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nes
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Wildflower to ID

I love wildflower gardens and tossed a few mixed packages into my new beds. There are a few particularly lovely flowers and I was wondering if anyone knew what they were :) (I know, I need to do a little weeding :D).

[img]https://i654.photobucket.com/albums/uu269/knitness/DSC00568.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i654.photobucket.com/albums/uu269/knitness/DSC00569.jpg[/img]

The orange flowers are scarlet runner beans, but I'm not sure about the purple ones.

[img]https://i654.photobucket.com/albums/uu269/knitness/DSC00570.jpg[/img]

TX
Vanessa raising organic vegetables, livestock, wildflowers, and family in zone 5A.

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applestar
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I recognize the first two from a wildflower seed catalog but I don't remember off hand what they are. If no one else has answered by morning, I'll look them up. The third one is -- are you ready? -- Deadly Nightshade or Belladonna (Atropa belladonna). Contains Atropine, among others. Here's the Wiki entry: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atropa_belladonna

If it's in a vegetable garden, you should probably get rid of it to prevent any accidental harvesting. I have one growing among my front doorstep foundation plantings, and I was going to pull it out, but it has such dainty flowers, you know? Then just yesterday morning, I was outside enjoying the cool morning air at 5:45AM, and was treated to a pair of hummingbirds in a mid-air territorial dispute. After one male successfully drove off the other, he proceeded to sip from the Belladonna flowers. So if you've planted the Scarlet Runner Beans for the hummers, you might want to keep the Belladonna for them too. Later on, the birds enjoy the black berries -- which is how yours (and mine) ended up growing where they are in the first place.

cynthia_h
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The small blue wildflower looks like flax (Linum) to me.

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

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applestar
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OK, the 2nd one is called Five Spot "Nemophila maculata" native to California... and the 1st one is probably Baby Blue Eyes "Nemophila insignis" also native to California. The flower color is darker/streaked with darker colors in the catalog but is described as "sky blue flowers" (I *almost* had this one -- kept thinking "Blue Eyed Grass" which it isn't and which is what *I* have... couldn't remember its real name). The 2nd one, I kept thinking "TEXAS Five Spot" which it obviously isn't, and when I counted the spots in your photo, it seemed like there were more than 5? Too bleary eyed, maybe?
:lol: -- Ha! I must've been thinking of the dance "Texas Two-Step" last night :lol:

Cynthia, flax has similar flowers, but is much taller, and -- sorry nes :wink: -- I think the weeds surrounding it is confounding the foliage ID. If you magnify the photo as much as you can, you'll see that this one has sort of yarrow-like leaves, not short grassy/spikey alternating leaves.

Don't worry nes, my garden isn't much better. Though I must say, I'm dying to reach in the screen and pull out the Galinsoga (the weed with tiny daisy-like flowers), my perpetual nemesis. :lol:

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nes
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Thanks for the kick in the pants guys :). The garden was WAY overdue for a weeding (too much attention to the veggies). Here are some better photos:

[img]https://i654.photobucket.com/albums/uu269/knitness/DSC00598.jpg[/img]

There are 5 spots :) Native to California? I hope not! I was really hoping these guys would come back next year, but they're not going to take our winter in that case.

[img]https://i654.photobucket.com/albums/uu269/knitness/DSC00594.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i654.photobucket.com/albums/uu269/knitness/DSC00596.jpg[/img]

It's quite possible that is nightshade, I believe I threw a hummingbird mix into this garden (although we're surrounded by pasture and I've only ever seen 1 humming bird but I keep trying!!). If it is nightshade, is it/how invasive is it? I'm not too worried about my dogs or cats eating it but I do know it's a BIG problem for grazers and we do back onto a cow field (but it's probably 40' from this garden).

Sorry I can't zoom in any more, the digi I'm using is no good! :|
Vanessa raising organic vegetables, livestock, wildflowers, and family in zone 5A.

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applestar
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Much better. Pat, pat. :wink:
Nes, make sure you water well after weeding - hopefully, you've already done that. You've disturbed the roots and taken away some surrounding soil, PLUS the weeds were shading the soil surface before. I've killed many desirable plants by ruthlessly weeding around it, then forgetting to water afterwards. What I usually do now is weed, water, then mulch with just the tops of the weeds -- either I tore off the tops first when weeding or I'll pull off some more, or, I happen to have pruners handy and cut the roots off, or, more often than not, I have long grass growing along the edges and I'll pull those off. 8)

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Kisal
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The plant with the little purple flowers is deadly nightshade. In my area, it's very invasive. It might not be so bad in an area with cold winters, though. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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nes
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Applestar's ID were correct except the five-spots are actually littlefoot/meadow (Nemophila penduculata) they have striped too. I'm disappointed the baby blue-eye are from California, I may have to hatch some plan to dig them out and bring them in for the winter... hmmm... However the littlefoot is from all over NA so if I'm lucky maybe it will seed and come back :).

On further reflection, I'm pulling out the nightshade - it's too bad because it so darn pretty! But I don't want the little man to eat it :(.
Last edited by nes on Sun Jul 12, 2009 1:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
Vanessa raising organic vegetables, livestock, wildflowers, and family in zone 5A.

cynthia_h
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nes wrote:All applestar's ID were correct - I'm disappointed the Nemophila are from California, I may have to hatch some plan to dig them out and bring them in for the winter... hmmm...
There are many, many climate zones in California, from Sunset climate zone 1A (same as Laramie, Wyoming, and other Intermountain West areas) in the northeast section of the state near Oregon & Nevada, down to the very hot hot hot desert near Arizona and Mexico, classified as Sunset climate zone 13. The coastal areas are different yet again.

So don't give up on the flower quite yet; it could be native to any number of conditions! Let it flower and reseed; if it survives outdoors, great! :D

Cynthia

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