Mariposa
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Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2006 10:24 pm

brand new to roses and have a "rose surprise" rose

I bought a rose on clearance from my local Wal-Mart. It didnt have a tag or a flower on it anywhere. Not even a dropped petal to give me a clue as to what color the blooms would be. I bought it for $4 dollars. I called it my "surprise" rose since I havent a clue as to what kind it is. Its home now and I've had it in the pot I bought it in for about 2 weeks. I really didnt want to have to plant it in the yard as this house isnt ours and I want to take it with me when I move. The problem is this. Some of the leaves are getting yellow and lots of the leaves are getting black spots. I read a previous post about this but it wasnt clear as to whether it was a fungus or a problem with water and sunlight. Should I maybe plant it in a sunny spot in my yard? I'm in Louisiana and our winters are mild. I read somewhere I should prune it back and plant it and put mulch or something around it to protect it from winter. What would you suggest? Thanks in advance for the advice. :)

Flowerpots
Full Member
Posts: 41
Joined: Tue Oct 03, 2006 12:07 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Roses like at least 4 - 6 hours of ggod sun each day, yes prune back in winter hard, here a video link that may help you.

https://www.magicgardenroses.com.au/

hope this helps.

Newt
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Posts: 1868
Joined: Tue May 25, 2004 10:44 pm
Location: Maryland zone 7

Hi Mariposa,

Sounds like you may have a treasure.

With no offense to Flowerpots, keep in mind that she's in the southern hemisphere and you are in the northern hemisphere. That means that her summer is winter here and summer here is her winter. Generally in the US, roses are pruned hard in late winter or early spring before new growth begins.

Black spot is a fungal problem and can occur from lack of sunlight, poor air circulation, stress, too much moisture or just take your pick. Some roses are more prone to it then others. You can use a fungal spray that you can make yourself.
https://www.ghorganics.com/page15.html

I'm sure you don't know which type of rose you have as to climber, bush, tea or otherwise, but the site that Flowerpots gave you looks great for pruning and other info.

Louisiana has hardiness zones 8 and 9. Check to see if your rose is rootbound. This isn't the best time to repot it, but if it's severely rootbound you could put it in a pot that is 2" larger. If you are in zone 9 you can keep it in the pot on a patio, etc. If you are in zone 8 you might want to insulate the pot when you get frosts. If you'll be moving within a year, you can sink the rose, in the pot, into the ground and just pull the pot when you move. If you put the pot in the ground you won't need to worry about insulating it. Just add some mulch.

Once your rose blooms next year you might be able to id it here.
https://www.everyrose.com/everyrose/index.lasso

Newt

Flowerpots
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Posts: 41
Joined: Tue Oct 03, 2006 12:07 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Hey Newt Im way down sth. heading towards to south Pole LOL Australia most southern pont, cockadile dundee country , not Austria ??

Newt
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Posts: 1868
Joined: Tue May 25, 2004 10:44 pm
Location: Maryland zone 7

Flowerpots, I know where Austria is and where Australia is. Who said anything about Austria? Not sure where you got that from. Besides, Austria is in the northern hemisphere and Australia is in the southern hemisphere. So, when it's winter in Austria and the US, it's summer in Australia. At least that's the way it is where my son lives in South America. :D

Newt

Flowerpots
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Posts: 41
Joined: Tue Oct 03, 2006 12:07 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

With no offense to Flowerpots, keep in mind that she's in the southern hemisphere and you are in the northern hemisphere.
Im confused :roll:

Newt
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Posts: 1868
Joined: Tue May 25, 2004 10:44 pm
Location: Maryland zone 7

Gosh Flowerpots, I didn't mean to confuse you. Let's try this. The earth is separated by the equator into the northern hemisphere and the southern hemisphere. You can see the equator in this picture.
https://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0908193.html

From this site:
https://www.scienceu.com/observatory/articles/seasons/seasons.html
...the seasons get reversed when we cross the equator: when it is Summer in the northern hemisphere, it is Winter in the southern one, and vice versa.
So right now in Australia it's spring. Here in the US it's autumn.

