own little plots to show the kids what the old flavours where really like."

That is a great idea, but I don't know of anything like what you describe. There are just some people who appreciate and want the old ways of farming. It is a small percentage. I am one of those people. There are so many people who seem like they don't care. But what is really going on is that they are uninformed and too busy for politics.
I live in a volcanic river valley that has excellent dirt for farming. The farms are slowly being taking over by developers. Apartment complexes and housing developments are taking over this nice farm land. There are still some farms left. But eventually the developers make them a monetary offer that they can't refuse. It doesn't make sense to waste farm land like this. But that is what's happening. And the forested hillsides are being stripped of trees in favor of housing development as well.
Afraid that that's something that seems to be the so called modern approach
Birdlover.
Over here we get developments put on prime farming land while areas where the soil is much poorer gets ignored, mainly because of the lack of understanding of the planners involved.
John

BardSkye
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Re: Apple variety question

I'm afraid that seems to be the way up here in the north as well. And even the most dedicated who refuse any price end up having their land annexed.

However, since I don't have any answers to the world's problems, I'll just say thank you to both of you for the conversation.

ButterflyLady29
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Re: Apple variety question

Could it possibly be a Rhode Island Greening apple?
The description says it's rather tart and if eaten raw it needs to be salted to cut the tart flavor.
https://www.orangepippin.com/apples/rhod ... d-greening

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Re: Apple variety question

I think you may have nailed it. The description and pictures certainly fit best, as does the comment that it is mostly used for commercial baking (which would explain why I can never find one). Many thanks. I'll see if I can find an orchard that will sell me some of their fruit to find out for sure.

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HoneyBerry
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Re: Apple variety question

Here are some pictures of some Okanogan heirloom apples that are currently on display at the local health food store near where I live in Washington. Recall that there was some discussion earlier in this post about these wonderful apples.
The varieties that are currently available are:
Arkansas Black Heirloom from the 1800's.
Newton Pippen from the 17th century.
Winesap from the 1800's.
Macoon Heirloom Apple from the 1920's.
Sweet Louise (very pretty apple)
The Stayman Heirloom Apple from 1875.
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HoneyBerry
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Re: Apple variety question

I'm going to pick up some Staymans tomorrow. They are expensive. Last year the Okanogan apples were $2.99 per pound. This year they jumped up yo $3.49.
Sweet Louise is a very pretty apple. I might try some of those as well.
I gave out a few Arkansas Bkacks for Christmas gifts last year. The people that I gave them to didn't really appreciate them as special. They were no different than ordinary apples to them. I had to point out to them that they were special heirloom apples. I said to them "just look at the color. They are such a deep red. These are not typical apples." They did not seem to understand my enthusiasm. It was rather disappointing. I will never do that again.

The sign on the Stayman apples in one of the pictures says:
"The Stayman apple is descended from a winesap. It was discovered in Kansas 1875. The flesh is yellowish, firm, tender, juicy, and pleasantly sub-acid. This is a high quality apple which is excellent for cooking or juicing as well as fresh eating."
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BardSkye
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Re: Apple variety question

I'm very jealous of you right now, Birdlover. Though I have to admit, I'm no expert on apples; they're not my favourite fruit.

I would like to try some of the heirlooms (and will see what I can find on my side of the border), because I suspect part of my disinterest in apples is that the big stores' produce doesn't have much distinction between the varietal tastes. An apple is an apple is an apple, with nothing much to tell them apart. And even in the "farmer's markets," most of the fruit comes from the big commercial outfits, simply because we don't have much in the way of fruit trees.

ButterflyLady29
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Re: Apple variety question

BirdLover, I'm sorry your Arkansas Blacks were not appreciated. I got 2 off my little tree last year and they were wonderful, especially compared to those bland icky apples you get at the store. And they are so pretty, almost too pretty to eat.

HoneyBerry
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Re: Apple variety question

I just need to be careful about what kinds of gifts I give to people.
I was raised on processed food. When I discovered organic vegetables & fruits, a whole new world opened up for me. I've been excited ever since. It was as if I had finally discovered real food. I have to accept that not everyone is excited as I am.
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ButterflyLady29
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Re: Apple variety question

I was raised just the opposite, we grew most of our own food and processed food was an extreme rarity. My grandma even made home made pudding and ice cream. Unfortunately it has spoiled a lot of foods for me. There is no comparison to home grown peaches or strawberries. I've never bought a tomato from a grocery store, I've eaten them before and cannot stand to waste that kind of money on poor tomato substitutes.



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