cynthia_h
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7501
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 11:02 pm
Location: El Cerrito, CA

It depends. The "morning glory" seeds I've seen in the commercial packets and whose descriptions I've read are all of the genus Ipomoea (e.g., Ipomoea tricolor, "Morning glory").

However, Convolvulus althaeoides tenuissimus (no common name provided in Sunset's Western Garden Book) earns the comment, "Spreds by rhizomes and can be invasive. Good in rock gardens, hanging baskets." And "tenuissimus" means "the most tenacious." Hmmm...

In the introductory paragraph for Convulvulus spp., Sunset states, "Common vining morning glories (Ipomoea) are sometimes sold as Convovulus."

I would go back and read the descriptions of what you planted (seed envelopes, maybe?). Most likely, if it was from seed, it was the nice, only mildly "vigorous" Ipomoea.

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

yer mom
Newly Registered
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 4:17 am
Location: Eureka CA

morning glories

Thanks Cynthia,

I have 6 varieties started inside my house on the north coast of CA - Pastel Star, Scarlet O'Hara, Heavenly Blue, Candy Pink, Star of Yelta and my favorite - Picotee Blue. (If you have never seen it, google the image it is amazing!)

Not sure all are of the genus Ipomoea as only one seed packet indicates that. The others do not specify. If they are then they sound a little more well mannered than the nightmares I have been reading about.

Do you know if any of these can hurt established trees?

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cynthia_h
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7501
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 11:02 pm
Location: El Cerrito, CA

Very beautiful. It's an Ipomoea, too. You'll be able to check the others via the Internet as well. I entered - "Picotee Blue" morning glory - as my search phrase, and one of the sites gave genus and species.

All of these belong to the Family Convulvaceae, but it's the genus Convolvulus that you want to look out for.

Sounds like you'll have quite a display! :)

Did you plant them at the base of some trees? Is that why you're asking re. trees? Or do you fear that they might rob tree roots of water? (I'm not clear on the "can they hurt established trees" question.)

Cynthia

yer mom
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Posts: 5
Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 4:17 am
Location: Eureka CA

Planting morning glories

Yes I do want to plant them at the base of a formal looking 12' shrubby cypress(?) tree that is about 5 ft wide and goes to a sharp point at the top. I would like to try them on blackberries and a chain link fence that has an unfortunate view as well. I am also planning to train them on a wooden fence on fishing line. I have always wanted to grow morning glories but never have. Now I have at least 100 starts. I will plant some and gift or trade others. Thanks so much for your insight! :D

yer mom
Newly Registered
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 4:17 am
Location: Eureka CA

morning glory

ooops... forgot to answer your question. I was afraid they may choke out trees and partially disfigure them. :?:

cynthia_h
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7501
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 11:02 pm
Location: El Cerrito, CA

The stand of morning glories we had in Berkeley had been planted before we moved there, in and among volunteer blackberries. Both plants flourished (of course...).

They were supported by a very old wooden fence whose existence was inferred only; the fence wasn't visible under the combination of these plants and the English ivy.

I would *not* recommend planting morning glories at the base of a tree unless you want the tree to be completely covered by the flowers. Morning glories twine very tightly to their supports; I've seen some landscaping near I-80 through Berkeley and Albany overgrown by (admittedly beautiful) morning glories. They die back during the dry Bay Area summer, but they re-appear with every rainy season.

Cynthia

GRDrip
Full Member
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 3:28 am
Location: Southern Indiana

When I first started out gardening, I grabbed some bindweed out of a field because I thought it was pretty. It does indeed grow deep taproots that breakoff when you pull them. These taproots double (at least) in number, so now I contended with really thick vines and many, many seeds that sprouted the next spring. I am still pulling it out of my bed - it may grow several inches overnight. It seems impossible to kill.
There aren't many flowers on it (but they are pretty) and I don't believe I've ever seen a butterfly on one.
I'm not gung-ho on invasives (yet), but trust me on this - it is not one you want to start messing with. I'd get a clematis.

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biwa
Senior Member
Posts: 203
Joined: Sun Aug 13, 2006 8:15 am
Location: Virginia, zone 7

I agree that ipomoea grows quickly and spreads if not checked, but it's hardly something you're going to battle with to try and control. They rip out of the ground easily for me, and they don't come back until the new seeds germinate the following spring. They grow as annuals where I live.

I think they're far less invasive than English ivy, poison ivy, Japanese honeysuckle, and Virginia creeper. Ipomoea is about the same level of invasiveness as wild grape vines (muscadine I think they're called?)

Perhaps you live in a warmer place than me; then I could see them being a problem. Ipomoea is not well adapted to my area; it's kind of wussy about the cold and the seeds don't even germinate until very late in the spring. And of course it dies completely when winter comes.

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