Elen
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 6:11 pm
Location: Canada

Non-blooming Daylilies

Hello everyone - new here to the forum, and I need some suggestions please.

About 3 seasons ago I purchased 2 daylily plants and put them in my front garden which has a west exposure. The late afternoon sun is VERY hot there so I needed plants that could withstand this.

The foliage of the plants is very lovely and the plants are doing well, but sadly they have yet to bloom. As mentioned, this will be the third season.

I am in Calgary, Alberta Canada, and a zone 3.

Any suggestions? I'm at wits end and to be honest, I really want to rip them out! :x

Thank you! :)
Elen

User avatar
Kisal
Mod Emeritus
Posts: 7648
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:04 am
Location: Oregon

Hmmmm ... I don't think the heat is the problem. I have daylilies in the southwest part of my yard. They're in full sun from dawn until dusk. They're the old-fashioned orange ones, along with some yellow Stella d'Oros. They bloom very nicely for me, despite the fact that I neglect them horribly. I barely even water them during the summer. :oops:

Often, plants fail to bloom if they are given a fertilizer that contains too much nitrogen. If you fertilize yours, you may want to check the NPK numbers on the container. I don't fertilize mine at all.

It's possible that they might have been planted too deeply. Here is a video about [url=https://fr.truveo.com/Gardening-How-To-Plant-Daylilies/id/380640460]how to plant daylilies[/url].
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

daylily hardiness

Zone 3 is a fairly harsh evironment. Daylily varieties are quite variable re cold-hardiness. Some are hardy clear down to zone 2 and some are definitely not. If the winter is pretty tough for the variety you have, even though it is surviving, it could set them back for blooming.

Since day lilies go dormant and winter under the ground, it isn't the air temperature that matters so much, but what is going on in the soil. Soil moisture, frost heaving, mulching, snow cover, wind and other factors that affect the soil are more likely to affect how well they do. If you haven't already, this fall I would try giving them a very heavy mulch, to protect them against frost heaving, etc. Then once it starts warming up in spring you will have to pull some of that away to give them a chance to warm up.

Elen
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 6:11 pm
Location: Canada

Thank you - I will try both suggestions. Hopefully something good will transpire! :D
Elen

Return to “Perennials”