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applestar
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Planted Blauwschokker Blue peas and Kakai squash in SGAX
Image -- pre-starting does provide instant gratification Image
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

I picked up Detroit Dark Red and Avalanche beet seeds at Agway. Soaked overnight and sowed some in a mounded row with extra fertilizer added.

Earliest of the radishes are starting to come in, but some of them are starting to bolt also (and then there seems to be some very late ones that haven't shown any sign of bulging.... I wonder if I should fertilize some more). I think there was a day or two when I should have watered instead of hoping for rain. Now that we did have rain, baby slugs are all over them. :x

VGA -- under the insect screen, Found a big slug and a couple of little ones that were wreaking havoc :evil:

Image
5/23 ETA -- loose leaf Chinese cabbage Osaka Shirona in the middle right and heading type Kyoto No.3 in the front, with Tatsoi in between and Komatsuna (another loose leaf) in the front to the left with left-behind volunteer garlic and 2nd yr Lunar carrots and parsley that I'm hoping to get seeds from. Broccoli in the back. IcebergA lettuce along the right ... Etc. etc. Image
...caught another giant slug trying to get away in here this morning Image


Today's harvest Image

TOP LEFT salad fixin's -- lettuce (thinned and cut-and-come IcebergA, Bibb, volunteer red, Mascara), Garden Cress, arugula, earliest radishes (bunny tail, Swiss melange), baby red Russian kale. yellow kale flowers and buds, violet flowers and baby leaves, plantain baby leaves, broccoli side shoots, magenta spreen/Spinach Tree (basically lambs quarters with magenta colored new leaves), red orach.
TOP RIGHT: stir fry greens -- loose leaf Chinese cabbage Osaka Shirona, Tatsoi, kale flower shoots, purple passion asparagus, radish tops, bolting celery and carrot tops.
Image
BOTTOM LEFT (aromatic herbs) my fuzzy spearmint (I have another patch with same shape leaves but no fuzz), peppermint, chervil, parsley, lemon balm,
BOTTOM-RIGHT -- strawberries :D
Last edited by applestar on Mon May 23, 2016 7:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Added description of VGA vegs.
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

I like all the color in the top left bowl applestar, what all do you have in there?
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applestar
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Salad fixin's -- had them with my dinner topped with sliced kiwi, kalamata olives, couple of blobs of hummus, EVOO,
Edited the above post with caption for the harvest collage. :wink:
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Beautiful GGS (good green stuff) Applestar! I have great luck capturing slugs using little yogurt cups (the wide-mouth kind) with beer-bait. They slide in and drown. I scoop out a little hole, so the rim is at soil level, empty and replenish every day or so.

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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Thanks! I found a few more big' uns between garlic stems and leaves yesterday, and two of the runner beans have lacework leaves. I did put down some DE but am planning to go at them using several different methods. :twisted:

Right now my main concern is protecting the blushing Sea Scape strawberries from birds. This morning, I saw a catbird in the Spiral Garden. With robins, they could be looking for worms or nesting material, but catbirds will start visiting about a week to a few days before the berries start ripen in earnest :x

I've had my share of frustration to the point of nearly bursting into tears over the typical black plastic bird netting that tangle up easily in larger sizes. So this year, I opted for nylon woven fishnet type. I'm not one to measure, but I lucked out and this one turned out pretty much perfect for the Inner Spiral, and my makeshift hoops seem to be adequate for the job with the wire compost bin holding up the middle.

