minnesota_girl
Senior Member
Posts: 155
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 8:29 pm
Location: Minnesota

Coral Bells

Okay, i just bought some coral bells at a nursery (50% off I love getting good deals) and I just fell in love with them, this particular variety is part sun. I was wondering if anybody had some tips on growing this perennial? or just some info from somebody who's grown them.
Happy Gardening

Garden Spider
Cool Member
Posts: 88
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2008 4:07 pm
Location: Western Washington

I love Coral Bells (Heuchera). They are very hardy, tough plants that not only survive but thrive on very little care. They also attract butterflied and hummingbirds.

They are drought tolerant when established, needing a deep watering only once a week or so during prolonged dry spells, and will go longer, if necessary. I've had Heucheras that looked all dried up and crispy, only to revive when given water.

Generally, the dark green and purple-leaved varieties are more sun tolerant, preferring full sun. The chartreuse, golden, and silver leaved varieties do better in part sun. In parts of the midwest, SW, and SE, where it's very hot, I think they would all need some sun protection, but Minnesota is pretty far north, I think the general guidelines I gave will work. I have some Key Lime Pie on the north side of the house, where they are in shade until about 1 or 2 pm . . . it's not the greatest place for them, I think they'd be happier with several hours of morning sun instead, but they are growing and blooming, though remaining smaller than their purple-leaved neighbors.

I think you will enjoy your new Coral Bells--they are wonderful little plants!
Barb and the Two Furry Speedbumps

minnesota_girl
Senior Member
Posts: 155
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 8:29 pm
Location: Minnesota

Thanks for the tips. They are so gorgeous! I love them. :D
Happy Gardening

MaineDesigner
Green Thumb
Posts: 439
Joined: Thu Nov 09, 2006 4:17 pm
Location: Midcoast Maine, Zone 5b

Heuchera are nice plants. There have have been a huge number of new introductions in the last four or five years as a result of tissue culturing. Unfortunately, a significant percentage of the these newer cultivars are not garden worthy, lacking vigor and winter hardiness. I think they are being rushed from the labs into mass production without proper trialing.

This is a broad generalization but I've generally had the best luck either with high, dappled shade or full sun in the AM going into shade around 2:00PM but I've seen them succeed in everything from moderate shade to full sun depending on the cultivar, moisture availability and soils. Nursery tags are notoriously inaccurate but Minnesota has some excellent small nurseries where you should be able to get good culture information.

minnesota_girl
Senior Member
Posts: 155
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 8:29 pm
Location: Minnesota

Trust me where I live I always check winter hardiness before I bring it home. I try to get thing that are at least a 3 but I am actually a 4 so they tell me anyway. (I am kind of on the border). I suppose in Maine you guys have pretty good winters, too. :)

Solveig
Cool Member
Posts: 69
Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2008 5:55 pm
Location: Finland

I also like Heucheras very much and they survive quite well here in our conditions, that respond to about US zone 3. Some new introductions, especially those with light brown/yellow leaves, tend to be less winterhardy.

Return to “Perennials”