Matthew.Carman
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I have a Monarda thats struggling and I used plant start fertilizer to help it grow. (just the one time) Was this a mistake? The Monarda was just recently planted in a bed with Monarda I planted last year and the other Monarda are doing fine so this one should be fine but the foilage does not look very good.

I did not know fertilizer on a stressed plant was a bad idea.

Ps. Utakecare, Geraniums are popular here to but I always thought they were only annuals which is why I never thought about purchasing one.
There can be miracles when you believe - Prince of Egypt.

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Matthew.Carman
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cynthia_h wrote:
Matthew.Carman wrote: I did not know fertilizer on a stressed plant was a bad idea.
1) Re. fertilizer: The fertilizer will stimulate new growth in the upper structure of the plant without any regard as to whether the roots or vascular system can actually support that new growth. This can lead to the death of the plant from the imbalance.

Cynthia
I bought plant star fertilizer that stimulates root growth. I determined my Monarda which is stressed has powdery mildew and the foilage is going to be trimmed down. I hope that does not hurt the plant but I can't let the mildew spread to my other flowers.
There can be miracles when you believe - Prince of Egypt.

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rainbowgardener
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Monarda is one of the things that is really susceptible to powdery mildew, though mine doesn't usually start showing it until mid-summer or so. You can try the milk solution for it (type that into Search the Forum keyword box), but it works best preventatively or if you catch it very early. I haven't found it very effective on a severe case.
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Matthew.Carman
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Thanks Rainbow. I cut off the tops of the stems to allow them to air out and removed the sick looking leaves and then I added plant start fertilizer. I don't know if it's podery wildew but the leaves were turning grey and curling up. This was a nursery bought plant and it was planted in good soil. I am hoping it comes back but I have other plants there that will cover the area if it does not make it. It has enough space but maybe it still felt over crowded.
There can be miracles when you believe - Prince of Egypt.

Can you risk everything for the chance of being alone? -Never let go, Bryan Adams.

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rainbowgardener
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Here's a picture of what a fairly advanced case of powdery mildew looks like:

https://victoryhydro.com/powdery-mildew-got-you-down-we-have-just-what-you-need

that is a zucchini which is another of the susceptible plants.

It is greyish white and powdery, but doesn't typically curl the leaves.
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

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applestar
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They root easily from cuttings so if you have some healthy stems, try rooting some. I would clean the stems first in case there are any spores on them.

Matthew.Carman
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Thats not what my Monarda had. It was just shriviling up and the foilage was turning grey. I removed the leaves and gave it plant start since it was just recently established. I have been watering it plenty so that's not the problem.
There can be miracles when you believe - Prince of Egypt.

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applestar
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Well, your saying "the leaves turned grey" still makes me think they had powdery mildew.... "watering plenty" could make them more susceptible.

Yellowing leaves starting from the ground, grey shriveling, and fuzzy appearance in the stems turning brown and grey....

I usually don't fertilize ailing plants unless there are obvious reasons to think they need nutrients. I don't use chemical "plant starts" -- preferring organic biological boosters like kelp, liquid kelp, AACT, etc.

Matthew.Carman
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Applestar I don't like chemical fertilizer but I used it just once to give my new plants a boost. It will go to my neighbors.

The Monarda is coming back nicely now that I removed the leaves. It has a bunch of new leaves coming up. Thanks for the help.
There can be miracles when you believe - Prince of Egypt.

Can you risk everything for the chance of being alone? -Never let go, Bryan Adams.

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Runningtrails
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Monarda is one of the hardiest plants in my garden. Nothing kills it. I'm sure it will come back and do well. I have to pull it out to keep it from taking over and I just ignore it completely.

There are many different types of powdery mildew and they are usually plant specific. The one that grows on monarda and other types of mint, is most likely not going to spread to your other perennials.

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