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Gary350
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Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

Almost a FREE Green House 27 ft long.

I put an ad on Craigslist looking for free glass, patio doors, old windows, fish aquariums, flat glass, mirrors, etc. to make hot beds in my garden. I struck gold today I got 25 free aluminum windows from a double wide trailer home. All I need to do now is buy about 20 pressure treated 2x4 boards to frame a green house then put the windows on with screws. I have enough windows to build it 27 ft long by 6 ft wide or about 14" x 12". This will be great for growing a winter garden and also growing my own plants from seeds in the spring. I am going to put it together with screws so if I move I can take it apart and take it with me. I have a wall fan and thermostate all I need is 2 Louves. All the windows open so I can let out the heat in summer. I hope this inspires someone else to put an ad on craigslist too.

[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h292/mikeweaver/Green1.jpg[/img]

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soil
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Location: N. California

we built our greenhouse out of used old doors that are 90% window. works great!

my advice would be to put a number of the panels on hinges so in the summer you can open all of them and let cool air in.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

thanrose
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Location: Jacksonville, FLZone 9A

Great score, Gary! Congratulations.

Soil, do most of your doors function as doors/shutters? I guess I'm asking if you have the frames for them, too.

I've seen some online pics of shabby chic dollhouse-style green houses made with a combination of doors and windows of multiple types, with a very small amount of wood or siding of some sort to accommodate the odd geometry. On larger structures such as Gary's it might become more of a problem to open each aperture a different way for venting.

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soil
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i think 10 out of the 30 doors we used open on hinges. cant rememeber for sure, but it works great in the summer, lets a nice cool breeze through, and i put shade cloth on top. turns my winter greenhouse into a summer shade house.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

greenstubbs
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Location: N. Nevada

Nice score, but as I say to all that have done this. This topic is worthless without pics!!!!!

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Are you looking for ideas to build one yourself greenstubs? Or do you have one already? (share? :wink:) Gary350's project sounds great! Looking forward to hearing more as it develops. 8)

b_kind2animals
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Location: Chicago area

As a former glazer

A wee bit of advise if any of the windows consist of insulating units. Referred to by many as Thermopane, these are two sheets of glass (typically) with a seal around the edge:

If any have a fogged look that doesn't wash off, the seal is compromised and allowing moisture in. In time, the fogging will worsen and while there is still a fair amount of transmission of light, the aesthetics is degraded. There is no repair option, but new custom sized replacements units are available. That defeats the low cost aim, I know, but I'm just sayin'...

Also, if you have any bare units (i.e. not in a frame), be sure to support both panes equally, preferably on setting blocks made for that type of unit.

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Gary350
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Re: As a former glazer

b_kind2animals wrote:A wee bit of advise if any of the windows consist of insulating units. Referred to by many as Thermopane, these are two sheets of glass (typically) with a seal around the edge:

If any have a fogged look that doesn't wash off, the seal is compromised and allowing moisture in. In time, the fogging will worsen and while there is still a fair amount of transmission of light, the aesthetics is degraded. There is no repair option, but new custom sized replacements units are available. That defeats the low cost aim, I know, but I'm just sayin'...

Also, if you have any bare units (i.e. not in a frame), be sure to support both panes equally, preferably on setting blocks made for that type of unit.
The fog or frosty problem on the surface of the glass is self etching. It can not be repaired easy but there is an old photography trick that will fix the problem. Wipe the glass with vaseline it fills in the etching then wipe it off now the etching appears to be gone. This will last for several months. This also works on a car window. The front window gets tiny little micro size scratches at night light reflects off the scratches and makes it hard to see also sun reflects off the scratches too wipe your window with vaseline then wipe it off now you can see at night the on coming car lights no longer produce a hase on the window.

thanrose
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Yeah, that's a useful trick.

I think b_kind_2_animals was talking about thermal paned windows that have two or sometimes three panes sandwiched in a frame together, sealed so there is no air leakage.

Years ago, my brother threw me against a triple paned, triple paneled slider. Humidity seeped in, hazed the glass year round on the panel I hit. Costly fix, probably not worth the beer mug I slammed against his head. Ah, kids.

I don't think this will be much of a problem for your greenhouse. Sometimes a little light refraction is a good thing in a greenhouse.

b_kind2animals
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Re: As a former glazer

Gary350 wrote: The fog or frosty problem on the surface of the glass is self etching.
That is correct. The moisture etches the glass. The problem as it relates to insulating units is that the etching takes place on the inside surfaces. I.e. the very surfaces that you can't access w/o taking the unit apart.

It is possible to split them apart with a utility knife and a bit of struggle. I knew a coworker who did just that to make his own aquariums. If he took care to make sure the etched surface was used as the inner sides of the aquarium, when the tank was filled w/ water, it was like the glass was brand new.

garden5
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Location: ohio

Great find, Gary.

I agree that Craig's List is a great place to find just about anything you are looking for. This is especially true if you are looking for free things that other folks are throwing away.

Great tip about the Vaseline on the glass, as well, I'll have to remember that one. Does the rain wash it off? What about the wipers on your car winshield?
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