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I was a bit sorry because I saw a house wren hunting around by the compost bin earlier. I will have to keep an eye on the situation in case any bird gets caught up in the netting. I also still have to secure the netting -- just draped over for now -- earth staple the edges down, and I also bought a wire pet cage crimping doo-dad as well as net hooks. Just have to do it when not so mind-wiped from solid morning spent on planting gotta plant them NOW pre-germinated seeds. :roll: ( do you see the little cardboard tent I had to set up for an inadequately hardened off seedling? I hope that will be sufficient. :| )
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Updated my maps for these beds Image

Image

Image
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

So, yesterday, what I did was take those seedzipped sprouted cucurbits, and instead of planting them in little cups safely in the house, planted them directly in the garden. Of course it was a blazing hot, sunny day -- and these delicate seedlings were so tender that cotyledons of a squash in one zeedzip that I'd accidentally left where the sun moved around to shine on it lost the tips of its seedleaves from being burned in a matter of minutes. :eek:

I knew though, that I was taking a chance, and I watered them in as I planted so that the soil and the 1/2-1 cup of potting mix I put in each hole swirled around and covered the seedlings with fine particles (a little sunblock), and then I put a clump of the raked dry grass thatch I had used for mulching the strawberries over the seedlings so they would have a little shade and humidity.

Even so, I wasn't positive they would make it. But today, it looks like they have raised themselves up from being plastered onto the soil, and some of the more vigorous squash had push the grass up and aside.

Here's a panoramic collage I made of the Spiral Garden Annex where I planted Kakai squash to occupy and hopefully, thoroughly shade out the weeds at the ground level, and H-19 Littleleaf cucumbers to climb the short fence with the Blawschokker Blue peas.

You saw the map before, but I'll include for reference. I intend to plant Shitokiwa cucumber along the outer Spiral in the back, along the path on the other side of the trellis netting where the peas will grow first. Even though that will skirt the "Buffer Zone", there are shrubbery planted on both our side and their side of the fence along that particular stretch, so it's not too likely that anything they spray on their side will reach the cucumbers, and in any case, the fruits are more likely to push past the trellis to the sunnier Inner Spiral side to grow, and worst case, the cucumber leaves will also provide another layer of barricade to protect the Inner Spiral.

Image

The photo on the right is the border bed between VCD raised bed of radishes and VGC. I planted pre-germinated Pickarow pickling cucumbers here and Luffa on the north (closest in the photo) end. I'm hoping to create a shaded bed here for heat sensitive plants and possibly get an early start for the fall harvesting crops. You might be able to count four small clumps of dry grass shading the sprouted cucumber seedlings, and the one large clump of dry grass shading the Luffa seedlings. :()
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

VGB corn patch with Marrowfat peas and the insect mesh covered VGA.

If the Mirai350BC corn seedlings don't hurry up and surge ahead, they are going to get overwhelmed by the aggressive double tendriled Marrowfat Peas. Image


I found some cabbageworm damage on unprotected broccoli elsewhere, but these ones under the cover will hopefully stay safe. up to now, the Asian greens and the broccoli have been WAY shading out the corn. Even though VGA was planted first and the insect screen offered some protection and warmth from the cold temperatures, at this rate, the VGB seedlings will overtake the VGA and it will be the VGA that will be the later harvested corn (IF they make it to full size and maturity)

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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

FWIW -- the pallet sided raised bed on the fence end of the VGB -- behind me as I'm standing on the walkway•swale in between -- has been in use as yard waste compost pile, covered with a skylight window that I had picked up (it still has aeration from the open pallet slats on the sides). I watched the weeds, etc debris dry up and perhaps get solarlized, condensation on the double-glazed glass soaking back in, then wormsigns -- earthworm casting mounds -- at first dotting here and there, but by yesterday, the entire surface under the window consisted of solid castings... So I put down another layer -- mostly cover crop vetch pulled as they were starting to bloom, as well as some shrubby prunings. Covered with the window again. We will see.

Image
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

See that wasp on the bottom right edge of the window? Prolly looking for a nice fat cabbage worm! :twisted:
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Yep, they are really great -- they get inside the broccoli heads and cabbage leaves, inside corn leaves -- all the places that are hard for me to poke around.

...it's getting too hot here and I had to start harvesting some of the broccoli --

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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

We've been going through a summer-level heat wave. My Peas have only just started to bloom and just starting to set pods.

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It's going to be rainy/cloudy and in 70's, low 80's tomorrow, and then things are going to actually cool down with highs of 70's for a while. So hopefully they will hang in there and give us a full harvest.

