User avatar
PunkRotten
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1990
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:48 am
Location: Monterey, CA.

Is this a moss or lichen?

Hi,

There are a few types of moss and/or lichen on the property here. I've been interested in collecting them for perhaps some terrariums I am going to set up. Anyway, the first one I am not sure if it is a moss or lichen. The 2nd one grows on lots of plants and trees. It hangs on lots of oak trees in the area but attaches to other plants/trees too. I am wondering if it may be parasitic in some way. Because every plant/tree I see with this moss on it seems to be in poor health or dying. Thanks

20151230_154958.jpg
20151230_154958.jpg (38.17 KiB) Viewed 476 times
20151230_154953.jpg
20151230_154953.jpg (37.49 KiB) Viewed 476 times
20151230_155130.jpg
20151230_155130.jpg (51.56 KiB) Viewed 476 times
20151230_160112.jpg
20151230_155109.jpg
20151230_155056.jpg

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27803
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Is this a moss or lichen?

First one is lichen.
Second beard-like one I think is Spanish moss.

I remember being enchanted by seeing them all over trees near Williamsburg. They don't survive the winters here.
Spanish moss - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_moss

The plant's specific name usneoides means "resembling Usnea", and it indeed closely resembles its namesake Usnea, also known as beard lichen, but in fact Spanish moss is neither a moss nor a lichen. Instead, it is a flowering plant (angiosperm) in the family Bromeliaceae (the bromeliads
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

imafan26
Mod
Posts: 11269
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 1:32 pm
Location: hawaii, zone 12a 587 ft elev.

Re: Is this a moss or lichen?

I have spanish moss on the trees and the fence. It likes to be watered daily but does not need any fertilizer or soil.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

Return to “Plant Identification”