stepdancemom
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We sprayed entire landscape plants with brush killer HELP!!

I just want to cry last week we spayed all our hostas, wisterias, annuals. azelas and other perrenails with Bayer advanced brush killer it was next to a insectide killer same color bottle. We only used 2 tbs versus the 1/2 cup as it suggests. It was the concentrED VERSIONS. What are our chances of loosing everything? Should we cut back the wisteria i see its starting to wilt. Any input would be helpful. iF THEY DO DIE NOW ANY CHANCES OF IT COMING BACK NEXT YEAR? Please....

Lisa in pa

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Kisal
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I'm so sorry to hear that! I imagine you have killed all your plants. :shock:

If you had just done it a few minutes ago, you might have been able to salvage some of them by washing them off with a hose. As it is, the brush killer has had plenty of time to be absorbed by the plant and do its work. If the stuff is any good as a brush killer, then I don't think your plants will survive. :(

I don't mean to take you to task in regard to this error, but for the sake of any new gardeners who read this, I just cannot overstress how absolutely critical it is to read labels whenever you use any kind of chemical, whether it's in your garden or for any other purpose. In fact, the labels should be read and re-read 3 or more times before the container is even opened, just to be sure nothing has been missed.

I'm so sorry! :(

stepdancemom
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Thanks fo the reply. My husband said he just misted the plants with Bayer Advanced with a very mild solution mix. How long before we will be able to see what will survive?

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Kisal
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Probably not until later in the year, at the very earliest. For some of the plants, you may not know until next spring.

One other problem that might occur is, if some of the plants do survive and put out new growth late this year, the new growth will be killed during the winter, because it won't have time to harden off. Depending on how much damage has been done to the roots, they may or may not make it through the winter.

Brush killer works by being absorbed through the leaves and bark of a plant. Then it works its way down into the roots, and kills them, as well. Since the upper parts of the plants have wilted, it indicates that the brush killer has been absorbed and caused some root damage.

I am not familiar with that brand of brush killer, so I don't know how well it works. I have had blackberries, which are particularly difficult to kill, survive treatment with some brush killers.

I'm pretty certain that you may as well replace your annuals. Be sure to read the label on the brush killer container, to see what it says about how soon you can replant. Some chemical treatments leave residue in the soil for a longer time than others.

Wisteria, I think is pretty tough, and very well may survive the spraying.

Azaleas can be damaged fairly easily by chemicals. I can't predict how likely it is that they'll survive.

What kind of perennials were sprayed? Some are pretty tough, while others are more delicate.

Again, I'm so sorry that you have to deal with such a sad occurence. :(

stepdancemom
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The other perrenials we had were huge elephant ears hostas, seedum, butterfly bush and a bunch of hemlocks. Oh God ...this is so sad.

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Kisal
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It really is a heartbreaker, Stepdancemom, and my heart goes out to you! I can only imagine how awful you must feel! :(

valleytreeman
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Worth a try

I don't know how long its been now, but on your herbacious plants such as the elephant ears and hosta, you can cut off all the foiliage in hopes of preventing the translocation of the chemical down to the roots. Most of the herbacious plants will releaf if the roots are intact. I'm not sure what the "active" is in the Bayer product. Depending upon the active ingredient, activity may be nearly immeadiate or delayed a week to 10 days.
hey its me!

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Trish-A
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I did something similar about 40 years ago. All I can say is water, feed and water and hold you breath till next year. In my case two fruit trees still grew, but stopped producing and about half the established bushes, roses and perennials died off. :(

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