Cee_Jay
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Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 1:41 pm
Location: Mason, Ohio

Japanese Beetles....ugh!

I had a beautiful english rose bush that looks like some kind of strange sea anemone since the beetles came. What is the quickest way to get ride of them and save my rose bush! I have used the Bayer product and it seemed to help. Is there another way, or product (organic, perhaps) to make them leave? :(
Gardening is Zen to me. It takes me far from any stress and pressure and puts me into a peaceful place.

Anonymous

Re: Japanese Beetles....ugh!

Cee_Jay wrote:I had a beautiful english rose bush that looks like some kind of strange sea anemone since the beetles came. What is the quickest way to get ride of them and save my rose bush! I have used the Bayer product and it seemed to help. Is there another way, or product (organic, perhaps) to make them leave? :(
Picking them off and tossing into bucket of bleach water is the quickest way.
IMO, <Bayer products suck> Sorry, but that stuff does half the job while killing every good bug there is. Personal experience ...

Longer term solution: Plant LARKSPUR.
[img]https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/Wildseed/flowers/RocketLarkspur.jpg[/img]RE:[url]https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/Wildseed/rocketlarkspur.html[/url]
It is an annual. You might still get blossoms this year if you hurry, not sure. It can be planted in late fall(normally is) for spring plants.
Jap Beetles love it. They eat and DIE. :evil:

:!:
FAIR WARNING: ALL PARTS OF LARKSPUR ARE POISONOUS!

Do not plant if there is any chance of consumption by humans.
Especially do not plant where cows, goats, etc. can get to it. They will eat it and get very sick &|R die.
:!:

CMA: I have not yet gotten the larkspur going but have read many times that it is the " organic " method for controlling Jap Beetles as well as grasshoppers|locusts. I do NOT know if it is really true.

RE: https://www.ghorganics.com/JapaneseBeetle.html
...plenty of others out there. Google is your friend, :).


Have Fun!

Ivy
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Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2008 6:25 pm
Location: Upstate NY

I also heard that Four O'Clocks is another plant that they love and it will kill them ,too...Guess I'll try both next year!!!
The Accidental Gardener

Anonymous

Yea there are some others too. I like this one because kelp is really good for foliar feeding.
"
KELP: When used in a powder mixture or tea as a spray, this versatile sea herb will not only repel insects but feed the vegetables. In particular we have observed that kelp foliar sprays keep aphids and Japanese beetles away when used as a spray every 8 days before and during infestation times. If you have access to seaweed, use it as a mulch to keep slugs away.
"
RE: [url]https://www.ghorganics.com/page2.html[/url]

I use it and can say where I do the aphids are at least fewer. It does ZERO for repelling whiteflies ... :(
Also, NEVER use kelp solution on a Scheffelera or, I suspect, any other plant that has waxy leaves for show. It stains them semi-permanently to be removed only when the plant finally sheds that inner coating - over a year for the schef.
I never saw the same on any other plant(including the roses) but I have no others like the schefflera.

I should mention that I think Bonide's "Garden Dust" will also work since it is rotenone and (ithink) most everyone keeps some of that around. It also contains copper so is NOT for every plant ... IOW, read the label to be sure.
There is rotenone with pyrethrins wettable dust and liquid out there but that's almost the same problem as the Bayer stuff: pyrethrins kill almost every bug. However, it kills on contact only unless mixed with some synergist that makes it stay around longer. ...I'm rambling on again. :roll:

C-ya ...

Have Fun!

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JennyC
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Posts: 310
Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 6:25 pm
Location: NW Georgia

Ivy, I have four o'clocks and (unfortunately) didn't notice them killing any Japanese Beetles. I was overrun with them. OTOH, they didn't eat the four o'clocks, so maybe the plants repel them. And I had so many of the @#$% beetles, the four o'clocks couldn't possibly have made a noticable impact anyway!
Jenny C

Anonymous

Jenny,
That's depressing. The last thing I read was that they had only migrated as far south and west as Kentucky. It appears that they are now in all counties of KY and I suppose that means they will soon be here too. I do not want
[img]https://www.ca.uky.edu/entomology/entfacts/images/jb.jpg[/img]
here. We have enough (bad) bugs!

