jackbonbon
Newly Registered
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Nov 17, 2012 11:54 am
Location: Tunisia

[question] what are the plants that could grow in february?

Hello. first of all i apologize if this is in the wrong section but my english is not very goodand i can't realy understand all the section.
so it will be my girlfriend's birthday on february, 4th and as a gift i would like to give her a plant, something that gives a flower eventually. i want to plant the plant and give it to my girlfriend so that she takes care of it.
so is there a plant that could be planted these days and that can grow by late february or begining of march?
Thank you! :D

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

Welcome to the Forum! Glad you found us!

Not a question that anyone could answer, without knowing the climate in Tunisia and what the weather/ temperatures will be like in February...
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

jackbonbon
Newly Registered
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Nov 17, 2012 11:54 am
Location: Tunisia

i thank you very much for your answer.
but i am talking about an indoor plant, something that can be planted in a pot like a single flower or something like it! something that isn't tightly related to the weather.
thank you. :)

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27733
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Oh dear. We're not holding back on you. I was also waiting for your reply.

It really helps to provide as much info as possible -- then we can make an informed recommendation.

"Indoor" is a significant factor. But now we also need to knw the kind of temperature and sunlight exposure you and your gf can provide.

Do you expect this to be a bloom once and die, bloom for several month and die, bloom for several month and grow every year to bloom again, or bloom once per year but regrow each year to bloom again? Do you need to be able to keep it indoors 100% of the time? Can you/gf give it outdoor vacation time part of the year?

User avatar
pinksand
Greener Thumb
Posts: 870
Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2012 6:13 am
Location: Columbia, MD

Aha, that makes more sense now! Applestar asked some excellent questions.
Size may also be an issue... were you thinking something small that could sit on a table or desk or were you thinking something bigger?

If you're looking for small, I'd highly recommend an African violet. They're low maintenance and prolific bloomers under the right conditions. Mine come in and out of bloom throughout the year. They prefer diffused light so they aren't terribly picky.

Another fun small flowering plant is a guppy/goldfish plant (Nematanthus spp.) I find that mine flowers more in a brighter window. The flowers are a unique shape, but they aren't quite as showy as the African violets.

Orchids are quite gorgeous when in bloom, but can be quite fickle about their environment.

I guess there are a lot of dependent factors, light, size, maintenance, etc.
USDA Zone 7a, Sunset Zone 32
"The earth laughs in flowers" -Ralph Waldo Emerson

jackbonbon
Newly Registered
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Nov 17, 2012 11:54 am
Location: Tunisia

applestar wrote:Oh dear. We're not holding back on you. I was also waiting for your reply.

It really helps to provide as much info as possible -- then we can make an informed recommendation.

"Indoor" is a significant factor. But now we also need to knw the kind of temperature and sunlight exposure you and your gf can provide.

Do you expect this to be a bloom once and die, bloom for several month and die, bloom for several month and grow every year to bloom again, or bloom once per year but regrow each year to bloom again? Do you need to be able to keep it indoors 100% of the time? Can you/gf give it outdoor vacation time part of the year?
first of all i would like to thank you for your answer.
i would have provided more information if i knew what i am talking about but it all slipped my mind. i just thought that i just plant the plant and water it and that's it! but thank you for reminding me of these important factors!
so in answer to your questions it is preferable that the plant bloom once and die because i don't think my gf will like taking care of a plant for a long time. and concerning the outdoor "vacation" it would be possible to either leave the pot of the plant outside in the sun for a momentary sunbath or it could be kept indoors at all times.
so what are your suggestions for a beginner? :D

jackbonbon
Newly Registered
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Nov 17, 2012 11:54 am
Location: Tunisia

pinksand wrote:Aha, that makes more sense now! Applestar asked some excellent questions.
Size may also be an issue... were you thinking something small that could sit on a table or desk or were you thinking something bigger?

If you're looking for small, I'd highly recommend an African violet. They're low maintenance and prolific bloomers under the right conditions. Mine come in and out of bloom throughout the year. They prefer diffused light so they aren't terribly picky.

Another fun small flowering plant is a guppy/goldfish plant (Nematanthus spp.) I find that mine flowers more in a brighter window. The flowers are a unique shape, but they aren't quite as showy as the African violets.

Orchids are quite gorgeous when in bloom, but can be quite fickle about their environment.

I guess there are a lot of dependent factors, light, size, maintenance, etc.
thank you! i like the african violet idea i am going to try and look for it!
i also liked the shape of the guppy plant you mentioned! and i like orchids too but they're maybe difficult to take care of. i am going to try to find these plants either in the local market or in a supermarket.
thank you.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27733
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Sounds good. I agree African violets are generally easy to care for. As long as they are not overwatered or allowed to sit in excess water and don't put in hot sun and they are pretty hard to kill. Moderate fertilizer is sufficient to have them repeat bloom after a few months rest. They are available in large selection of colors and bloom styles.

Phalaenopsis - moth orchid - is also relatively easy to care for.

For my reply, I think the absolutely simplest to care for "bloom *beautifully* and die" type gift plants are flowering bulbs.

Again, the selection would depend on your location. For example, in North America at this time of the year -- heading into winter -- African Amaryllis is available in wide selection of colors, sizes, and bloom styles (large, small, double, frilly). paper White Narcissus are also often given and are easy and are fragrant. For spring bloom, hyacinths, tulips, daffodils, and grape hyacinth. Available as ready to gift, pre-planted in potting mix kits, they only need to be given a sunny location and watered occasionally. They are also available as grow-in-gravel-and-water kits. Generally speaking, only ways they fail are insufficient light.

With this type of blooming bulbs, it's just a question of starting them to bloom when you want them to. They bloom once and that's it. Although dedicated gardeners can bring them back to life year to year, they are generally considered disposable gift plants.

FWIW, another easy to care for (i.e. not easily killed) plant that is beautiful in bloom is Easter/Thanksgiving/Christmas cactus. For February bloom, I think "Easter" cactus might be available. There is a trick to getting them to rebloom, but the plant itself is easy to care for. The one I have is "Thanksgiving" cactus and it reblooms every year at this time of the year.

There are many flowering plants that are often given without thought to how difficult it is to maintain them. I think giving inexperienced gardeners difficult plants can have the effect of making the recipient feel guilty or inadequate for not being able to keep them alive/letting them die. But unfortunately the industry is such that they SELL plants that are not always suitable and end up dying soon after being gifted.

jackbonbon
Newly Registered
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Nov 17, 2012 11:54 am
Location: Tunisia

I am very grateful for that helpful reply applestar. I got today some tulips from a local merchant and i am going to plant one in a pot later this week.
i asked the same merchant for an african tulip he refered me to a supermarket. i will get them later. i decided to plant several plants in several pots and try and take care of them and give the best one to my gf!
im gonna try tulips ,african violets and maybe a cactus!
thank you all for your support and i might need some help later so i would post other questions.
god bless you all and thank you!

Return to “Perennials”