Branth
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Old hyphenated plant names?

So, confession time - I'm not a gardener. :oops: I really know nothing about it, and probably couldn't grow weeds if I tried. That said, I am dating someone who likes gardening, and is rather proud of his work, and he mentioned that he likes old victorian-sounding hyphenated plant names, like "kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate," "Welcome-home-husband-though-never-so-drunk," etc. I'd like to get him one or two of these plants as a gift, but I have no idea where to start. I'm planning on learning a bit about the conditions in his garden, what he has room for, etc, and picking out a plant or two I can lay hands on.

Can anyone give me some ideas of plants that have such absurdly long names that I might be able to find or order from somewhere? Should I get seeds, or a live plant? Any information would be greatly appreciated! My google skills are generally pretty good, but I haven't had any luck, so I thought I could consult some experts.

DoubleDogFarm
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

These plants have common names, but if you put them together, you may find it interesting.

My garden is rated R for the "Saxifrage and Violet"

Well, I think its funny. :lol:

Eric

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Mr_bobo_
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

Branth wrote: I really know nothing about it, and probably couldn't grow weeds if I tried.
I try once. and fail... with Fumaria officinalis...
Branth wrote: "kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate,"
..google say that's Persicaria orientalis ...
Branth wrote: "Welcome-home-husband-though-never-so-drunk,"
...google say that's : Sedum acre
My Garden at: www.borisvrt.webs.com

DoubleDogFarm
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

"Mind Your Own Business" is part of the nettle family and is known more scientifically as Soleirolia soleirolii and it's a vigorous creeping plant. It is ideal when planted as ground or wall cover and is covered with tiny green, silver or golden leaves, depending on the variety chosen.

I also know of a plant called dama de noche, and in english, it means "lady of the night". It is called dama de noche because it emits its fragrance only at the night. This plant/flower crawls so it is common to see it up in trees or in fences. it is very rare that you will see one in the ground.

I had no idea Rattan is known as Wait-a-While

This plant is called Love in a Puff

Here's the Hosta Mighty Mouse coming to save the day

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

Love-lies-bleeding is my favorite of those old plant names!
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!potatoes!
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

that is a good one...an amaranth, right?

there's also nigella, love-in-a-mist

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MarcP
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

!potatoes! wrote:that is a good one...an amaranth, right?

there's also nigella, love-in-a-mist
Thank you, !potatoes! Ever since I saw this post, I've been trying to remember the name of that plant (Love-in-a-mist). I only heard about it a couple of weeks ago and thought it was a great name.
Retired in S.E. Michigan

Branth
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

There's a lot of good ideas here! A bit of reading indicates that love in a puff seeds were an old-timey valentine's gift, so I might have to get some of those. Apparently, they're considered an invasive species in some states, though... >.< He'd also probably appreciate the humor of "mind your own business," being a reclusive guy in a relatively small town.

I'll have to ponder which ones to get, but the information is much appreciated!

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MarcP
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

rainbowgardener wrote:Love-lies-bleeding is my favorite of those old plant names!
That's quite a beautiful plant, Rainbowgardner. I should look for one.
Retired in S.E. Michigan

cynthia_h
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

I absolutely *cannot* believe that this was posted during my "sabbatical." One of the books I read while away discussed these long-phrased native plants of Great Britain! Your wistful, romantic gardener will be blown away when he opens his own, his very own copy of Weeds: In Defense of Nature's Most Unloved Plants, by Richard Mabey, one of Britain's most widely published gardening authors.

Mabey makes a strong case that, in Britain at least, "weed" is a term applied to native plants which are no longer in agricultural favor. I checked his book out of the library, thinking it was a survey of North American plants, but when I found it focused on British (specifically English) plants back to the Neolithic Age, I had to continue reading. (Grandparents H. were raised in Hampshire.) These exact phrases are used in the book as traditional descriptions of various plants.

Wow. And I don't even remember him discussing nettles....

Cynthia H.
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rainbowgardener
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

awww, cynthia, you didn't even tell us, did your book have any examples of the "long-phrased native plants of Great Britain" that we haven't come up with? Tell ! :) I'm not going to go read the book, so you don't have to worry about spoiling the ending. :)
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cynthia_h
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

:oops: I turned it back in to the library. I didn't take notes, because 1) if we read it as a forum book, we'll all be seeing them, and 2) if we don't read it as a forum book, well...I can check it out again. :)

Guess I'd better opt for 2), huh? :wink:

Cynthia

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

Apparently no one likes mothers in law. There's a very spiky cactus known as Mother-in-law's cushion, and big long plants (aka snake plant) known as mother-in-law's tongue:

Image
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cynthia_h
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

I can confidently state that none of the traditional names for the plants included the phrase "mother-in-law." :)

That seems to be an American-ism more than a British-ism (real word?).

Cynthia

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Old hyphenated plant names?

So I've been digging around for more examples.

Found a newspaper article from 1938 with some more examples:

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=8 ... 016,743944

and this:

https://www.nationalpost.com/homes/Garde ... story.html

It says that the viola we still sometimes call Johnny jump up, in Shakespearean times was known as meet-her-in-the-entry-kiss-her-in-the-buttery, as well as come and cuddle me, pink of my Joan, kiss-me, tickle my fancy, kiss me ere I rise, jump up and kiss me, and other names.

Trillium was called wake robin, because it blooms early in spring and brings the robins.

Nice topic! Are we having fun yet? :)
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