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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

I saw you mentioned in another topic ( weeks ago???) that you make a banana peel tonic and do foliage sprays with that. Correct?

If so, have you noticed a decrease in aphids?

The reason I ask, is because I read SOMEWHERE, that leaving banana peels around the base of the plant helps to keep them away..... I don't think so.... But it did get me thinking about foliar banana tonic spray, and if it might have any uses for aphids.
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Nah, that was for the winter -- just for fun and variation in feeding the container plants in the Winter Indoor a Garden (and keeping the worms in the containers fed). It's easier to just toss the banana peel in the compost pile now. :P
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Update :mrgreen:

Espalier Fence Row, Haybale Row, Sunflower House and Extension, Raspberry Fence Row
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Corn and Peas, etc. in the Sunflower House
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Planted pre-germinated adzuki beans everywhere I could squeeze them in, including among the partly planted cherry tomatoes in the new Raspberry Fence Row Extension dubbed "2016 Cherry Lane", between Marrowfat and Swiss Giant peas in the SFH, alongside Chickpeas in the outer Spiral Garden.
Image

Overview of this area including the Spiral Garden Annex of Blauwschokker soup peas, H-19 Littleleaf cucumbers, and Kakai hulless seed squash
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

beautiful! It looks a little like a labyrinth. I hope my circle garden will eventually have that effect too -- it won't be a labyrinth, but it may remind you of one a bit.
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

The Spiral Garden is a lot of fun. It's great to watch the garden fill in as the season progresses with any size bed, but this one takes on a well-defined spiral ...then eventually turns into a mounded jungle, and depending on what is planted for the rotation, I literally have to push my way in between and under the canopy. ha.
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Didn't you say you are about to pull your peas, Rainbowgardener?

My first harvest just started with the Golden Sweet snowpeas:

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My two hanging basket of peas are bearing pods, too -- they will be ready soon. The extra tall one that's falling over is Green Arrow and is normally about 4 ft tall and need support. The other one is Sugar Daddy, I think.
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

VGA today --

Image

Kyoto No.3 heading Nappa in the front looks like it might be starting to form a head. There are three but only the one in the middle is progressing well -- guess I planted them too close :roll: You can see the corn trying to get through (not the volunteer garlic in the front left but the grassy looking leaves among the big leaves). I keep harvesting the loose leaf Osaka Shirona, thinning and cutting IcebergA lettuce that I'm not saving to head up, and the Komatsuna to give Mirai350bc corn the chance to keep growing while we wait for the *spring* greens to finish up. I'm harvesting the main heads from these broccoli, too. Successful succession in here is going to be touch-and-go. :> Insect screen is keeping them safe from the cabbage white butterflies that are starting to flit everywhere and dumping eggs under the leaves of unprotected broccoli and kale leaves. :x

OH YEAH -- I saw the baby praying mantis still in here. It had molted to a green instar maybe not quite 2 inches long. :-()
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Cabbage white butterfly kaleidoscope has arrived -- I imagin this would be the second or third generation since they start showing up in ones and twos in very early spring.

Now, they are everywhere, and I swear they are mocking me. They flit by when my hands are full. They flutter up from where I'm heading to do something else. I look out of the window and they cross my field of view. They are dumping eggs -- so many! Even on runty plants. I can only successfully catch them -- one at a time -- maybe 1 out of 4 tries with the butterfly net. And they ALWAYS not only appear but flutter near when I don't have the net.

I don't really like Bt but might to have to bite the bullet. I can live with using Bt if I do it very carefully and put only on the brassica. I can't use anything else that affects other insects because I'm seeing way too many beneficial insects everywhere -- hover flies, robber flies, tiny little beneficial wasps -- braconids, trichogrammas, aphid mummy makers -- praying mantis babies are scurrying everywhere and ladybug larvae and pupae. Paper wasps are looking for caterpillars already. I realized I can't use DE dust against slugs because ground spiders are everywhere on the mulch.

Hmm... And the birds will be gathering food to feed their babies too.

