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CharlieK
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An Iris to identify

I think this is an Iris, the rhizome type. Can you guys give me a more accurate identification?

https://www.pbase.com/toosnvetts/image/95688260

Thanks!

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imagardener2
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It looks like a species LA iris, [url=https://www.badbear.com/signa/signa.pl?Iris-brevicaulis]Iris brevicaulis[/url], to me.

[url=https://home-and-garden.webshots.com/photo/2341434880103461537AxAlhP][img]https://thumb17.webshots.net/t/69/469/4/34/88/2341434880103461537AxAlhP_th.jpg[/img][/url]

This a bloom from my garden in March of this year. The parent plant came from the swamps between Johnson's Bayou and Port Arthur just a few months before Rita tore through and devastated the area.

Edited to change Port Isabel to Port Arthur
Last edited by imagardener2 on Tue May 20, 2008 4:07 pm, edited 2 times in total.
"Our elders instruct us to always walk upon Mother Earth with respect, gentleness, and with thankful hearts. We must never deviate from the fundamental precept of stewardship, or we will be capable of causing great harm."

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CharlieK
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Yes, that looks very similar and mine was in a swampy ditch near my house so I think it is the same flower or very close. Did you lose your home to Rita. The area where I am is still recovering from Katrina after almost three years! I have a good friend from Creole and his house was moved 1/2 mile into the swamp. He displaced to Kinder.
I value my garden more for being full of blackbirds than of cherries, and very frankly give them fruit for their songs. Addison

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imagardener2
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Having lived on the Texas coast most of my life I understand hurricane devastation. My heart goes out to y'all!

I think one of the things that makes my iris look different from yours is the petals on mine are far more arched (I know there's a proper term for that, but it eludes me at the moment) and thus the point at the end of the petal isn't seen in my photo.

I happened on 'my' iris while on my way home [url=https://geocities.com/d_m_g_s/Truck.jpg]from a job[/url] to Cameron. The iris were in full bloom as we drove the coast road between Cameron and Port Arthur. My husband was so sweet to walk out to the water's edge, ever mindful of gators, and pull up a large plant w/ rhizome for me. I brought it home and planted it in my tiny water garden where it has been happily growing and multiplying ever since.

This beauty was in a drainage ditch just north of the Pizza Inn in Venice.

[url=https://home-and-garden.webshots.com/photo/2731928150103461537kBQecI][img]https://thumb17.webshots.net/t/52/652/9/28/15/2731928150103461537kBQecI_th.jpg[/img][/url]

Both of these plants brought and continue to bring home to me the devastation of Rita and Katrina each time I look at them I'm reminded that what was once their home is now so completely different.

BTW In [url=https://www.pbase.com/toosnvetts/image/83404316]your picture of the vaults/crypts[/url] I was reminded of the time I parked my truck in the Venture yard in Venice and caught some much needed sleep. Not 15' from me was a collections of vaults. When Katrina went through those vaults were one of the first things I thought of.
"Our elders instruct us to always walk upon Mother Earth with respect, gentleness, and with thankful hearts. We must never deviate from the fundamental precept of stewardship, or we will be capable of causing great harm."

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CharlieK
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OMG! I have spider lilies in one of our gardens. Had no idea what they are. Yes, we have traveled the same roads and appreciated the same things. How amazing is that?

https://www.pbase.com/toosnvetts/image/88010858
I value my garden more for being full of blackbirds than of cherries, and very frankly give them fruit for their songs. Addison

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imagardener2
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Love your photograph!

Small world, huh? [img]https://geocities.com/d_m_g_s/emoticons/happy.gif[/img]


I realized I wrote earlier Johnson's Bayou and Port Isabel; I should have written Johnson's Bayou and Port Arthur.[img]https://geocities.com/d_m_g_s/emoticons/errr.gif[/img]
"Our elders instruct us to always walk upon Mother Earth with respect, gentleness, and with thankful hearts. We must never deviate from the fundamental precept of stewardship, or we will be capable of causing great harm."

newsunrise
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wow :shock: those spider lilies are wonderful i have never seen anything like them. How delecate are they would they grow in a climate like mine? zone 3? I have day lilies that do very well and Iris do well here to.... i hope i can grow them here they are WOW!!

