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hendi_alex
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Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

Lilacs, so excited!

Two years ago my daughter bought a house in Greensboro, NC. That spring I found a neglected lilac in an overgrown section of the yard, and that plant has the loveliest powder blue flowers. Though I live in Camden, well in zone 8, I took some cuttings, two of which rooted. In the meantime we bought three other lilacs. One is Miss Kim which is supposed to bloom in zone eight. Another is President Grevey which is rated up to zone 7. The other lost its tag, but I think as well is rated up to zone 7. All five plants are planted in containers. Today during my daily inspection of the yard, I noticed the most wonderful thing. Four of the five plants have flowering spikes that will soon be opening. This is particularly exciting because the plants are not really supposed to bloom here. Also the plants are very young, with my cuttings being 2 years old and the other plants just purchased last spring. I can't wait on the flowers to open as it will be such a treat to be able to enjoy lilacs in this area where lilacs don't generally grow or bloom.

Plant with lost label.
[img]https://farm6.static.flickr.com/5254/5522735995_ed3252c871_o.jpg[/img]

My young cutting:
[img]https://farm6.static.flickr.com/5058/5522735629_53625a10d9_o.jpg[/img]

Miss Kim:
[img]https://farm6.static.flickr.com/5060/5522736809_a3bcced7d2_o.jpg[/img]

President Grevy.
[img]https://farm6.static.flickr.com/5211/5522736417_ed329a1774_o.jpg[/img]
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

keskat
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How exciting for you! :D I love the smell of lilacs - growing up, we always had huge bushes at the side of our yard, and they had the most wonderful smell, not to mention the purely aesthetic beauty! I hope they flourish for you!
Bloom where you're planted!

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hendi_alex
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If these fail to survive and continue to bloom, then my next move will be to buy some California Lilacs(Ceanothus) and/or will try some of the low chill varieties of lilacssuch as Blue Skies or Angel White.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

All five plants are planted in containers.
That's an interesting possible technique. :idea:

When talking container grown plants, the advice is to subtract a zone for winter hardiness. In this case, it sounds like you are using that to your advantage.

What about the opposite end of the extreme? Would you need to/have you been shading the containers during the summer to protect from sun and heat?

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hendi_alex
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So far the containers have been kept on the east side of a large oak tree. They get full sun in the morning, filtered light for a couple of hours, and then indirect light for the rest of the day. I'll move the containers to a 'show' location when the plants are in bloom, and then back to the nursery area for the rest of the year. Another technique that I've heard, is to place some ice in the top of the container several times during the winter and that can help contribute to the chilling hours needed for blooms to set. I'll likely use that technique on my peonies if we have a milder than normal winter. But for the past several years, the peonies are sending up quite a show, so no problem so far.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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applestar
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:D. it made me smile to think that in my neighborhood, east side of a large oak tree sounds like a prime location that would not be given over to plants during the summer heat. but of course you have many large oak trees. :wink:

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hendi_alex
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My problem is in finding an east side of a large oak which is not shaded by the west side of the next oak tree over.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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hendi_alex
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This is the first of my lilacs in full bloom here in zone 8. Shame that I lost the label and don't remember the variety ordered. Am quite pleased with the plant however. It is now about 3 feet tall in its container which will be sized up to maybe a 5 gallon this spring. Other lilacs are about a week behind this one and flowers should be opening on them very soon.

[img]https://farm6.static.flickr.com/5309/5571076163_bff3bf21f4_o.jpg[/img]
Last edited by hendi_alex on Tue Mar 29, 2011 5:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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