stvfarmboy
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Location: Ames, IA; Hardiness Zone 5

Perennial Vines

I have a question on what type of perennial vine I might be able to grow or what recommendations any of you might have. I have a patio area in my backyard and I would like to grow some vines on the one side of it. They would be facing east and are in a rather shady area. I live in Hardiness Zone 5. Here are a couple pictures of what I have. The first is of the patio area and the second is angling up to show the tree. Since it doesn't have leaves yet I know know how well it portrays the fact that the patio is in shade.



[img]https://i299.photobucket.com/albums/mm292/stvfarmboy/House/Patio.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i299.photobucket.com/albums/mm292/stvfarmboy/House/Patioshade.jpg[/img]

Let me know any questions you have or if something isn't clear and any suggestions anyone might have for a vine that would do well in that area is appreciated.

Thanks.
Last edited by stvfarmboy on Thu Jul 08, 2010 2:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

opabinia51
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First of all it's just gorgeous so congratulations on that. Welcome to the Helpful Gardener!

Well, perennial vines... I like the Passion flower but, they can take a while to fill in. The flowers are even edible if you want to throw them into a salad.

Looks like you could potentially get a lot of sun in that spot so grapes could be an option. However, grapes tend to be a lot of work too. You have to prune the canes back each winter (or fall). So, that might not be what you are looking for.

Clematis is really nice and grows like a weed.

This isn't a vine but, if you have sufficient light there you could espalier a peach tree at the spot as well.

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Quietly Awesome
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Sweet Autumn Clem. would work. Grows fast. Blooms in fall. Tiny, white, fragrant flowers. I LOVE mine! :D

opabinia51
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Clem being short for Clematis? They are wonderful aren't they?

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Gnome
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stvfarmboy,

One possible choice for your shady location would be Virginia Creeper, Parthenocissus quinquefolia It is a deciduous vine that does well in part shade and has good fall color. This plant can be invasive and will spread on the ground but if you manage it vertically it is not too dificult to contain.
[img]https://faculty.etsu.edu/mcdowelt/images%20used%202001%5Cparthenocissus.JPG[/img]
[img]https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/db/Parthenocissus_quinquefolia.jpg/800px-Parthenocissus_quinquefolia.jpg[/img]

Another choice for a shady spot would be Bittersweet, Celastrus scandens. This plant is also a deciduous climber and also puts on a nice show of color in the fall but in this case it is the fruit.
[img]https://www.botanypictures.com/plantimages/celastrus%20scandens%2001%20(boomwurger).jpg[/img]
[img]https://www.vanbelle.com/images/plant%20guide/vines/celastrus-diana.jpg[/img]
This plant has some issues as well. It requires both male and female plants to flower and only the female will. There is also a similar species, Oriental Bittersweet, Celastrus orbiculatus that is a very invasive non-native species to be avoided.

Norm

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NEWisc
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Location: WI z4

Another vine that will take part shade and is often overlooked is Dutchman's Pipe (Aristolochia macrophylla) and (A. tomentosa):

https://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/plant.asp?code=J410

https://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/plant.asp?code=W820

The flowers are unique, although somewhat inconspicuous; but it's foliage is interesting. It's also the host plant for the Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly:

https://www.wisconsinbutterflies.org/butterflies/species/100
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stvfarmboy
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Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2008 11:44 pm
Location: Ames, IA; Hardiness Zone 5

Thanks for all of the suggestions and let me know of any others that you can think of. I'll have to look up some of these you all mentioned to see what I like best. Maybe I'll do a different vine on each of the three posts or something.

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NEWisc
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One more that comes to mind is American Wisteria (Wisteria frutescens):

https://www.bbg.org/mem/signature/2008/t24.html
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Age is a biological fact.
Old is a state of mind.
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MaineDesigner
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I'm going to cast my vote with NE Wisc's suggestion of Aristolochia but let me offer some caveats and observations. I used to work a couple hundred miles north of you in Minnesota and western Wisconsin so I'm familiar with the region. While there I worked with Humulus (hops), Clematis spp., Actinidia (hardy kiwi), Parthenocissus (Virginia Creeper), Vitis (grapes), Wisteria macrostachys & W. frutescens, Campsis radicans (Trumpet vine), Lonicera x brownii (Honeysuckle), and Akebia. For many of these if I never encounter them again it will be fine with me. Most vines, given favorable growing conditions, have decidely imperialistic ambitions.
Aristolochia is fast growing and will produce a nearly opaque screen but in moderate shade (where many vines are decidedly unhappy) it is not excessively aggressive. The big plus from my perspective, and as has been noted, is that it is the preferred food source for the caterpillars of Battus philenor the Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly. How do you feel about caterpillars munching on your vines? The biggest downsides of Dutchman's Pipe are that the flowers aren't very showy (usually hidden in the foliage) and it doesn't produce any significant fall color.
Virginia Creeper, by contrast, is a very showy red in the fall but it is also much more of a thug than Dutchman's Pipe in my experience. Don't plant it unless you are game for a fight.
Clematis ternifolia, , Sweet-autumn Clematis, is very showy when in bloom in late summer/early fall. I have only grown it in nearly full sun so I really don't know how it responds in part shade. In warmer climates it is considered an invasive exotic but the cold winters in Ames should restrain its imperial ambitions.
I do not think you will find Passion Flower to be hardy in Iowa.
Wisteria macrostachys 'Aunt Dee' is the hardiest Wisteria in my experience but it really prefers full sun. Wisteria futescens 'Amethyst Falls' was slightly less hardy but might be okay for you. Again it really prefers full sun.

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JPlovesflowers
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Location: Northwest Arkansas

Perennial Vine

I would suggest Carolina Jasmine. They grow fast and produce a wonderful bloom in the fall. I am going to try the berry vine that someone suggested to you, it looks beautiful and I am always looking for some fall/winter color. You may also want to anchor with a couple of one variety and then interplant with another variety so that you get different bloom times. I've grown two different clematis side by side on the same trellis to get extended bloom times. and I've grown climbing roses with annual vines on top of them for continuous bloom. You have lots of options. Watch out for the wisteria. It can eventually destroy your structure if it is not super strong (at least 6x6). Also, the Virginia Creeper is quite invasive, once you have it, it is just about impossible to get rid of. Good luck! :D

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