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imagardener2
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newsunrise wrote:How delecate are they would they grow in a climate like mine? zone 3? I have day lilies that do very well and Iris do well here to.... I hope I can grow them here they are WOW!!
Their genus is [url=https://www.shieldsgardens.com/amaryllids/Hymenocallis.html]Hymenocallis[/url] and I believe this species is [url=https://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=HYLI]liriosme[/url].

[url=https://www.technovelgy.com/ct/Science-Fiction-News.asp?NewsNum=428]Here's[/url] an interesting article about how the Hymenocallis is the foundation for the design of the [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burj_Dubai]Burj Dubai[/url] in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
"Our elders instruct us to always walk upon Mother Earth with respect, gentleness, and with thankful hearts. We must never deviate from the fundamental precept of stewardship, or we will be capable of causing great harm."

newsunrise
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thankyou for the info. it may be possible to grow them here the only thing that worries me is the 200 days of frost free temps. It would be close. I am going to look into them a little more there may be a species close to them that is a litttle more frost tollerent.
thanks again

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CharlieK
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Good luck, Newsunrise, they are quite beautiful!

Imagardener2, you are a walking encyclopedia! I enjoy your posts but I will not let you rest! What is this? Full Latin nomenclature please. :lol:

https://www.pbase.com/toosnvetts/image/88037761
I value my garden more for being full of blackbirds than of cherries, and very frankly give them fruit for their songs. Addison

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imagardener2
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CharlieK wrote:Imagardener2, you are a walking encyclopedia!
Oh, how you flatter me, but I really only know what I read. [img]https://geocities.com/d_m_g_s/emoticons/antlers.gif[/img]

Your photo beautifully depicts a [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plumeria]Plumeria[/url] (Family: Apocynaceae Genus: Plumeria Species: I'm guessing rubra)

I have around 9 of these at various stages of growth in my backyard. They're somewhat easily grown from cuttings and once rooted they're very easily managed. Mine are all container grown above ground and go into my hoop house in the winter. A lady down the street from me grows hers in a container left in the ground until winter. A guy around the corner from me has his planted directly in the ground in his front yard and it's HUGE!

2 of mine came to me as rooted cuttings in a trade, the others were unrooted cuttings from Hawaii. I purchased quite a few more than what survived, but I rescued 2 heelers from the pound and they decimated a large number of my plants before I found them new homes. <sigh!> Due to the upheaval several of them took a couple of years to sprout.
"Our elders instruct us to always walk upon Mother Earth with respect, gentleness, and with thankful hearts. We must never deviate from the fundamental precept of stewardship, or we will be capable of causing great harm."

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imagardener2
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CharlieK, as I was adding Iris brevicaulis to a plant database today I realized I have made a mistake in IDing my plant! As i was looking for info on the height of the plant I saw that i. brevicaulis is the shorter plant and [url=https://facstaff.hsc.unt.edu/rbarton/Iris/hexas/I_gigant.htmlIris_giganticaerulea]i. giganticaerulea[/url] is the tallest variety.... :oops: ([url=https://www.zydecoirises.com/Species/Giganticaerulea/Giganticaerulea.htm]Here[/url]'s a great picture of i. giganticaerulea in their natural habitat.)

The variety difference might explain why the petals are [url=https://www.dictionary.net/recurved]recurved[/url] differently in my picture than in yours.


The Bible says, "you, then, who teach others, do you not teach yourself?". Oh, how very true!!
"Our elders instruct us to always walk upon Mother Earth with respect, gentleness, and with thankful hearts. We must never deviate from the fundamental precept of stewardship, or we will be capable of causing great harm."

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CharlieK
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Thanks, Imagardener2! My plant was tall, probably about three feet.

Yep, I guess the day you finish learning, you're dead! :D
I value my garden more for being full of blackbirds than of cherries, and very frankly give them fruit for their songs. Addison

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