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rainbowgardener
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Re: A bunch of new plants found in the woods

Sorry, but I'm not seeing that.

xanthorhiza
Image

xanthorhiza is a woody stemmed shrub, with completely different flowers

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sweet cicely
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osmorhiza claytonii

A hairy plant with small sparse compound umbels of white flowers. The 1-3 ft. stems are usually solitary and covered with long, soft hairs. Leaves are divided into threes, two or three times. Open clusters (compound umbel) of small, white flowers rise above the foliage on stalks from upper leaf axils.

The roots of this plant have an anise-like odor when bruised. Several species of this genus occur in the East, among them Anise Root (O. longistylis), which has styles to 1/4 inch (4 mm) long.
https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result ... plant=OSCL

I'm frequently wrong on plant ID's and when I am, I'm glad to admit it, but I'm very familiar with sweet cicely (I said it was one of my favorites) and I stand behind my identification.
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watermelonpunch
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Re: A bunch of new plants found in the woods

#4 sure does look a lot like that sweet cicily picture.
Is this sweet cicily common in the woods in the NE US?
When I look at those, it somehow makes me think of memories of walking in the woods. The leaves only though. The flowers on them... well I was going to say the flowers don't ring any bells. :oops: But that's a bad pun perhaps. ha ha
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rainbowgardener
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Re: A bunch of new plants found in the woods

Sweet cicely is a native and is common in the woods around me. I can't really speak to the rest.

Osmorhiza claytonii, the one I am familiar with is native through out the eastern US and west to the Dakotas and Kansas as well as much of eastern Canada.

https://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?sym ... scl_1h.jpg

There are other Osmorhiza species including a western species.
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watermelonpunch
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Re: A bunch of new plants found in the woods

Here's my unremarkable bulb-rooted grass-like leaves stuff that your #6 reminded me of...

Image

No clue what it is.

I just know it has a spherical bulb root, that was and is growing rather shallow in soil in a rather poor situation one could have in flowerbeds...

The area it's growing:
mostly shade
underneath between a maple tree & fir trees
in soil that's just a bit of normal soil over the top of a highly sandy & rocky anthracite coal ash heap that's about 50+ years old (possibly dating back to 1930s)
If you dig down more than 6 inches here, you hit ash pockets & tree roots.
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rainbowgardener
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Re: A bunch of new plants found in the woods

It is a bit non-descript at the moment. At some point it probably flowered or will flower and will be much more identifiable.

The daylilies mentioned above have rhizomes not bulbs.

Some of the alliums have strap like foliage like that, as well as spider lily and surprise lily/ pink lady and other things. Possibly even daffodil foliage after it has bloomed, but that would usually be more rounded tips and anyway it would have just bloomed so you would know that.
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watermelonpunch
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Re: A bunch of new plants found in the woods

rainbowgardener wrote:It is a bit non-descript at the moment. At some point it probably flowered or will flower and will be much more identifiable.

The daylilies mentioned above have rhizomes not bulbs.

Some of the alliums have strap like foliage like that, as well as spider lily and surprise lily/ pink lady and other things. Possibly even daffodil foliage after it has bloomed, but that would usually be more rounded tips and anyway it would have just bloomed so you would know that.
Hmmm... well what I have pictured is always nondescript, and has never ever bloomed.
They also never die back. They stay looking like that pretty much always.

Well, except in the winter snow they seem to either die back or at least hunker down or something. Here's the area they're in...

Image
You can see them on either side here... tall grass like stuff on either side.

Here are some pictures same area from winter:

Image

Image

Image

I know they have bulbs because I transplanted them from one side to the other, to make a path up through and thinned them out somewhat. They were even more crowded when I did this last spring.
It was last year when I just started into this ground gardening thing... so I really can't describe the bulbs accurately from memory.

I do have some allium in the same area, that bloomed recently. Those had much stronger sort of leaves, and larger more rounded bulbs maybe.
Not quite sure how to describe that. The alliums just seemed to have a bit more fortitude or something.

It could be that these have never gotten enough sun to bloom?
Could be at some point in the past they bloomed when the surrounding trees were not so big I suppose.

Only thing I can think of now to do would be to transplant a few of them to a sunny location and see what happens in the future at some point.
When I do that I'll try & remember to take a picture of the exposed bulbs.
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purpleinopp
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Re: A bunch of new plants found in the woods

There are hundreds of Allium species. You could tear a leaf of your mystery bulbs to see if the scent provides any clues. Since there are plenty, maybe you want to dig one up and take its' picture? That foliage reminds me of Lycoris squamigera which, when mature and undisturbed, makes a pink flower very late in the season. Also called naked ladies because by the time the flower shows up, the foliage has died back. Whatever they are, moving to more sun could induce bloom if that area is usually shady throughout the day.

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rainbowgardener
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Re: A bunch of new plants found in the woods

yeah, the naked ladies are what I was calling pink ladies/ surprise lily. AKA resurrection lily. All the surprise / resurrection names are because all the foliage dies back and then surprise! in August a tall flower spike jumps up very fast.
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watermelonpunch
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Re: A bunch of new plants found in the woods

purpleinopp - thank you for giving me the latin name for those. LOL
Never saw blooms like that... (looked them up... by the latin name ha ha)
But it says it likes well draining soil with full sun for blooming.
It's got the well draining soil and almost no sun!

Tomorrow I will prepare a couple of areas to transplant some of them, where they might like it and get enough sun. And then we will see!!

It'd be rather funny if they are Naked Ladies... Because my husband was so adamant that I be careful with them when I started moving them around last spring. :roll: I remember him saying, "Those are bulbs! Be careful with the bulbs!" ha ha
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Mr_bobo_
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Re: A bunch of new plants found in the woods

I stop by to solve mystery of number 5

...it is: Ornithogalum umbellatum
Familia: Asparagaceae


...so it is not related with onion... hehe
:cool:
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