missygirl
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2008 11:55 pm
Location: Western PA

Is it too long since these daylillies were dug up?

Hi! Someone just gave me a bunch of orange daylillies (sometimes called roadside lillies) that were dug up about a week ago. Of course, in this area they are done for the year and the foliage has died and dried up and was pretty much cut off, so we're talking just the big clumps of the bulbs. Have they been out of the ground for too long? There isn't much dirt left around them and they are just in boxes. There are alot of them and I'm going to share them with a couple of my friends, but I want to make sure that they aren't ruined by having them out of the ground for this long. It may be a few more days before I can get them delivered and then into the ground. Thanks for any advice!

Trish-A
Full Member
Posts: 48
Joined: Thu Oct 23, 2008 6:23 pm
Location: SW PA - Zone 6a

You should be able to put them in the ground now. Plant about 4 to six inches deep.
When we bought this house 9 years ago I planted mine in February with several inches of snow on the ground and they are doing just fine.
If these are the orange "Roadside Lillie's" pick a spot where they will be allowed to spread.

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applestar
Mod
Posts: 28026
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Are you planning to eat them next year? :D
https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=171021
All parts of the daylily (Hemerocallis sp.) are edible. Flowers can be chopped into green salads, eaten as a garnish, or deep-fried.
https://www.waysidegardensvoices.com/2007/05/edible_daylilie.html
All cultivated varieties of daylily are edible.
Flowers and flower buds of daylilies are delicious and quickly prepared for eating. The flowers are used in soups, meat dishes, and with noodles. Prepare the flowers for eating by removing the basal end (ovary) and dicing the rest. Flowers can be used for garnishing foods in somewhat the same way as mushrooms are employed. These flowers add substance, color, and pleasing flavors to foods. Fresh flowers are best for eating since some flavors are altered when they are preserved by drying and freezing.
This summer, I took a mixed non-traditional salad to a playdate. 8) It included daylily flowers, prickly pear cactus flowers, nasturtium flowers, johnny jump-up flowers, as well as purslane, wood sorrel, plantain, and lambs quarters, among others. It was a great hit with the kids. :wink:

p.s. The tubers are supposed to be edible too though I've never tried them my self. You can find recipes on-line.

petalfuzz
Green Thumb
Posts: 632
Joined: Sat May 31, 2008 7:37 pm

If you are really worried about them, I'd just soak them for an hour or two in a bucket of water before planting and give them a thorough watering after planting. But I've heard "ditch lilies" are super hardy and hard hard hard to kill, so I'm betting they'll be just fine! Enjoy them!

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