garden4fun
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Another Mystery Perennial-Please help identify

A friend took a picture of the following. it is the pink flower in the front of the photo. i live in Maine zone 5 it was taken about 4 weeks ago. I keep waivering that it is a late blooming peony, or maybe a poppy(by the seed pod). I did notice that it is between rocks thinking it must be perennial and have reseeded there. I just think this is so lovely and would love to duplicate it in my garden.
Thanks in advance!!

:D

[img]https://img389.imageshack.us/img389/3176/mysteryflower6kf.th.jpg[/img]

grandpasrose
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I have tried to open your photo, but am told I am forbidden from that site. Is there some kind of lock on it? :?
VAL
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

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Hey Val,
I fixed it for ya'.
;)

grandpasrose
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Thanks so much Roger - don't know what I'd do without you! :D
VAL
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

grandpasrose
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Hello Gardenin 4 fun! Definitely not a peony, but that is about the best I can tell you from the picture you have sent. It is so small that the detail is not very clear. Zooming in just makes it blurry. If you can try a larger photo, closer in to the plant, there would be a better chance of identifying it. The folks around here usually do identify the mysteries eventually, so give it a try! :wink:
VAL
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

garden4fun
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Lets try this one.

Ok Val so maybe not a peony. What about some kind of late poppy. The foliage is so not poppy. See the folded over bud in the front of the photo looks like poppy. Ughhhh this stuff makes me crazy!
Thanks!!!
Kim
Kim P.
Gardening requires lots of water - most of it in the form of perspiration. ~Lou Erickson

garden4fun
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Oh I forgot the pic....LOL

https://img377.imageshack.us/my.php?image=img38190bf.jpg
Kim P.
Gardening requires lots of water - most of it in the form of perspiration. ~Lou Erickson

grandpasrose
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Hi there Kim! It's not so bad - it's fun! :lol:
You actually have a "papaver Somniferum" and the cultivar is Bombast Rose. It is otherwise known as Peony Poppy, Opium Poppy or Paeony Flowered Poppy, but the variety of your particular one is Bombast Rose.

You can save the seed from this plant and begin more plants for your garden. Don't pick the seed pod before it is ripe though. What I suggest, to prevent the pod ripening and bursting open on you before you can catch it, is loosely tie a light paper bag over it. Put a couple of small holes in the bag so that it can breath. Don't use plastic as it will get too damp, and your pod will likely rot. This way, if your pod does burst, the seed is still in your bag!

You can then directly sow your seed into your garden where you would like it to be, or if you want to be more sure that it germinates, and you actually see where the plant is placed, store the seed in a sealed, dry, cool place until about six weeks before your last frost. Sow your seed in flats, and wait for the babies!!! 8)

Hope this helps, and enjoy your pretty pink (rose) poppy! :wink:
VAL

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I agree with Val's assessment of the plant and harvesting seed...

Just a note that this is an old garden plant and as it's name suggests, it's not exactly legal in a lot of places, like the United States or Canada, f'rinstance...you should not be handing this one out to friends and family unless they are aware of the, uh... provenance of said plant. I just had a conversation with a VERY well known garden writer who has been handing this one around to friends, family and even putting in some gardens she is consulting on, including a library in a very well to-do town here in Connecticut! An opium den at the local library? :lol: I told said author here secret is safe with me, but she says she could care less and let them arrest her (she then added an aside that no one is ever going to i.d. the plant anyway, except for plant heads and none of them would care enough to raise the alarm. She has a point...) :roll:

Just a word of warning...

Scott

grandpasrose
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Hi Kim! I did a little research around your poppy seeds as a result of Scott's warning. This is what I found:

Opium poppies are scheduled under U.S. Law. The Controlled Substances Act, Schedule II, lists "Opium poppy and poppy straw". The law has Poppies scheduled (under 'Mescaline' in the Federal Listing) as "Concentrate of poppy straw (crude extract of poppy straw in either liquid, solid or powder form which contains the phenanthrene alkaloids of opium poppies)".

There is some confusion in the law, because opium-producing poppies are widely grown around the US and Canada and the opium poppy seeds are very prevalent in cooking, breads, and desserts. The grey-blue poppy seeds sold in almost every grocery store in the US and Canada contain low levels of opiates. Poppy pods are widely used and sold in dry flower arrangements.

The law in the US is somewhat undecided about these plants, although there are attempts to try to stop them from being sold or grown. If poppies are grown as sources for opiates, there is no question that it violates the CSA. If poppies are only grown for ornamental purposes, their legal position is somewhat less clear cut, since they are so widely grown everywhere and available.

Opium for legal commercial pharmaceutical use is grown with special government licenses around the world, but very little of it is grown in the US. Large scale underground opium poppy growing is reported to take place in Mexico, Afghanistan, and many other countries in Asia. Much of the produced opium is converted into heroin to make it is easier to ship and it commands a higher price than raw opium.
Currently it is illegal to grow papaver somniferum, opium poppy seed, and opium poppies in the US; however, it is legal to possess poppies, dried flowers, poppy seed and opium poppy seeds.

So basically, you can't grow them, but you can have them. Figure that one out and we're all smarter! :?

So Kim, that's the scoop, now do as you wish, knowing that they are grown in everyone's garden in north america! :wink:
VAL
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

garden4fun
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THANK YOU!!!

Oh dear! As I originally posted this in not in MY garden, but in a garden seen by a friend. I have never ever seen this grown local, which is why I did not recorgnize it.
THANKS so much for solving the mystery!
Kim
Kim P.
Gardening requires lots of water - most of it in the form of perspiration. ~Lou Erickson

grandpasrose
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No problem Kim! That's what the forum's all about! Hope you visit again! :wink:
VAL
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

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Kim it's okay to garden with this one for fun, just not profit! :lol:

Scott

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