gumbo2176
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Okra in the ground

I decided today would be a great day to put in the okra seeds. It is sunny, warm, and the ground is still fairly damp from the previous few days of heavy rainfall. I put in 64 seeds and did so between my onion and beets in the row. By the time the okra is big enough to start shading things, the beets and onions will be ready to pull.

Gotta utilize the space available and companion planting is a great way to do it. My raised bed has 6 tomato plants that are really taking off, with lots of buds, vigorous growth and offering a good bit of shade for my 30 or so leaf lettuce plants growing beneath them. I harvested a large bag of lettuce last week and can do more later today. I must use it before it gets too hot and the lettuce starts to bolt.

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applestar
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Sounds like a great plan. :D

I have a similar strategy and am planning to grow Alabama Red okra between two rows of snap peas in one bed and Clemson Spineless between a row of onions and a row of shell peas. (My "rows" are far shorter than yours however :lol:) Clemson Spineless did superbly last year sown directly in the ground and I'm hoping for the same this year. I did start some back up Alabama Reds when I started my tomatoes and they are starting to grow their first true leaves.

If you are sowing yours now, I guess it'll be at least another month for me. When was your last frost (do you have frost?)

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paigej
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Oh, I'm jealous :(

Everyone else has been having such warm weather and ours has been colder than normal, cloudy, and wet. No Okra here for a while...
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gumbo2176
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applestar wrote:Sounds like a great plan. :D

I have a similar strategy and am planning to grow Alabama Red okra between two rows of snap peas in one bed and Clemson Spineless between a row of onions and a row of shell peas. (My "rows" are far shorter than yours however :lol:) Clemson Spineless did superbly last year sown directly in the ground and I'm hoping for the same this year. I did start some back up Alabama Reds when I started my tomatoes and they are starting to grow their first true leaves.

If you are sowing yours now, I guess it'll be at least another month for me. When was your last frost (do you have frost?)
Our winter was so mild this year I believe we only had 3-4 nights of actual frost. It is close to 90 today in my back yard so I decided to put the seeds in the ground. I also grow Clemson Spineless and have done so for several years. I don't mess with success, and that variety gives me all I need and then lots more.

Just curious, does the Alabama Red Okra cook up red or does it turn green when it hits the heat? I've grown purple hulled beans before that cook up green and some that have stayed purple when cooked.

I've thought about growing some of that and may put some in just for the heck of it. To a Cajun, there is no such thing as too much okra. It all comes down to how much I keep and how much I give away.

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applestar
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Alabama Red only has red along the ribs so it's not that noticeable. If you want the wow factor, you should grow Burgundy, which is mahogany red all the way. Gorgeous plant. I don't remember if they stayed red after cooking though. I seem to remember them cooking up darker khaki green, but I'm not sure.

I was hoping Alabama was a bit redder than this but I have to use up these seeds before I can get Burgundy seeds. Probably next year. :wink: (last time I grew them I bought starts from the herb lady who was experimenting -- they didn't sell well and she gave them to me for like a dollar each, so I doubt she'll be growing them again. ).

Alabama red is also different from Clemson in that the pods are stocky and not as long.

brandon558
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nice...okra is one of my favorites.

Ill have to wait untill mid April before i put the okra in the ground.

Clemson spineless did great last year.

Not too much longer...

Good luck!

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KeriFord
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I want! but I'm scared of the stuff. my grandma sent me out to pick hers one day...she didn't mention I should have long sleeves on. I thought it was just me allergic to them, but my aunt said that was common.

I swore I'd never grow them after that but oh how I would love some fresh okra! maybe one of these years I'll get over it. but not this year. the burning, itching and swelling is still to fresh in my mind :)
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gumbo2176
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KeriFord wrote:I want! but I'm scared of the stuff. my grandma sent me out to pick hers one day...she didn't mention I should have long sleeves on. I thought it was just me allergic to them, but my aunt said that was common. :)

Funny you should mention that. When I first started harvesting okra many years ago, it would do the same to me. Now, it doesn't even bother me to pick it and I never wear long sleeves, gloves, etc.

For a plant that produces so much and is gown locally I can't fathom why it is so expensive in the markets here. Last summer I saw okra going for over $3.00 a lb. at the local supermarket. I'll have one full row this summer and will probably pick between 60-80 pods a day when in full production.

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KeriFord
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gumbo2176 wrote: Funny you should mention that. When I first started harvesting okra many years ago, it would do the same to me. Now, it doesn't even bother me to pick it and I never wear long sleeves, gloves, etc.

For a plant that produces so much and is gown locally I can't fathom why it is so expensive in the markets here. Last summer I saw okra going for over $3.00 a lb. at the local supermarket. I'll have one full row this summer and will probably pick between 60-80 pods a day when in full production.
dang, that's pricey! there is quite a bit of okra that comes off one plant. I'm trying to think of other veggies at the grocery store that are that much per pound, but I'm blanking.
Started a garden when Son wanted to grow carrots. When not reading, in the dirt, canning or baking, I write Country, Contemporary Romances.

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gumbo2176
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KeriFord wrote:
gumbo2176 wrote:
KeriFord wrote:
dang, that's pricey! there is quite a bit of okra that comes off one plant. I'm trying to think of other veggies at the grocery store that are that much per pound, but I'm blanking.
Hot house tomatoes are about $2.50 a lb., Brussels sprouts are close to $3 a lb., Heirloom tomatoes are ridiculous at over $4 a lb., Swiss Chard goes for over $2.50 for a bunch with no more than 7-8 leaves. I picked close to 30 lbs. of chard a couple weeks ago and gave most of it away to family, friends, and neighbors. Figuring the prices at the market, that must have been well over $100 worth of greens.

No wonder I grow most of my own produce.

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KeriFord
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gumbo2176 wrote:
Hot house tomatoes are about $2.50 a lb., Brussels sprouts are close to $3 a lb., Heirloom tomatoes are ridiculous at over $4 a lb., Swiss Chard goes for over $2.50 for a bunch with no more than 7-8 leaves. I picked close to 30 lbs. of chard a couple weeks ago and gave most of it away to family, friends, and neighbors. Figuring the prices at the market, that must have been well over $100 worth of greens.

No wonder I grow most of my own produce.
that's crazy! I don't look unless I see it in the paper. I'm too busy trying to keep my kid out of the ice packed around the melons (so gross) when at the store. in a strange way, I think I'd rather not know because I need the stuff when I can't grow it!
Started a garden when Son wanted to grow carrots. When not reading, in the dirt, canning or baking, I write Country, Contemporary Romances.

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applestar
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I soaked my okra seeds yesterday, then drained them over a plate lined with a paper towel and left them overnight with the upended jar over them. This afternoon, most of the seeds had germinated with a radicle (root tip) showing. I sowed them as planned today in fresh compost and finished composed enriched beds. We're expecting a couple of cold nights in the 40's early next week, but it was hot today. 8)

We just had a thunderstorm pass through too, so I think they are set and I just have to wait for them to break ground. :wink:

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