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watermelonpunch
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Location: Pennsylvania USA

Re: Field and Roadside weeds

Here's what I think is bindweed:

Image
(w/ garlic mustard I believe... under a pine tree)

Apparently there have been reports of Mile A Minute somewhere not far from where the photo was taken.

So which is it? Is it obvious?
I don't think this looks much like a triangle, it's distinctly arrow-like.
And, it's more arrow-like than the bind weed I've seen at home.

I think it's definitely not buckwheat.
Though I can't be sure about my bindweed at home, because I've never seen it flower. (I ripped it out last year before it got flowers because I thought it was ugly and annoying.)
Northeastern Pennsylvania
USDA zone 6a bordering 5b, Sunset Zone 37 bordering 42
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watermelonpunch
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Location: Pennsylvania USA

Re: Field and Roadside weeds

RE: Knotweed

Something else entirely. Though it has leaves that are VAGUELY heart-shaped.

It's not a vine, it's a bush.

I would liken its growth habit to a large scale St John's Wort or Hardy Hibiscus bush.
For example, the knotweed, you can cut all the stems right to the ground, and the next year, the bush quickly grows to its original size with new branches.

I don't know why the big cheese I was talking to had that come to mind, I think because of the vaguely heart-shaped leaves. But it was just happened to be in the conversation of invasive plant species & problems with them, and he showed me a picture of knotweed and immediately recognized it as my unidentified bushes around my neighborhood.
I can't find a picture of mine :/ I thought I took some but I can't find them now.

But this is how the bush looks at the base:

Image

The stems are seemingly hollow, but they have to be chopped almost individually... I do it with a hand clipper, and then with a hand branch clipper for the tougher parts.
My husband refuses to use the hedge trimmer on them, because a) most of them are beyond the property line and b) the one that's not is close to other things, and c) he thinks it could actually stress the trimmer in some detrimental way, and he sees the hedge trimmer as solely for use on our evergreen juniper bushes which he likes to trim in kind of an artistic way ... though he hasn't gone as far as making a topiary sculpture yet, but I expect someday to come home & find our junipers trimmed to look like Hello Kitty or something. LOL

From what I was told by the head honcho where I work, who has had to manage eradicating some of these bushes, it is nearly impossible to remove it by completely uproot it. It had to be eradicated in some areas with some kind of chemical herbicide treatment after having cut the bushes down to nearly nothing - this was in an area where the bushes were obstructing human use of the immediate area (and a potential hazard of some kind), and though I didn't ask about the particulars, it sounded like this was the final last resort that actually worked after unsuccessful previous attempts.
One of my neighbors last year said that she had made several unsuccessful attempts over the years to remove the bushes by uprooting. Her conclusion was that it doesn't work, and you just have to keep cutting them down, cutting them back a couple of times a year. I should specify that she had said that it was incredibly difficult to uproot them, and then the effort was all for naught.
Northeastern Pennsylvania
USDA zone 6a bordering 5b, Sunset Zone 37 bordering 42
I'm brainwashing you with this signature block.
watermelonpunch.com

JONA878
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Re: Field and Roadside weeds

Have to agree on the difficulty with Japanese Knotweed.
Over this side of the pond it's a weed that has to be notified if found as it is costing local councils a whole packet of money trying to eradicate it.
As said..the only way is to hand cut and treat with glysophate until it gives up. This can prove difficult if it is near a water course to avoid pollution.
The roots go on down to a tremendous depth so digging it out is virtually impossible.
We also have the same problem with another weed that was introduced as a novelty garden plant and escaped...The Giant Hog Weed.
This looks like a gigantic Cow Parsley..growing to several feet in height and with a flower head a couple of feet wide. Hollow stemmed the children started to use them as pea-shooters..only to find that the sap burnt the skin badly.
They too like to grow near water so are proving a nightmare to remove.
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MarcP
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Location: S.E. Michigan

Re: Field and Roadside weeds

I thought I should do a follow up on the vetch since it has blossomed. From this flower it looks like it's probably crown vetch.
Image
Retired in S.E. Michigan

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Mr_bobo_
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Location: Croatia

Re: Field and Roadside weeds

Reynoutria japonica is name of 'big plants' above...

...and this little nice pinky flower is from plant: Coronilla varia...
My Garden at: www.borisvrt.webs.com

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watermelonpunch
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Location: Pennsylvania USA

Re: Field and Roadside weeds

MarcP wrote:I thought I should do a follow up on the vetch since it has blossomed. From this flower it looks like it's probably crown vetch.
Image
Never seen this before but that's one fantastic interesting picture!!!
Northeastern Pennsylvania
USDA zone 6a bordering 5b, Sunset Zone 37 bordering 42
I'm brainwashing you with this signature block.
watermelonpunch.com

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