sumadinac1
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How to transplant chilli sprouts minimising trauma

Hey there I recently had a strain of Chillis sprout quite well, however here in Melbourne we are heading into winter and I doubt that they will grow enough to weather winter. Secondly they have sprouted I a very tight cluster. As such my question is in two parts how can I go about transplanting the sprouted seed without affecting the growth/trauma too much? Secondly is there anyway that I can get them to grow inside through winter?

I have attached a picture, hope someone can help.
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rainbowgardener
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Re: How to transplant chilli sprouts minimising trauma

http://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/vi ... or+peppers

http://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/vi ... re#p314214

You can grow peppers indoors. The threads above are about bringing in peppers that have been growing outside first.

You can grow your seedlings indoors also - BUT they will need a lot of additional light, a window will not do. And they are not likely to do as well as grown outside, mostly just survive, unless you are really good at it.

As far as separating them, I'd just get a trowel and lift the whole clump up from underneath. Put the clump into a bucket of water and they will separate very easily as the soil dissolves away from them.
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applestar
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Re: How to transplant chilli sprouts minimising trauma

I'm going to give you one more link :wink:
:arrow: http://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/vi ... 48&t=60588

...I'm not saying to start the pepper seeds as shown in the link -- I'm experimenting with the technique for the first time this year, and there has been some growing pains. But as you can see, pepper seedlings can be delicately transplanted when their roots are at minimum like this.

So I suspect it will be easiest if you just insert a knife deep along one side, lift up and float the clump in a bowl of water to wash off the soil mix. Then you will be able to see the individual tap roots along with what should be minimal side shoots. I'm picking them up by snagging with a bamboo skewer. Poke a deep hole in the soilmix with a skewer or a chopstick or a pencil, gently guide the root in with the skewer and dribble some water in. I'm using a pipette but you can squirt with a water sprayer or water gun.
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