erins327
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Yay thanks Marlin!

What are signs of showing signs of stress? There was *one* seedling that the leaves kind of yellowed after being outside. I assume that one got burned from the sunlight? But the others look fine.

It will be interesting if I have to move them already. I was hoping I would have to re-pot them for another few weeks. Space is so limited Im not sure where Im going to put 50 4" pots! But I guess this is a good problem to have so far!

filmnet
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water this from the bottom the seeds and plants will be better!!!!

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LA47
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Please pardon me for barging in but, Marlingarder, I've read posts where you mentioned your plant shelves but I was thinking you meant the special metal plant shelves with lights for each shelf. Would you please explain more about your set-up. I would be very interested as I'm limited on indoor space. I will be starting my seeds in about 2 or 3 weeks. Thanks!
High Altitude Gardener zone 4B or 5A

erins327
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Updated pic

Hi guys!

Loving my little tomatoes and pepper growth. Watching them everyday like little children growing up. :)

Here in Central Texas I am able to put them outside in the late mornings until the evening, so they are getting the real sunlight, wind, etc. and seem to be loving it!

Ive put the pepper seedlings in a black wheelbarrow, hoping that will raise the temps slighty since ideally they like a little warmer (its a high of 65 today)

Im cutting out old milk jugs and 2L coke bottles that I can surround the seedlings when we put them in the ground next month. To give them a little insulation?

What do you think? Any advice for the future?

https://i1303.photobucket.com/albums/ag1 ... 75106a.jpg

https://i1303.photobucket.com/albums/ag1 ... 8114a8.jpg

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rainbowgardener
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You've done well getting a whole bunch of nice seedlings going.

Some of them are looking kind of small and not thriving for being 6 weeks along. And the soil in the picture looks dry. I don't know if that was just that moment. But sometimes peat heavy soil can be hard to get wet, tends to repel water. Bottom watering helps as well as being sure it is thoroughly wetted before you plant. Tell us a little more about how you are watering and fertilizing.
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erins327
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Yes, I did think too that the pepper seedlings were not growing as abundant as the tomato ones, but I thought maybe that was temp related? Since they like it a little warmer ideally than maybe it has been?

I do watering from the bottom, every other day. I did it yesterday so I will water them again tomorrow. The first cm or so is dry, but moist soil underneath to the bottom. I used clear cocktail cups to put some of them in, which is nice because I can see the moisture, and the roots at the bottom.

I have not fertilized yet, just more organic potting soil was placed into the containers when they were moved to bigger ones. When should I start fertilizing them more? Ive heard fertilizing young seedlings can be tricky, more like you can do more harm than good.
I have some compost ready too, I can top off the containers with that??

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rainbowgardener
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If your potting soil does not have fertilizer in it, I would start fertilizing as soon as they have true leaves. If you are using synthetic fertilizer, you need to use it like a quarter strength at first (weekly weakly, they say), then half strength later. If you are using organic nutrients like compost, compost tea, fish emulsion, etc, it is not as sensitive. This year, so far I've been just adding the leachate from my worm bin (and my potting soil does have nutrients in it).
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erins327
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Wow thanks Rainbowgardener.

Once again, I would have not been successful without this blog because I would not have caught that!
I knew that seedlings were sensitive to fertilizer, and somehow I assumed to stay away from it, seeing that I thought the potting soil was enough. It looks like my potting soil was NOT enough, and hardly had anything in it.

I diluted it and started my fertilizing yesterday.

Will they just get a slow start? Or am I effecting the seedling in any way to where they will be hindered in producing vegetables later on?
When march 15th comes (that is our zone's frost free date) how will I know they are ready to put in the ground?

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rainbowgardener
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If you have nice sturdy little plants with three sets of true leaves they are big enough. But you do know they have to be hardened off, right?

Plants grown indoors are very tender, not used to sunlight (way more intense than the lights they've been under), cold, breezes, etc. So you have to get them used to all that gradually a little at a time. Start by putting them out in a protected spot, with no direct sun, for a few hours. Each day you can gradually increase the exposure. Pick your weather for when you first bring them out - windy is at least as damaging as too much sun.

Earlier you said: "There was *one* seedling that the leaves kind of yellowed after being outside. I assume that one got burned from the sunlight?"

Not so. Yellowing is more likely to be over-watering or the soil staying too wet. Sunburned leaves turn white, with thinned, almost crispy spots.

No not "effecting the seedling in any way to where they will be hindered in producing vegetables later on? " Just slowed it down a little getting started.
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Gary350
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Re: Any way to save the sprouters?

erins327 wrote:Hey guys!

3 weeks down now with my seedlings, and it looks like the Tomatillos are starting to get weedy. I realize this could be from not warm enough temps under the heating mat, or they want more light than their fellow cherry tomato friends?

Is there a way to save them from being so tall and falling over? Can I bury the stem more so they will eventually root out from there?

It would be nice to save them!

Image

Thanks,
Erin
Tall thin plants mean sun light shortage. They are growing tall in search of light. Once your plants come up through the soil they need to go outside in real sunlight every day. Cold weather will not hurt the plants as long as it is not freezing. I put my plants outside in 34 deg F weather if it gets any colder than that they need to be in a mini green house that will warm up from the sun and hold heat. You can put plants on the dash of your car during the day then bring them in the house when the sun starts to go down.

erins327
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Location: Houston, TX

Thanks Rainbowgardener,

At this point, they have been hardened off. I started it about 10ish days ago, and they go outside during the middle of the day when it is warmest (at avg 65 degrees this week) now.

And yes, the tomatillos turned a little yellow. Geesh had no idea it could be from overwatering? They might have to be on a different schedule that everyone else. As of right now the Orange cherry and the Sea Man tomatoes look happy, and getting thick and tall. The others (tomatillos, peppers) are growing, but just not at the same rate. Warmth? Too much water? Who knows, I guess its all about trail and error.

My water schedule is water at the bottom of the tray, every other day. What doesnt get soaked up, I take out so there is no standing water. Fertilizer once a week.

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