Hope that helps.
Newt

Flowerpots
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Posts: 41
Joined: Tue Oct 03, 2006 12:07 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

:lol: don't worry about it newt, you said I was in the Northern hems. :lol:

Newt
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Posts: 1868
Joined: Tue May 25, 2004 10:44 pm
Location: Maryland zone 7

Flowerpots, I don't mean to be argumentative, but I've read and reread and reread my posts and don't see where I said Australia is in the northern hemisphere. Maybe I'm missing something. I wrote:

Hi Mariposa,

Sounds like you may have a treasure.

With no offense to Flowerpots, keep in mind that she's in the southern hemisphere and you are in the northern hemisphere. That means that her summer is winter here and summer here is her winter. Generally in the US, roses are pruned hard in late winter or early spring before new growth begins.
Hope that clarifies it for you. It's really not all that important, but I like to correct my mistakes and I can't find it. Maybe you thought my post to Mariposa was to you?

Newt

Cactus Joe
Full Member
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2006 5:02 pm
Location: North West Pacific

Mariposa,
Which came first - the black spots or the yellowing of the leaves? If the black spots appeared, then affected leaves turn yellow and drop off, that is the natural history of this particular fungal infection. If that's the case, get rid of all the diseased leaves - throw them away in the garbage can and keep the ground as clean as possible. Prune the weak canes, but leave the thicker canes, even if they are leafless, alone. Blackspot needs moist condition and warm temperatures to spread - once the days of cooler temperatures arrive, there is likely still time new foliage to emerge in your area (not in our zone - it's too late, but we wait in anticipation for the spring).

If the leaves turned yellow before the black spots appeared, or if there are yellow leaves without black spots, then you will need to investigate for other problems - poor drainage, overwatering, poor nutrition.

Did your rose come as a potted rose or a bareroot? I would guess it was potted. Those poor roses inn the W marts have to put up with small containers, and by this time would have been totally root bound. In addition, if the W Marts in our town is anything to judge by, they do not take care of the roses well - they are not fertilised. So, by now, they are weak and unhealthy presentatives of their kind. But all is not lost. Given tender loving care and the right type of conditions, you can still salvage your rose. What it needs to do is to putt down a good root system, that will support good top growth.

Healthy roses are definitely more disease resistant than less than healthy ones. So, give it the sunniest spot you can find - it needs 6 or more hours of sun to thrive. Ammend the soil well - lots of organics will help retain moisture, keep the soil microbes happy and abundant, help aeration and retent soil nutrients. Fertilise as recommended for your local soil - your local nursery (not Walmart!) should be able to give you good guidelines. Provide constant moisture, do not allow to dry out, but don't over water. Do mulch - it keeps the weeds at bay and retains moisture. It's not necessary for special winter protection if your winter temperature is not going to go below freezing.

lefty317
Full Member
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Dec 28, 2006 8:58 pm
Location: st. louis, missouri

this thing definitely needs more soil, the pots that roses come in from wal-mart home depot etc, are only about 2 gallons (9" diameter x 9" tall). the big box stores aren't trying to grow them, just keep them alive until they are sold so the 2" bigger rule doesn't apply here (sorry newt). if you want to keep the rose in a container, i think something in the neighborhood of 15-16" diameter x height is what we need to shoot for. if weight is a concern, potting soil, mixed with a humus/composted manure additive is lighter than garden soil.... don't use plain old dirt from the garden unless it is very rich in organic matter. and even in a container, a layer of organic will be of benefit.

chris

Newt
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Posts: 1868
Joined: Tue May 25, 2004 10:44 pm
Location: Maryland zone 7

Hi Lefty aka Chris!!

Wonderful to see you here and welcome to The Helpful Gardener. :D I'm glad you cleared that up for me. Hope you can help with the rose questions as well as others.

Newt



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