I'm half tempted to rely on the numerous Garden Patrol that are already here, but I know from past experience that they are not 100% effective, and won't help with keeping broccoli heads clean -- I may decide to just harvest the remaining broccoli at whatever stage they are in. Cabbage and kale generally fare better, and I only have to remove the worst affected leaves. I think I planted cauliflower too late -- they are still only in leaf stage.
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Today's harvest:
Image


Onion flower :D
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Image

All planted and growing, including the adzuki beans that just came up. ...time to mulch the paths Image
(And get more wood shavings for the beds)
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Image

...fern-like plants are Chickpeas and the heart-shaped seedleaves coming up in a neat lines are the adzuki that were planted after pre-germinating. The photo on the right shows a squash seedling that were planted directly after sprouting on spoon seedzip. (I'll mention the corn below)

I killed a couple (well, OK a few :oops: ) doing this -- we're talking super coddled seeds sprouted in seedzip under lights, then immediately taken outside and planted in full sun. :roll:

I'm getting better at it though -- here, we have Orangeglo watermelon that were planted. What, you can't see them? Of course not. :>

Image
-- it turns out this is the key. They spend the first day covered like this -- under a pot, even a 3oz cup that had been used for other seedlings that were actually planted in potting mix after germinating to sprout. I planted these today.

In the left photo, you can see a watermelon seedling in front of the pot. That one was planted two days ago, and spent yesterday and day before (which were partly cloudy) with a pop up insect screen food dome over it to give it the lightest of shades. Image
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

I'm finding volunteer corn here and there. It could be they are just bird- or chipmunk/squirrel- sown from some bird seeds, but they might be accidentally dropped seeds of the Bloody Butcher that were growing in the Spiral Garden before, so I'm letting some of them grow.
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Corn in the SFH are growing fast too. Don't get mislead by the elephant garlic in the SFHX, but the closer group of corn were planted 11 days after the farther group.

Image
- use right-click "Open Image" for full view -

...sorry looking tomatoes in the HBR are starting to look more presentable since they have started to recover from mite infestation. I'll post closeup pics soon...
...I keep forgetting to take pictures of the Iris versicolor in full bloom right now...
...the two Hari eggplants are still inside the wall-o-water Has anyone ever just left it in place? I imagine at some point, it will become impossible to remove....
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

View of SFH and HBR from the SFHX mostly Elephant Garlic Bed. If you zoom in -- use right click Open Image -- you might be able to see the House Wren peeking out :D

Image

...another view of the "stately" Elephant Garlic and the rest of the garlic in the Apple Guild bed starting to make scapes :D

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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

I wanted to share this photo. Marrowfat peas are oddities for sure. I have to rescue the corn from their double "handed" pairs of grasping tendril clutches at least every two days.

Image

(These are Kandy Korn x Glass Gem F1)
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Some of the eggplants --

Kamo in one of the HBR tomato slots ... 2 Hari's in wall-o-water at eastern/sunniest end of HBR
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VGB Pallet-sided High Raised Bed: Overwintered White Comet ... Hari

-- This bed tends to dry out but the soil at ground level below tends to stay wet and sometimes soggy due to low valley grading effect between our property and the neighbor's, plus the neighbor has an extended rain gutter downspout that drains outside of their foundation planting on this side. (She used to complain that the narrow patch of grass between her foundation planting and my fence got soggy and wet every time I watered my veg garden -- part of the reason I built the pallet-sided high raised beds was to dam and soak up the excess before going over the property line....) Sunflowers grow very well here, but I wanted to rotate something different this year.
-- I originally intended to plant gourds and I did get two luffa seedlings (started in cups to true leaf stage) planted, but when I tried to sow pre-germinated and pre-sprouted seeds, something (slugs or pill bugs/sow bugs) ate every single one of them. :evil: So I had to switch gears and find other crops that grow deep enough roots. Eggplants should work. I might plant some Okra since I intend for the Luffa to climb along the top of the fence. I have the seeds (Jing Orange, Burgundy, and Louisiana Velvet -pale green almost white) pre-germinating. This time, I'm going to put a bunch of DE -- both sand sized and powdered -- in there when I sow the seeds.
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

