Ash
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2007 8:01 pm

Planting roses in same position as removed old roses

I understand it is not a good idea to Plant new roses in same position as removed old roses but I have little choice. The old roses have come to the end of their life but are disease free.

I watched a video on the BBC`s gardening page and Monty Don mentioned something you can add when planting, I could`nt make out the full name of it though. It was something like microriser or Macrariser.

Have any of you heard of this and if so could you give me the correct name?

With kind regards, Ash

doccat5
Green Thumb
Posts: 399
Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:48 am
Location: VA

Might it be Messenger? That's a hot "new" treatment for rose. I don't know why you could replant in the same area. I would work new soil and amendments into the area before planting the new bushes. But can't see where you'd have any problems since you say the older ones are disease free. That I would think would be the only issue.
doccat5

I'd rather be gardening!

Ash
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2007 8:01 pm

thanks Doccat

I tried my local garden centre and they have not heard of the product either,so I will have to do it the hard way and replace the soil.

Thank you for your reply , Ash

MaineDesigner
Green Thumb
Posts: 439
Joined: Thu Nov 09, 2006 11:17 am
Location: Midcoast Maine, Zone 5b

What you are looking for is mycorrhizae, fungi that live symbiotically with the plant roots. This is an extremely controversial area in the horticultural world. There is very little evidence at this point that the packaged mycorrhizae are effective. This would be especially true in the commonly high fertilizer input and potentially high fungicide use (shudder) realm of rose cultivation.

doccat5
Green Thumb
Posts: 399
Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:48 am
Location: VA

I certainly would not use mycorrhizae, on my roses. That's not what it's intended for. I have however used it on both my black walnuts and magnolias with good results.

Messenger is being touted as the new "cure" all for roses, it's billed as a plant health activator. Evidently it acts much like a beneficial pathogen and triggers the plant's "immune" system to increase it's defenses against disease.

I find this very interesting and want to do a bit more research before using this. I find the research results to extremely interesting and have gotten some good feedback from friends and fellow rosarians who have used it.

I'm not sure it will "play" with the Bokashi and I intend to try that this year to improve the health of my soil. Normally my biggest problem is black spot with my hybrid teas, and I don't use fungicides, I do use organic methods to deal with the problem.

You can google for Messenger for roses for more information.
doccat5

I'd rather be gardening!

Pamela2323
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 10:01 am

Replanting roses in an area where your old roses died might not be the best solution. That's at least what our [url=https://www.serenataflowers.com]UK florists[/url] recommended when we tried the same. You should try to find another place or grow them in a container. Good luck with your roses.
If I'm ever reborn, I want to be a gardener—
there's too much to do for one lifetime!



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