Chad-K
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Location: Wild and Wonderful West Virginia

primrose!

I bought an almost dead primrose for a discounted price 2 summers ago, but I couldnt bring it back to good health, so I planted it in the garden because I just couldnt throw it away.

Last winter, in February, it bloomed! There was even snow on the ground and it still lived and bloomed beautifully!

I was wondering if anyone had any information about primroses. I was at the grocery store today and they have some for sale, but the tag says they are annuals, but mine is the same thing but it is still alive and the leaves are lush and green this winter also. Im curious to see if it will bloom this winter again.

I'll see if I can find a picture of it and upload it.

Chad-K
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[img]https://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid199/pd56ba11bd776c1a879a167dc7acb7bf6/f0958a44.jpg[/img]

[img]https://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid199/p62a519838ae81c151ed916baa5ff330a/f0958aa1.jpg[/img]

[img]https://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid199/p1221fc0f4ffe222feca294d40262324f/f09589e7.jpg[/img]

Chad-K
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[img]https://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid166/p5f1ac289a9cdb73f78e4540cfc010a23/f44bef94.jpg[/img]

[img]https://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid166/p4287e5ce822751a53ed1e898911a09f8/f44befa5.jpg[/img]

opabinia51
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Not a primrose expert myself but, plants like good soil so, feed the soil and the soil will take care of your plant.

With regard to whether the primrose is an annual or a perennial: plants can be either depending on what climate they are grown in. And some plants are annuals (or perenials) no matter what climate they are grown in. So, if you can grow a primrose as a perennial, power to you!

The Helpful Gardener
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Primula is a big genus and mostly perennial. They are great for shade and come early, often through snow. I like the later blooming Japanese types, but there are many fascinating cultivars and species...

HG

grandpasrose
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Chad, all the primulas that I have in my garden have been grocery store primroses that someone got in an arrangement, and didn't know what to do with it when the arrangment was outgrown. I've just brought them home, plunked in the garden, and they do fine. I have had to divide some of them several times, and they are one of the first things to bloom (aside from the bulbs) in the spring. :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

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Look for the new hose-in-hose primulas called 'You and Me' All the usual colors and a doubled flower! Neat! :D

HG
Last edited by The Helpful Gardener on Wed Feb 08, 2006 3:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Grey
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Wow - I need to get me some of those!

Wonder, with the colors, how they would look in a bed across from a bed of periwinkle? Looks like it would mix well with hostas and some Daffodils...

(can you tell I am in planning mode?)

The Helpful Gardener
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They would play nicely with the other kids listed...

Ferns and darker greens look good with that bright green foliage, and I am getting more and more enamored of shade grasses like the Carexes and Hakonechloa (there's an all gold out now), and don't get me started on hostas...

Chad-K
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Thanks for the heads up HG for the new primroses! :o

The Helpful Gardener
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Their nice, just loaded a bunch on a truck for Ohio; I join them tomorrow for the show (taking the red-eye). Won't see you all for a bit...

Scott
Last edited by The Helpful Gardener on Wed Feb 08, 2006 4:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Chad-K
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Alright, I just bought some primroses at a discount price. They started looking almost dead. But, they are just like the ones that I saved a couple of years back.

My question is: They are in small pots. Should I re-pot them to a bigger pot to give their roots more room and keep them inside and see if they come back to life a little and maybe even bloom again? Or, should I simply stick them in the garden and wait for next year to see if they make it?

Also, should I fertilize the primrose that is in my garden? It looks very small and hasnt grown much?

I don't know much about growing primroses (primula).

Thanks in advanced!

grandpasrose
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Hi Chad! I'm not sure what your temperatures are there right now. If it is fairly warm, I would plant them right outside, the less moving back and forth the better. When you plant them, be sure to include some well rotted manure, compost, mulched leaves, bone meal, to give them a good start. If it is still pretty cold, then your next option is to try to save them indoors. They are probably rootbound, and greenhouse forced to bloom for the store shelves.
For your little one outside, for one, it is early in the year yet, and they look tiny when they first start out.
But you could also add some well rotted manure, compost etc. around it. You could also try watering it with some compost tea.
Best of luck with your little patients. I hope they get well soon! :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

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Chad, wasn't that snow on the ground in that first pic? Give a flower a chance! :lol: :wink:

As for fertilization of existing plants and planting the other primroses, make sure they have room to spread out. They hate root competition, especially from lawn grass (a voracious nitrogen pig). Mulch them in with good compost (that doubles as your fertilizer as well; did my veggie garden with nothing but last year and had my best year ever. AND built some really amazing soil as well :D ); this helps to keep down weeds and preserve moisture. Sure it's more work to make compost, but it cuts down on work later...(You can always buy it, if you are so inclined... :wink: )

HG

Chad-K
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The primroses I tried to save are having a bit of a problem. I have them in the house in a well lit area in a cool place and their leaves are now very soft and drooping. I sure hope they don't die.

grandpasrose
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Chad, make sure the soil isn't sitting moist. That might be part of the problem. They don't like to sit in soggy soil. Also, just because the existing leaves are wilting, does not mean it is necessarily dead. There might be new leaves coming very soon! You could try watering with a little compost tea. Remember, these were forced to grow and bloom, so this has been a shock to them. Think of them as little patients, and their mending on the inside! :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

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I'd agree with that. I am a fan of Japanese primrose because they do well in moister soils, but yours wants well drained leaf duff and humus; think woodland plant...

HG

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