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rainbowgardener
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well yes and no. My soil (where I have any) is hard clay and rock. I would have to work very hard at amending it to make it as conducive to plants as the nice loose enriched topsoil in my raised beds and to make it drain. It does make a difference to the plants.
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gixxerific
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rainbowgardener wrote:well yes and no. My soil (where I have any) is hard clay and rock. I would have to work very hard at amending it to make it as conducive to plants as the nice loose enriched topsoil in my raised beds and to make it drain. It does make a difference to the plants.
If I may RBG :hide:

I have, as I said, regular beds. They are theoretically not raised beds due to them not having official sides. But than again they are in theory raised beds due to all the hard work I have done amending them. I have added so much manure and compost to them they are really getting to be quite impressive. You can tell exactly where my additions have come in from year to year. The first year section is something you would be amazed with I know I am. The ground I started with and what I have now is so far from the original. There is no need for tilling you can just dig your hand in and you are good to go.

As you said though this is a work in progress but this could be a great year and if not this one soon my garden will be as great as my last garden.

So my question just what exactly is a raised bed. You can see my soil level is raised it is being held in somewhat by my fencing. So essentially I have a raised bed but with mine comes the problem of compaction since I don't have separate beds that I can walk around and not on. So mine is not perfect but it will grow if I can keep the bugs and disease out of it this year.

Just thinking aloud here. :wink:

DoubleDogFarm
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Like I have said in another forum, we may need to work on definitions.

Raised beds: Improved soil higher than the native soil.

Boxed beds. Raised beds encased in wood filled with improved soil.

Something like this. :D

Eric

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rainbowgardener
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Or I would say

raised rows - Augmenting the native soil by adding on to it, rather than tilling stuff in, often by putting the topsoil from the paths between onto the rows as well as soil amendments. Not boxed, may only be a little deeper than native soil, rows can be as long as the amount of room you have, though usually still no more than 3-4' wide for reaching in to, sometimes narrower than that.

raised beds - Framed /boxed in beds. Can be as deep as you want/ need them to be, usually 3-4' wide and anywhere from 4 -10' long (construction and materials tending to limit the length). Framed in wood, concrete, brick, or whatever durable material is handy.

I think most of the benefits that have been noted for raised beds apply to raised rows. If I had more land to garden that's what I would do.
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If those are the new choices then I am an in-ground, raised-row kinda guy! The other way is nice and all, but I get more surface area and less cost my way...

HG
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Yep, I'm with you HG.

First, You don't have to worry about the wood rotting, harboring bugs and or wood treatments. Even treated lumber rots eventually.

Second, Raised rows are usually slightly domed. So a 3ft wide raised row, probably has about 4ft of plantably surface.

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soil
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i hate raised beds but whats wrong with decomposing wood? i can see decomposing treated wood as a bad thing but regular wood as a benefit.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

DoubleDogFarm
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but regular wood as a benefit
IMO a very expensive slow release soil amendment, don't you think. :lol:

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soil
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IMO a very expensive slow release soil amendment, don't you think. Laughing

Eric
a slow release, water and nutrient retaining, fungi feeding material. i see that as a benefit.
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DoubleDogFarm
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Ok


Eric

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Rotting wood requires N to feed the process. Competes with plants to the point of lock-up if there is too much wood...

A little wood, s'allright... too much...?

HG
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and Ok again.

Eric

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Tilde
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quiltbea wrote:You can plant tomatoes, even the indeterminate that continue to grow, in a one-sqaure-foot spacing in a raised bed if you stake it or use strings to twist the tomato up its length.

Spacing:
1 plant per square foot
broccoli, brussels sprout, cabbage, cauliflower, eggplant, head lettuce, tomato, peppers,

4 per square foot:
leaf lettuce, parsley, Swiss chard, turnip,

9 per sq foot:
bush beans, spinach

16 per sq foot:
beets, carrots, radishes, leeks, onions,

If you trellis along the north side of your boxes:
cukes are 4 per sq foot,
melons are 4 per sq foot,
peas and pole beans are 8 per sq ft in two rows side by side planted 3" apart.
summer squash 3 in a space 4 ft long by 1 ft wide.

zucchini which does not vine takes 9 sq ft (3 across and 3 wide)
A very succint summation. Thank you.

OT: I used to have boxed beds (the neighbors' trees loved it, I've pulled up lots of volunteer trees and shared them with friends/family) and now I'm sqft in sqft containers.
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Vorguen
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I was thinking of making raised beds with no bottom so that the roots of the plants could go through the soil and continue into the earth as far as they need to


:D

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As you should.

Raising the bed helps to eliminate some restrictions to plant growth but nothing works like native soils, even if they are lean or clay or whatever. Biology will migrate both directions...

HG
Scott Reil

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Vorguen
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Well I was thinking, if I have raised beds with a lot of compost wouldn't that eventually spread below the raised bed and give nutrients to the rest of the backyard? One reason I might do raised beds is to remember what I plant where, so that I can make sure to do my best attempt at crop rotation :)


^ will need to research that a bit better first though

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