When infestations of any insect are particularly bad I found only two things that can work.
One is to cover the plants you need to save with barrier material. One does not get to look at the plants but the material will allow light(70-75%) & water though it so the plants don't mind. When the worst is over, just remove the cover.
The other is to anticipate the problem and setup (plant) trap plants some good distance away and when the bugs think they are having their cake and eating it too, so to speak, kill them with poisons that one would not use on other plants or, if bad enough, pour kerosene over them and burn them. (do _NOT_ use gasoline - it is much too volatile).

Well, there is a third, which I have done: yank all the plants and toss them into a closed bin. Two years ago it was the cowpea curculio
[img]https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/Graphics/beanpeains/curc.jpg[/img]
on peas; this year the harlequin
[img]https://creatures.ifas.ufl.edu/veg/leaf/harlequin_adult.jpg[/img]
on brassica.
I still have a few of the harlequin as I caught them a bit late but the trap plants and "Garden Dust" got most of them.

Actually I have to make a mix and spray today(now), in spite of the heat, because aphids
[img]https://www.ext.vt.edu/departments/entomology/ornamentals/1-3.jpeg[/img]
are so bad.


IOW, Jap beetles are going to have plenty of competition if|when they show here.

Have Fun!

PS
Harlequin are the worst - very hard to kill and apparently even harder to remove from the property! " If infestations are heavy and food becomes scarce, harlequin bugs will also feed on squash, corn, bean, asparagus, okra, and tomato."
I have found that they also feed on chard and arugula, which certainly covers everything, except peppers & edible|medicinal plants, I normally grow. :(

RE:
https://www.ca.uky.edu/entomology/entfacts/ef409.asp
https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/hgic2201.htm & https://www.ivyhall.district96.k12.il.us/4th/KKhp/1insects/harlequin.html
https://creatures.ifas.ufl.edu/veg/leaf/harlequin_bug.htm
https://www.ext.vt.edu/departments/entomology/ornamentals/aphids.html

mogardener
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Posts: 21
Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2008 8:21 pm
Location: Missouri

There are probably much better ways of killing Japanese beetles, but I have just gotten back from my garden round this evening & squished a good twenty of these pests. I like to visit my garden & kill the pests as I go, although my more squeamish friend votes for the water with dishwashing soap in which to dump them.

Of course, I am the same person who fills bowls with cheap beer to kill slugs (you can't buy beer at 4 a.m. in Missouri, even if you swear it is for the slugs)! :lol:
"If only you could teach a dog to bury bulbs" - isn't it the truth?!?

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megshepardson
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Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 5:19 pm
Location: Southern CA

Gettin' those Japanese Beetles......

I'll never forget my grandfathers garden...perfectly coifed lawn and impeccable roses. We were always amazed at his contraption for capturing and eliminating the massive amounts of beetles that were attracted to his roses.
It was an old mayonnaise jar with flue like top (so they couldn't get out)somehow connected to the old screw on top, hanging from a hook on a thin metal post about three feet off the ground. There were at least 4-5 dispersed throughout the roses. Inside the jars was a liquid the beetles found irresistable, but I'm not sure if it was sugar water, or soapy water but I have a suspicion it was kerosine. I was young.
But it worked really well considering the amount of beetles that were in there.
Hope I helped.......
Oh, that was summer(obviously)in Westeren MA by the way

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JennyC
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Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 6:25 pm
Location: NW Georgia

That's depressing. The last thing I read was that they had only migrated as far south and west as Kentucky. It appears that they are now in all counties of KY and I suppose that means they will soon be here too. I do not want
Can't speak to the western extent, but I can vouch that they're now well south of Kentucky. Alive and well and eating blackberries in north Georgia (or were, they're done for the year now).

There are Japanese Beetle traps, which is what I'll use next year (this year, I applied patience until their three-week lifespan was over. Oh, and I picked my apples green, before the beetles wanted them. More pectin that way, anyway, and I got the apples, not the beetles.)

The thing about the pheremone traps, they are so attractive that beetles will come from miles around to get them. You want to put them far away from the stuff you want to protect.
Jenny C

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