fourfortytwo
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Location: ZONE 4B cental maine

Foxglove Frustrations going Fisticuffs with 'Phiniums

So I put 50 pelleted foxglove seeds in a little tray of coir-based potting mix, which has served me well in many other capacities, "pelleted" they came as little gold beads, well quickly the gold paint broke away and I lost sight of the seeds, but made sure to not disturb the surface as its directed they need light to germinate. Gentle misting with water. 65-70 F. Same story with 50 delphinium seeds. I only tamped them into the soil, but didn't bury, kept them in the fridge two weeks prior to introducing them to soil. Three weeks not a peep, nothing. I'm stumped. I was looking forward to those ones too, next year maybe. Rosemary, absolutely nothing either. Any ideas before I launch the soil into a un-used corner?
Zone 4B, Maine. Approx. 124 day growing season, 50% frost-free certainty May 14th-Oct 1st. Ten 4'x8'x15" raised beds with PVC hoops attached with lightest weight row cover/bird netting/30% shade cloth, depending.

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Foxglove Frustrations going Fisticuffs with 'Phiniums

I doubt the soil has anything to do with your problems. You need to know the right conditions that each seed needs, which can be different for every different kind of plant.

The delphiniums need dark for germination. So they need to be tamped into the soil and then lightly covered with a thin layer of sand or loose potting soil. They do benefit from pre-chilling (cold stratification), but just putting the seeds in the refrigerator does not accomplish that. They must be planted in damp potting mix and then the whole thing covered and refrigerated. Some people say that the easiest way to sprout delphinium is to press them between damp paper towels and put that in a zip lock and leave for 36 hours, as a kind of pre-soak, then plant.

Rosemary does have a somewhat low germination rate and is slow. It helps to pre-soak these seeds in a little bit of water for just a few hours (in fact, I think most seeds benefit from at least a bit of pre-soak, to help get them ready to germinate). Then they need moisture and warmth: 75 to 85 deg F. The potting mix needs to stay consistently moist, not wet. A humidity dome may help with that, though it needs to be removed as soon as the first seedlings show. They still may take anywhere from two weeks to a month to germinate and then they grow slowly after that.

Best wishes!
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

fourfortytwo
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Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2015 2:43 pm
Location: ZONE 4B cental maine

Re: Foxglove Frustrations going Fisticuffs with 'Phiniums

Interesting, Ill try it again with damp potting mix/zip loc bags. Right now they just got set outside, it's cold and damp out there for sure.. maybe when natural spring hits (if the seeds didn't rot, which the media was too dry if anything, than maybe they will get triggered by an artificial dormancy period. it was 70ish where they were, now they are on the porch in april, soon it will heat up fast perhaps they will come up after all. cabbages and cauliflowers germinated super fast and look great though, after I changed to a soil, instead of soil-less mix. strange how the seedlings are identical, good thing I put a label or I wouldn't be able to tell at all. peppers, eggplants, and basil are sharing a the heat mat now, wait n see.
Zone 4B, Maine. Approx. 124 day growing season, 50% frost-free certainty May 14th-Oct 1st. Ten 4'x8'x15" raised beds with PVC hoops attached with lightest weight row cover/bird netting/30% shade cloth, depending.

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rainbowgardener
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Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 6:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

Re: Foxglove Frustrations going Fisticuffs with 'Phiniums

In general, annuals like your veggies are much quicker and easier to grow from seed. The delphinium and rosemary are particularly difficult challenges (and I don't know anything about the foxglove).
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration



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