First small cutting of lavender. :D These are all from the new small/tiny plants -- the big plant is not quite ready yet.
Unfortunately, I couldn't take the photo outside because we had a crazy scary wind storm that ROARED through just as I was cutting these. LIghting is terrible in my laundry room. :roll:
image.jpeg
I rubber banded and hung the small bunch in our bedroom :()

...I didn't take a picture but I also snipped and grabbed some Southernwood before the rains started, so I will be able to dry and make some moth sachets. Probably get some tansy, too, next time the the weather is dry, before they start getting powdery mildew. I use the lavender stems for these. Flowers and buds are for special projects and for tea and cooking in baked goods, and putting in ice cream, etc.
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Sunflower House (SFH) and Sunflower Extension (SFHX)

Image
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Everything looks so beautiful! Wondering, how did you get rid of the mite infestation on the tomatoes? And hasn't the weather been just so so uncooperative? I've awakened to 40, even 39 degrees for a little over a week now, and I'm just tired of carrying my basil flats in and out of the house. My poor tomatoes and peppers get wind-whipped every day! Thought of you as I cleared the weeds from the asparagus bed. Threw all the slugs into the woods, found a toad, so I installed a flowerpot house for it!

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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

nltaff wrote:Everything looks so beautiful! Wondering, how did you get rid of the mite infestation on the tomatoes?
THANK YOU! :D

Mites -- Pest mites are my nemesis. Overwintered tomatoes and lately even seedlings started in late winter when the mites are at their worst due to heat-dried indoor air are infested with one kind of mite or other. One year, I had (never before seen or heard of) two-spotted mites on a tomato in one bedroom, nowhere else. I tried to save it but couldn't. After that, I realized I had better things to do with my time than to try to kill invisible pests and save the plants.

Even before that, the quintessential houseplant pest -- red spider mites -- had been an occasional problem. And every single time, if I could just keep the plants alive until it was warm enough in spring, all I had to do was to acclimate and put them outside, and they recovered. Now I have TRM's (Tomato Russet Mites) and possibly Broad Mites, too? I can't see them without going to the trouble of using the microscope or other magnifying gear? BAH forget it. :roll:

~~ If I can just get them out where they can be found, the Invisible Garden Patrol will get to work, eradicating the near-invisible pests. ~~

It's the same for these tomato plants. Once hardened off and planted in the ground, most of them will turn around. It's the ones that are still in tiny seed starting containers that are still suffering. Too much stress and I think the appropriate Garden Patrol can't find them as easily. I do put the seedling flats on the ground among flowers that they like, and I was trying to uppot them and turn them around and get them to grow back enough to plant, but I'm seeing signs that that's a wrong way of thinking. They won't turn around unless I plant them in the ground. Some I planted as nothing left but sticks are now starting to re-grow.

~~ This is why I won't use pesticides of any kind unless for very limited use with limited group of plants. I don't know what I'm doing, but THEY DO. ~~

I planted a few more "nothing left but sticks" We shall see.... :| If the humid/muggy season with accompanying fungal issues, and high temps and drought will hold off a little longer, they might be able to make it even if they have been considerably set back. Once they settle in after planting and the root system find good soil and earthworms and the rest of the soil foodweb become integrated and established, hopefully they will take off.
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applestar
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

nltaff wrote:...And hasn't the weather been just so so uncooperative? I've awakened to 40, even 39 degrees for a little over a week now, and I'm just tired of carrying my basil flats in and out of the house. My poor tomatoes and peppers get wind-whipped every day! Thought of you as I cleared the weeds from the asparagus bed. Threw all the slugs into the woods, found a toad, so I installed a flowerpot house for it!
39-40°F ? -- that's tough :( Too low for even tomatoes, so warm weather plants must be suffering. For me, the sudden cool down to overnights in the 50's have actually been a blessing since the peas and broccoli that were threatening to finish up and die due to the "skip spring temperatures and go for full burn heatwave" have had a reprieve.

