DoubleDogFarm
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I just set them loose in the woods. I know I may sound heartless but seriously - people can make me nuts when they have pets or livestock and do not act responsibly.
Now I'm ready.:evil: How is trapping and relocating a domestic animal responsible. Giving the problem to someone else.

Pets, Maybe. I believe it to be more humane to kill quickly and eat than to abandon to nature that is cruel. Please don't have animals if you can't give them a good life, be it short at times, and end it responsibly.

Eric
Last edited by DoubleDogFarm on Sat Dec 29, 2012 8:36 am, edited 1 time in total.

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ElizabethB
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They were not my birds. My irresponsible neighbor was raising fighting chickens. Turning them loose would not cause them injury - they are real beast. These birds are raised and trained to kill each other. Gross. I could have wrung their necks and tossed them. I thought setting them loose in the woods (not a neighborhood but out in the country) would at least give the beast a chance to survive. That was years ago. Glad I no longer have those issues.
Elizabeth - or Your Majesty

Living and growing in Lafayette, La.

When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant. ~Author Unknown

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jal_ut
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Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

Pests

I got a couple of heart traps from animal control for a refundable deposit. Baited them with corn - set them on my property. I caught 12 chickens in 5 days. I brought them out to the country where there were woods and fields and set them loose.
I am all for getting rid of pests, however, I have never agreed with re-locating the critters, no matter what they are. You are just giving someone else the problem. NO THANK YOU!

The Hav-a-Hart traps are good to catch critters with, however once you have the critter in the trap, you should drop the trap in the pond for a while, then later remove the critter and either bury it or send it with garbage collections.

You have some options. You can chase the critters off every time you see them. Takes full time vigilance to do this. You can trap them either with foot traps or Hav-a-Hart traps, or shoot them. A nice break barrel pellet gun works wonders on things up to cat and chicken size. Legal in most areas.

For sure chickens are edible. As noted, if it is an older bird, just cook it slowly until tender. It will make excellent soup.

I am sorry, I don't have much patience for stray critters in my garden. I once took out 5 peacocks in one spree with a 12 gauge shotgun. I am sure the neighbors all heard the noise, but nothing was ever said. You think a few chickens can mess up a garden, you should see what 5 peacocks can do.

Owners of cattle or horses will take responsibility to keep them in, but for some reason owners of birds don't seem to take it very seriously. I would never shoot someone's cow, but once they have been notified about birds, I will deal with them if they continue to be a problem.

I grew up on a ranch in Northern Utah and we had all sorts of wild critters bothering livestock at times and raiding our gardens.. Not to mention stray dogs harassing livestock. If we were to protect our livestock, it took firm measures. A loaded gun was always close to hand.

I am sorry if this seems harsh, but sometimes that is what it takes to protect our stock and crops.

For you in city lot situations, it may be better to use the Hav-a-Hart traps. These are effective.

Foot traps work well too, but are bad for pets if they get in them. I use foot traps by my beehives for skunks. No bait. Pets stay away from the bees, but the stupid skunks like to eat the bees. I tie the trap to a ten foot pole and once I have a skunk, I lead it over to the canal and drown it. No stink doing this. They won't spray as you lead them away and the water carries off what ever they release as they die.

Good luck!
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

DoubleDogFarm
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Well said James. :wink:

Eric

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ElizabethB
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Point taken - should have just wrung their necks. Many years ago. Thought I was doing good. Hope I never have a problem with fighting chickens again. It really was funny watching 2 grown men from animal control falling all over themselves trying to catch those birds with nets. NOT!

A funny story to share with you. Armadillos are a huge problem for gardeners in my area. They can tear up a lawn or garden over night and are almost impossible to trap.

I have to tell you about my friend Susan. She was a real southern girl - always dressed, made up, manicured and coifed. Southern Georgia accent in south Louisiana. A very dear friend but a real air head. She and her husband were wealthy and had a beautiful home on the Vermillion River in an exclusive subdivision. She had 4 acres of prime land on the river all beautifully landscaped. I was on the phone with her one time and she say "Shut my mouth - there is a d**** armadillo in my yard. I have to get my gun" Now Susan lives in the city limits and we are not allowed to dischage firearms. When I pointed that out to Susan she said "That's Ok Honey - I have "quiet" bullets and I WILL kill that s**." This in a voice dripping with honey with a little fire behind it. Miss that woman. She was a good shot and killed the sucker. I laughed until I cried. When she was done she got back on the phone and in that same honey voice said " I took care of that b******. Now where were we?"
Elizabeth - or Your Majesty

Living and growing in Lafayette, La.

When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant. ~Author Unknown

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jal_ut
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" I took care of that b******. Now where were we?"
I love it!
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

DoubleDogFarm
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:shock: LMFAO

Now where's that key. Image

Eric

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