(That said, it's 87°F out there right now. :x )

...I'm honored that you thought of me as you were throwing away (or was it WHILE YOU WERE COLLECTING) slugs..... :> :()
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applestar
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

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Yesterday, I went around tucking in pre-germinated okra seeds in here and there, dry basil seeds, dill seeds, cilantro seeds, edamame seeds, and one variety of bush beans.

Looked at one narrow Unprepped bed thinking I had planned to put something there, but couldn't remember and was also not up to getting out the tools to weed, hoe, fork, amend and fertilize... So that will be for another day. (Realized after coming inside and updating my maps and garden journal that I meant to sow a bunch of bush beans there -- definitely need to get that done)

Another weird day/night -- went up to 90°F and currently 80°F out there (it should really be in low 60's, even high 50's). This is going to precipitate spontaneous emergence of bad bugs. ugh. :?
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imafan26
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

You are having wierd weather. I am getting rain now but the temperatures are 78-86 which is pretty normal for this time of the year.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

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applestar
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

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Those loose garlic -- I noticed one of the Tzan Turban garlic foliage had gone completely yellow and tried to dig it up. The yellowed stem came off and the entire bulb was in the process of losing all of the paper to spoilage. But when I washed off the dirt and broke up the cloves to rub and rinse off all the softened layers, these clean and firm cloves came out. They look good and usable right away, though obviously not for storage.

The other one is from SFHX -- probably a smaller elephant garlic.

The big onion is the one that I'd stuck in the corner of the SIP with Hari and Pea eggplants last year. Even though I had laid the tub on its side for the winter, it just kept going and didn't bolt when grown alongside the spring broccoli (when I planted the broccoli earlier in spring, the onion looked so pathetic I was going to pull it... But didn't). The neck fell over a couple of days ago so I decided to harvest it, especially since I can't let the SIP dry out.

Smaller onion came from the hanging basket of crazy strawberries that I had overwintered in the garage V8. I stuck a few ONION bottoms in there,must for fun. I harvested this one today and another one about the same size a couple of days ago, but there is a monster red onion in the middle of the basket still growing. I think I must have went way overboard with nitrogen rich organic fertilizer when I first planted, thinking this will feed the onions. (and obviously it did) But the strawberriy's foliage has also been growing like mad and it's only just this past week that it has started to bloom. :roll:
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applestar
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Here's an update on that tiny VGB patch of Kandy Korn x Glass Gem F1 that I interplanted with Marrowfat peas. Obviously not all corn plants are growing well -- making their own selection -- but the ones that ARE doing well look pretty good, I think. :D
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One of them was obviously having trouble despite a good start, and I was starting to see chewed up leaf edges. After wondering if it might be slugs, I tried pouring some water in the center tubular cup of leaves -- for no reason except that I wanted to see how the new leaves were growing or not growing more clearly, and it looked "muddy" in there.

...As soon as the water washed clear, I could see a FAT cutworm coiled up in there. :evil: All gone now :twisted: and the same plant is looking great!
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lakngulf
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

Produce looks great.
Nutin as good as a kitchen sink mater sammich

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Lindsaylew82
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

lakngulf wrote:Produce looks great.
Sho do!
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nltaff
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Re: Applestar's 2016 Garden

applestar wrote
thinking of me when throwing away slugs
Actually, no, not the slug part, the fetching a pot to half-bury for the toad part. :D I once paid a student of mine, back in the 90s a nickel for every toad he brought me (I supplied the shoeboxes).
As for the temps, the tomatoes and peppers have done fine during all these cold morning starts, especially the ones in the bales (because I haven't fully removed the cover). Looking at the forecast, I promised them full freedom tomorrow (as tonight's low is the last one in the 40s for at least a week and a half. Everyone around here is shaking heads over this strange stint of April-like weather. Anyway, I haven't lost anything yet, and everything is producing blossoms. As a bonus, usually, by this time the beet greens are looking ratty, but they are, to date, pristine and looking yummy. Cold has kept the earwigs and other munchers at bay.

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